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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 27, 2011
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    387



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 15, 2008
    Posts
    3,252

    Default

    is right !
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Gravity works, and the laws of physics are a bitch.

    Member: Rabid Garden Snail Clique



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    Posts
    5,679

    Default

    Seriously - at that point, why wouldn't you just have two rigs - one for the horses, and one for the people? That thing looks enormous, and I could not imagine how cumbersome it would be to tow.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2009
    Posts
    3,725

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    Looks like it's a pop-up. Tall, but not like it looks all popped up!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Posts
    595

    Default

    I'm trying to figure out why you could ever possibly need two kitchens in a horse trailer.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 15, 2008
    Posts
    3,252

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    they're going to use it as a camper too... i'm thinking: get a horse trailer, and then get an airstream. this combination vehicle--well, "eggs in one basket" comes to mind...
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Gravity works, and the laws of physics are a bitch.

    Member: Rabid Garden Snail Clique


    3 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2011
    Location
    So California
    Posts
    3,274

    Default

    Wow.

    The lower level comprises room for 14 horses, finished in stainless steel, and accommodation for two strappers.

    Upstairs, the truck boasts two bedrooms and a lounge-kitchen area...

    ...The third level, which can be accessed by an attic ladder, comprises a viewing platform, complete with stainless steel fold-up handrails. There are also anchor points for large umbrellas to provide spectators with shade.

    In all, the semi-trailer can sleep six.

    There are no problems with ablutions – there are two bathrooms – and it even has a second kitchen.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2003
    Location
    Windward Farm, Washougal, WA- our work in progress, our money pit, our home!
    Posts
    7,124

    Default

    Awesome! Like a horsey toy-hauler! Remember, horse hauling and camping differ greatly around the world. If you read the article, it clearly "pops up" to increase head room, and the top is a viewing area. I'm astounded that it holds 14 horses! Clearly a semi-sized rig.
    Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 15, 2004
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    8,232

    Default

    must be for 14 small horses... I can't imagine fitting my mare in the space...



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 7, 2004
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    1,187

    Default

    Rigs similar (though smaller) to these are the norm here. We call them horse trucks or trucks - but they are not like your trucks!!!! Mine takes 4 large (17 hh+) horses easily, plus has living area with kitchen, gas oven, fridge etc. Storage space to carry enough feed and hay for a week away. I usually need to top up the water tanks if I've got a full load and am away for more than 2 nights. My truck is very, very basic compared to some. Mine is all one unit, with a 12 tonne tare (empty) weight. This unit looks as if its a semi - so the body of the truck attaches to a cab / engine unit. On a station in Australia the unit probably also tows sheep or cattle transporters.

    And False Impression - I think that the picture may be mis-leading. There is usually heaps of room for horses. They also travel well in the trucks, usually angled facing slightly back, although this one looks like they might be angle forwards.

    A truck I recently looked at had a pop up top like this. Manufacturors found that the pop up top got very hot on sunny days, so they installed a heat transfer system!!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2004
    Location
    South Park
    Posts
    3,352

    Default

    What is "Camp Drafting?"
    A friend told me I was delusional. I almost fell off my unicorn.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2009
    Location
    CA to Costa Rica to WI
    Posts
    988

    Default

    I think it's not nearly as scary as it looks.

    First, the top half pops up, so when you're actually driving it, it is significantly shorter and not as unbalanced as it looks here. Second, the "third story" is just the roof. It has some extra amenities like pop-up hand rails, but doesn't add any height.

    I still think it's a little (lot) over the top, especially if their goal is camping. However, I think the photo makes it look much worse than it is for driving purposes.
    Proud member of the "I'm In My 20's and Hope to Be a Good Rider Someday" clique

    Fourteen Months Living and Working in Costa Rica


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    14,864

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    Not camping - camp drafting is a sport.
    Now there is a person who knows where to spend his money - on horses.
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May. 12, 2008
    Posts
    4,168

    Default

    interesting...Camp drafting:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campdrafting

    So, basically, it is like going to the rodeo in the US - except one event over the week of competitions. The important similarity seems to be the money involved at the top levels allows for people to get fancy trailers like the ones above.

    At least that's my take on it.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    43,058

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    Years ago there were stories of the larger stations in Australia, days away from the cities in the coasts, had extremely large cattle hauling triple deckers, the truck pulling sometimes two or three of those, a whole convoy of those, to move the cattle those immense distances.

    They either also took food and water for them, or had designated stops where they had access to them.

    Here, in the early 1900's, many cattle from the SW were moved by train cattle cars, that had mangers and water troughs, for several days to the Chicago area.
    Someone went with them as attendants.

    It is interesting to see how others do things, is it.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    33,603

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by suzier444 View Post
    I'm trying to figure out why you could ever possibly need two kitchens in a horse trailer.
    one for your grub and one for the horses...or the grooms..
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep. 15, 2003
    Location
    Way up north in Lobsta Country
    Posts
    1,756

    Default

    That would Not fit under any local overpasses...
    the NOT!! Spoiled!! Arabian Protectavest poster pony lives on in my heart http://i118.photobucket.com/albums/o...pscc2a5330.jpg



  18. #18
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2005
    Location
    Australasia
    Posts
    1,204

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    Further to phoebetrainer's post, the following links shows a good cross section of what people use to transport their horses in New Zealand. Prices and degrees of flash (or not) vary considerably.

    Trucks =
    http://www.trademe.co.nz/Browse/Sear...ch_suggested=0

    Floats (what you call trailers I guess) = http://www.trademe.co.nz/Browse/Sear...ch_suggested=0

    Would love to see some examples of how folk in the US and Canada transport their horses.
    where am I, what day is it, am I still having a good time?



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct. 28, 2009
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    543

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Horse with No Name View Post
    Further to phoebetrainer's post, the following links shows a good cross section of what people use to transport their horses in New Zealand. Prices and degrees of flash (or not) vary considerably.

    Trucks =
    http://www.trademe.co.nz/Browse/Sear...ch_suggested=0

    Floats (what you call trailers I guess) = http://www.trademe.co.nz/Browse/Sear...ch_suggested=0

    Would love to see some examples of how folk in the US and Canada transport their horses.
    I've always wondered why no-one (that I've heard of) in the States uses horse trucks (or lorries/horse boxes as per the UK). I get the impression that everyone over there uses either a bumper pull (normal float) or a goose neck trailer (which are starting to show up here now). Is that right? Can anyone shine light on why there's no horse trucks in the States? Seems like it would be right up the alley of the richer people in the sport .


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar. 7, 2004
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    1,187

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kalidascope View Post
    I've always wondered why no-one (that I've heard of) in the States uses horse trucks (or lorries/horse boxes as per the UK)...... Can anyone shine light on why there's no horse trucks in the States? Seems like it would be right up the alley of the richer people in the sport .
    Its because there is sooooo much more money in it - so they go and stay in motels / hotels whatever. Grooms sleep in a spare stable or tack room. And they pay people to plait their horses and ponies too! Oh and someone to "train" and someone to walk the course with the competitor and someone to sign the entry form and someone to tack up the horse and someone else to warm it up.



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