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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 20, 2013
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    324

    Default Moving water

    We're about to get new fencing put in and add some new pastures. No automatic waterers, so we have a 70 gal rubbermaid tub in each pasture.

    It would take several hoses (and lots of dragging and watching and waiting) to run out to each tub, so I'm thinking it would be best to transport a tub of water down and fill them.

    What's the best way (automatic waterers excluded) to carry down the water?

    I ran the numbers and to mostly fill a tub it's 500# worth of water each.

    Have use of pickup truck and 45hp tractor with 1500# loader.

    David



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 20, 2013
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    324

    Default

    Anyone ever build a skid for the tub and move the entire tub around with the tractor / pallet forks?

    David



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 18, 2008
    Location
    Alberta, Canada and South Australia
    Posts
    2,928

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DHCarrotfeeder View Post
    Anyone ever build a skid for the tub and move the entire tub around with the tractor / pallet forks?

    David
    This sounds like it works well but I ended up having to do it every other day for close to a year and half the time you end up sloshing water out along the way. Then having to fend off horses to get in and out of the pasture.

    I would suggest a small water tank on back on a pick up. Use hose to fill up tank, then short hose into tank. in pasture. The water tank on pick up can be even a big blue barrel ( 44 gallons?) which make them quick and easy to fill.

    P.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 21, 2012
    Posts
    1,332

    Default

    The smaller barrels can be tipped (poured) from a tailgate into a trough- so it saves you time on waiting to fill the tank. You just need to be able to put lids on them so you don't lose half your water on the way to the field.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 28, 2002
    Location
    East of Dog River
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    5,726

    Default

    Smaller (500 gallons or less) water tank in the back of the truck. Add required fittings - gate valve and larger diameter hose - and fill it then drive with the water to the troughs. I haul water every week from town and use this system and have for years. Poly tanks are light and almost managable for one person but they are clumsy
    Founder of the Dyslexic Clique. Dyslexics of the world - UNTIE!!

    Member: Incredible Invisbles



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    11,372

    Default

    The water barrels you can get for camping might be a solution for you. The ones I've seen have a hose so you don't have to worry about dumping.

    I don't think that moving a filled tank with a fork lift would work out well as you hit bumps and lose water. But I've not tried it.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
    Posts
    9,372

    Default

    Lots of free surface effect in a big water trough like that, I'd be afraid to move it, or it'd take too long. I vote for the tank in the back of the pickup truck, either barrels or the poly tanks. I don't know about the cost effectiveness of using un buried irrigation pipe as an option, whether your site is set up so that you could run them safely, how much your area freezes etc. For a while we had an auto waterer set up for our small animals that ran off of a five gallon bucket and a surface irrigation pipe (that black plastic stuff) that could accept a hose at either end as a semi permanent water pipe outdoors. The auto waterer parts were too delicate to remain outside and were damaged by freezing.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    40,845

    Default

    Google bladder pillow tanks, here is one company:

    http://www.atlinc.com/pillow.html#C2

    For years, we had one such foldable plastic bladder tank for the bed of our pickup, to take water to places where we needed it.

    You can also take that full collapsible tank in the loader of your tractor, if you are using the pickup for something else.

    We still have two of those bladder tanks that are small, fit in the bed of the UTV, a wheelbarrow or small ATV trailer.

    Today, practically every Craiglist I have seen has those used "totes" for sale, many that are plumbed for water with a valve at the bottom.

    You have to be sure they are rinsed well, some are sold already for potable water.
    They weigh maybe 30 to 50 lbs, so easy to pick up and put on a pickup bed or tractor bucket or pallet on forks.
    Many farmers here give them away:

    http://www.repurposedmaterialsinc.co...-totes-ibc.php



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 20, 2013
    Posts
    324

    Default

    Obviously a good point about sloshing while moving the open tubs.

    I would use the truck but it's not set up for off-highway driving and I'd hate to leave skidmarks in the grass, so I'm thinking tractor again.

    I forgot about the totes: 275g * 8.3#/gal = 2250lb. I wonder if it would be overkill to rig one of those to hang on the 3pt or hang off an SSQA. Add a 12v or PTO-powered transfer pump and it could be quite easy. Hmm.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2005
    Location
    Elmwood, Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,371

    Default

    We have field stock tanks that are a quarter mile from the
    nearest water hydrant. We have surface laid black plastic
    water hose set along the fenceline and buried under each
    gate leading to the tanks. The tank has a float which admits
    water when refill is needed (a bit like the mechanism in a
    toilet tank). We only use these tanks Spring to Fall so the
    freezing of the lines in winter doesn't affect the horses. The
    line and the float tolerate freezing fine.

    If that were not possible, I would choose a couple totes and
    a hay wagon to haul water out to the field tanks. To prepare
    the totes we bought for use, we ran the water from the
    gutters on our indoor arena through the tote (in the top and
    out the spicot at the bottom) for a few weeks. With that
    much water through them, not likely to have anything
    harmful left afterwards. I would choose a hay wagon over
    a pickup bed or tractor bucket because a tote hold 250 gallons of water is a ton of material, a lot of weight.
    Last edited by Robin@DHH; Jun. 16, 2013 at 01:50 PM. Reason: bad arithmetic
    Robin from Dancing Horse Hill
    Elmwood, Wisconsin



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 20, 2013
    Posts
    324

    Default

    Fortunately I think 3-4 tubs at under 50gal / ea is the max run we'll make, so we'll only ever use 2/3 of a tote at a time.

    I don't have a hay wagon right now, only the pickup and tractor.

