The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 28
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 1, 2011
    Posts
    2,065

    Default Soaking your leg wraps with them ON the horse? Wrapping with straw?

    I was at a hunter/jumper show today, and there was a known dressage rider there and she did some things that I have never seen done before and wondered what and why.
    As a hunter/jumper rider, I am very used to leg wrapping/poulticing.
    Apply poultice to legs. Place wet paper towel/paper (or some people are now using wax paper) on the leg over top of poultice. Wrap with quilts/no bows and wraps. The poultice helps draw any heat out of the leg as it dries, the wet paper towel helps keep the poultice wet longer and keeps the wraps clean, and the wraps compress and 'support'.
    This dressage rider had her horse wrapped with the thick pillow quilts, it appeared from the leg that I could see well that the horse was wrapped with straw under it's wraps. It could be that they just wrapped in the stall and so got some straw stuck under the wrap, but it wasn't just a stray piece or 2, the whole side that I could see had straw sticking out the bottom of it. She then took a good 5 mins per leg and soaked the wraps with a hose getting them completely drenched.
    Is this a common dressage practice? Is it supposed to do the same thing as poultice and wrapping? It seems like it would be uncomfortable and it seemed that the weight of the soaked wraps would encourage them to slide down/not stay in place well. If you do do this why do you do it instead of the poultice method?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 15, 2007
    Location
    (throw dart at map) NC!
    Posts
    4,645

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ElisLove View Post
    I was at a hunter/jumper show today, and there was a known dressage rider there and she did some things that I have never seen done before and wondered what and why.
    As a hunter/jumper rider, I am very used to leg wrapping/poulticing.
    Apply poultice to legs. Place wet paper towel/paper (or some people are now using wax paper) on the leg over top of poultice. Wrap with quilts/no bows and wraps. The poultice helps draw any heat out of the leg as it dries, the wet paper towel helps keep the poultice wet longer and keeps the wraps clean, and the wraps compress and 'support'.
    This dressage rider had her horse wrapped with the thick pillow quilts, it appeared from the leg that I could see well that the horse was wrapped with straw under it's wraps. It could be that they just wrapped in the stall and so got some straw stuck under the wrap, but it wasn't just a stray piece or 2, the whole side that I could see had straw sticking out the bottom of it. She then took a good 5 mins per leg and soaked the wraps with a hose getting them completely drenched.
    Is this a common dressage practice? Is it supposed to do the same thing as poultice and wrapping? It seems like it would be uncomfortable and it seemed that the weight of the soaked wraps would encourage them to slide down/not stay in place well. If you do do this why do you do it instead of the poultice method?
    Allow me to go out on a limb and say "no". This is not common dressage practice". Actually, this reminds me of older basic horsemanship remedies - the straw was used to draw fluids/heat out of the tendons/legs, not unlike a modern poulstice. There are much better remedies these days, but perhaps this trainer was trained by a very "old school" person and wants to keep the practice. Intentionally wetting wraps, as opposed to applying graded wetness in the wraps to draw out fluid? I have no idea.
    Proud member of the Colbert Dressage Nation



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 6, 2005
    Posts
    1,140

    Default

    An earlier method for cooling legs was cold water hosing & before that, standing the horse knee-deep in a cold stream.

    I would also expect the weight of the water to drag the wraps down.

    Maybe those were the tools she had at hand at the show - sometimes you make do with what you've got.
    Hidden Echo Farm, Carlisle, PA -- home of JC palomino sire Canadian Kid (1990 - 2013) & AQHA sire Lark's Favorite, son of Rugged Lark.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 30, 2009
    Posts
    1,891

    Default

    After we would ice a horse before a race we would put on "cold waters" (wet, cold wraps) to take him to the saddling area but I've never seen the straw. Interesting...
    "I've spent most of my life riding horses. The rest I've just wasted". - Anonymous



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 1, 2011
    Posts
    2,065

    Default

    Thanks for the replies.
    I understand cold hosing and have done it more than I care to say, but spraying down the wraps was a new one for me.
    So sounds like this is maybe something that might be super old school that isn't done anymore (at least the straw part, who knows about the soaking part!)



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    14,573

    Default

    Hard to know really. The horse may have allergies and this solves her problems.
    ... _. ._ .._. .._



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul. 1, 2011
    Posts
    2,065

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Equibrit View Post
    Hard to know really. The horse may have allergies and this solves her problems.
    Interesting, how do you think it could help with allergies?



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    15,135

    Default

    Interesting!

    FWIW, I don't think the soaked wraps will do lots of good. You'd be surprised how much even the lower legs can heat up..... so the water will get warm, too. And, man, if your horse has any ideas about skin skank, this surely would set him off.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    19,713

    Default

    I have seen people soak the no bows or quilts before putting them on sopping wet but not wetting them after they were on the horse.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 1, 2011
    Posts
    2,065

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Laurierace View Post
    I have seen people soak the no bows or quilts before putting them on sopping wet but not wetting them after they were on the horse.
    Hmm, I'ver never seen anyone soak leg wraps before at all. How come they were soaking the wraps?



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    19,713

    Default

    Same reason, keep the poultice from drying out longer.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 1, 2011
    Posts
    2,065

    Default

    And the wraps stayed in place well and didn't cause any issues? It seems like the wraps would be super heavy.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    19,713

    Default

    I didn't say I had done it, just that I had seen it done. I saw pretty much everything you can think of in over two decades on the track. I personally stopped using poultice many, many years ago. I think it's main benefit is the half hour that it takes to wash the stuff off. Much better, easier alternatives in my opinion. For just every day sort of thing, not an actual injury I like Sore No More and Back on Track no bows.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    15,135

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Laurierace View Post
    I think it's main benefit is the half hour that it takes to wash the stuff off. Much better, easier alternatives in my opinion.
    Not if you are me and 2 minutes into a prescribed 20 minutes of cold-hosing, you ask, "Are we there yet?"