    Maybe moving one of these around with pallet forks is the answer:
    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi..._on_pallet.jpg

    I would be limited to 1000lb or so but the tote does not need to be full.

    Just pull up in front of the tub, lift it 4' high and open the bottom port. Close when the tub is full.
    Last edited by DHCarrotfeeder; Jun. 16, 2013 at 03:15 PM.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    40,845

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DHCarrotfeeder View Post
    Obviously a good point about sloshing while moving the open tubs.

    I would use the truck but it's not set up for off-highway driving and I'd hate to leave skidmarks in the grass, so I'm thinking tractor again.

    I forgot about the totes: 275g * 8.3#/gal = 2250lb. I wonder if it would be overkill to rig one of those to hang on the 3pt or hang off an SSQA. Add a 12v or PTO-powered transfer pump and it could be quite easy. Hmm.
    We fill any portable water contraption with hoses, empty by gravity.

    Just remember not to put so much water that the way of transporting it can't handle that much weight.

    A front end loader should be ok with pallet points, a palled and a tote strapped on it.

    Or rig it to carry said pallet on the three point hitch.
    Either way, it should lift it enough to gravity flow into most kinds of stock tanks.

    We have three of those, ours are older, light blue and cost less than $10 at that time, that fit in the tractor bucket or UTV box:

    http://www.territorialseed.com/product/15453/277

    We use them to set fence posts in concrete, as our water source or welding, to keep any fire we may start down by wetting all around where we are working and keeping our hand sprayer and a brush broom wet to hit any extra sparks.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 3, 2006
    Location
    Spooner, WI
    Posts
    2,251

    Default

    That looks that would work marvelously with pallet forks as long as you could tip the forks back. I'm thinking otherwise the tote would bounce right off the forks.

    DH made a slanted tote out of a 55 gallon plastic drum. He put different fittings on the bung hole cover, to allow a shut off valve and for garden hose tipped it on it side cut a hole in the side, used plumbing cement to cement a fitting for a cap. We use this for filling. It is mounted on an angled wood frame that I even can carry around easily. We used small ratchet straps to keep the drum in place. Attach a hose to the reworked bung and Voila! Automatic gravity fed water dispenser. Put it in the back of truck to fill it and away you go.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2005
    Location
    Spotsylvania, VA
    Posts
    13,095

    Default

    I carry one of these
    http://www.tractorsupply.com/en/stor...ge-tank-65-gal
    in my golf cart. Would it fit in the bucket of your Loader?
    I wasn't always a Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
    Posts
    9,372

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DHCarrotfeeder View Post
    Fortunately I think 3-4 tubs at under 50gal / ea is the max run we'll make, so we'll only ever use 2/3 of a tote at a time.

    I don't have a hay wagon right now, only the pickup and tractor.

    Maybe moving one of these around with pallet forks is the answer:
    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi..._on_pallet.jpg

    I would be limited to 1000lb or so but the tote does not need to be full.

    Just pull up in front of the tub, lift it 4' high and open the bottom port. Close when the tub is full.
    We have one with integral slots for the forks. Not real beefy though.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2004
    Location
    Houston, Tx
    Posts
    1,028

    Default

    I hauled water for a year with two 65 gallon tanks in my truck. Worked fine. Gravity flow takes care of getting the water out of the truck to the tanks. One thing, if you go this route, change the fitting on the tank to be bigger than the standard garden hose. personally, I bought some 1 in PVC pipe (very cheap) and just took the spigot off the tank to dump into my water troughs.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar. 11, 2006
    Location
    South of the Mason-Dixon Line
    Posts
    2,321

    Default

    Have you explored the idea of having another, closer well put in? My husband drove the last one on our farm. It can be a DIY project depending on what is below the surface.
    Ridge Farm Inc.-full care retirement
    http://www.horseretirementfarm.com



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar. 28, 2002
    Location
    East of Dog River
    Posts
    5,726

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by f4leggin View Post
    I hauled water for a year with two 65 gallon tanks in my truck. Worked fine. Gravity flow takes care of getting the water out of the truck to the tanks. One thing, if you go this route, change the fitting on the tank to be bigger than the standard garden hose. personally, I bought some 1 in PVC pipe (very cheap) and just took the spigot off the tank to dump into my water troughs.
    Gravity works just fine. My 180 gallon tank has a 2" gate valve and I am running 2" suction hose (from an air seeder) for water flow. Suction hose is safe for drinking water.
    Founder of the Dyslexic Clique. Dyslexics of the world - UNTIE!!

    Member: Incredible Invisbles



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep. 29, 2009
    Posts
    2,576

    Default

    We had horses out in the pasture beyond where the hose could reach, and we were not digging water lines.

    A pvc spigot with a turn valve, long piece pf pvc all from home depot, or wherever is all you need.

    Place big rubbermaid plastic tub put in the back of the truck, fill with water.
    When not in use, disconnect the long pvc, and set it next to the trough for the next time when you load up the trough into the truck. Easy.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2007
    Location
    Maryland USA
    Posts
    1,500

    Default

    I think maybe you are underestimating how much of a pita driving water around is. There will be twice as much waiting in a hauling situation. You'll wait around for it to fill your tank, then you'll drive out and wait for it to fill the troughs.

    I don't know anybody who does it by choice. If dragging several hoses around is possible, that's probably far less work, and less waiting..

    If you really want to haul it, get a tote or tank in the back of the pickup or on a carry-all on the tractor's 3 point hitch so you have something sealed on top and you are not sloshing half your load on the way there so forced to drive at 1mph.



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