    The spraying off those chips of poultice is probably where the good is.

    Oh, and poultice can turn around and heat up if you leave it on too long. I've personally done that. Oops.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 8, 2012
    Location
    gulf coast
    Posts
    952

    Default

    Was she wetting the wraps to soften/ disolve the poltice and to remove the straw that was stuck in the wrap? Did all four leg wraps have straw or just one?



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan. 6, 2008
    Location
    Area II, the Blue Ridge Mountains
    Posts
    1,955

    Default

    I think she was just plain weird...


    2 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    19,713

    Default

    As an aside, I had someone tell me that you had to make sure there was never any straw underneath the bandage because it would penetrate the skin and scratch the periosteum. I told her she could spend the rest of her life trying to scratch the periosteum with a piece of straw and she couldn't do it! I also had someone tell me not to swim my race horses because the water would make their tendons soggy forever. I guess they thought tendons were made out of white bread.


    10 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar. 16, 2003
    Location
    Wet and Windy Washington
    Posts
    3,778

    Default

    I also had someone tell me not to swim my race horses because the water would make their tendons soggy forever. I guess they thought tendons were made out of white bread.
    ROFLMAO...but wait, this may explain alot, my horse puts his head under water so maybe he just has a soggy brain!!!
    I have horse to sell to you. Horse good for riding. Can pull cart. Horse good size. Eats carrots and apples. Likes attention. Move head to music. No like opera! You like you buy.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jul. 1, 2011
    Posts
    2,065

    Default

    Well, I guess I have a sorta answer. Someone on another board posted this:
    Ive this done before! It wasnt by a dressage rider tho. many moons ago I worked at a racetrack and one of the "OLD" grooms used to do this! I'll tell you what he told me. You wet the leg, start grabbing from you clean pile of straw(he used loose straw not baled, and it looked like he had picked through them one by one as they were in a perfect pattern of up 'n' down and sorted them) he would then, hold the straw and the start of a pillow wrap and pack 'n' wrap around the leg. Once the pillow wrap was on he would take the outer leg wrap and wrap the leg a tish on the tight side. I was told this was to hold it once it was wet and the pillow wrap flattened a tish. Then he would wet the whole leg for a good 15 min. He would lean in while wetting it and working from the bottom of the wrap he would massage up the wrap. This not only massaged the horses leg it pushed ice cold water into and out of the wrap the whole time. While he was working on the massaging bit he would lean over a bit and let the hose fill the bucket the horses back legs were in....well really it was the other 3 legs. Since he did always put all 4 legs into ice cold water to start with. So ok, ice water buckets on all 4 legs, get your needed supplies, pull out one leg, wrap it, massage/hose it, while massaging fill one of the other three buckets starting with the hind of the leg your working on. Why? Because that leg is going to be last so it will have to wait the longest with no attn.. He would also rotate which leg he would start on each time he did this..which in this case was daily...monday left front, tues..left rear..you see where this is going.. I kind of his thinking to be a bit ocd'ish but Ive learned better since then. Once he was done with the massage/hosing on all 4 legs. He would walk the horse for 5 min. , pop him/her into a stall so deep with fresh straw the horse had to just about wade in....think of the heaven the horse must have felt...walking into that stall after a hard run in any kind of weather or footing...they each got a warm mash, their hay and were left alone in a stall far in the back away from the noise and doings of a racetrack barn. He'd leave em back there until when during one of his 30 min checks on them. The horse would meet him at the stall door. He said that was the horses way of telling him he'd refreshed himself and was ready for more of the 24/7 stress of being a racehorse. Then he would unwrap the legs, rub some wintergreen oil, peppermint oil and olive oil mixture into their legs and put them back in their normal stall on the main row. He said he uses straw because its hollow, as he hoses the straw fills up with cold water, while he massages it pushed that now warmed by the hot leg water out, then repeat...its the hand done way of one of them high dollar bubbling leg boot icing kits..Boss dont need to spend money on that kind of stuff whiles hes got me...Remember this was when leg boot bubbling boots were seen only in major vet hospitals...not trackside. This old guy had to 90 if he was a day, maybe I was just that young..I was 8. I worked the track the next 4 summers with him. I learned many things from him...many thought he was an old good for nothing groom who didnt know when to hang it up. He told once he was just waiting for the right person to pass it along to..someone who will share it. I do a lot of things with my horses the old way, it takes longer, its harder to do as in you have to do the work not some fancy bubbling boot, you learn what your horses legs feel like when they are right, you'll know when they are off even a tish, and the bond one gets with that horse, in knowing that animal is amazing. I do believe we have to take care of our horses for them to be able to take care of us.


    9 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Oct. 23, 2004
    Location
    Sisters, Oregon
    Posts
    1,903

    Default

    Thank you so much for sharing that story, it was wonderful.
    Kanoe Godby
    www.dyrkgodby.com
    See, I was raised by wolves and am really behind the 8-ball on diplomatic issue resolution.


    2 members found this post helpful.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 9
    Last Post: Jan. 31, 2012, 09:29 PM
  2. Wrapping Paper and Wrapping Gifts...
    By VelvetsAB in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 40
    Last Post: Dec. 26, 2011, 06:42 PM
  3. My horse ate a plastic drinking straw
    By Cheval Gris in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: Jul. 11, 2011, 03:28 PM
  4. Horse eating straw bedding
    By Rebmik in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: Apr. 9, 2010, 07:08 PM
  5. Soaking Alfalfa cubes for a Cushing's horse
    By msj in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: Feb. 17, 2009, 10:22 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness