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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun. 19, 2001
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    3,784

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    The Jenners, if it's a wild tree not an ornamental, it's almost certainly a Big Leaf Maple. Our other common maple here is the Vine Maple, which has a leaf that easily fits on the palm of your hand. There's also a Rocky Mountain Maple, but they're only rarely found in the mountains here. I have seen red stems on my maple leaves; I have 3 or 4 trees. Ok, took a look through "Sibley's Guide to Trees", and the Big Leaf is the only real match in our area. Can you take another photo with a ruler or other common object like a quarter for size comparison? If it's a Big Leaf, I wouldn't worry too much. If they were very toxic, we would probably all know it because they're so common here. The leaves are a pain to rake, so I use a leaf blower. It's much faster.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 1999
    Location
    Someplace Wet
    Posts
    7,999

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    it is Big-leaf Maple; deeply cut,multi veins. It is a small , new leaf. I would not worry too much about any issue with the horses. They do, however, get very large and if you look about they are most likely the second most common deciduous tree around here.

    Walk in any woodlands in the fall and majority of the leaves that will cover over a trail will be Big-leaf
    _\\\\]
    -- * > hoopoe

    www.meanderingwa.blogspot.com



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2002
    Location
    Cow County, MD
    Posts
    6,958

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    Ugh, sure wish they had Leafsnap for Android! I have something ivy-esque that I want to identify before I go tearing into it.
    Life would be infinitely better if pinatas suddenly appeared throughout the day.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    31,436

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sing Mia Song View Post
    Ugh, sure wish they had Leafsnap for Android! I have something ivy-esque that I want to identify before I go tearing into it.
    you can always take a sample to the county extension or a botanical garden or a nursery.

    If you don't like it, go rip it out, chances are, it's nothing rare.

    BTW, English Ivy is considered an invasive species, non-native to the US...and there are over 400 cultivars of it in existence, so many looks to the same plant!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Sep. 29, 2009
    Posts
    2,576

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    Maple, sugar. GREAT for compost rake all you can get. One year we put them in the landscape beds instead of bark, or mulch. Easier than raking up pine mulch which can contain poison ivy seeds.

    Amazing how such a deep pile of leaves goes to nothing over a short period of time.

    We had tons of these when we lived in Kent. We raked truck loads of them. We rake them onto a blue tarp, then either put in the truck bed lined with a blue tarp, or haul directly to wherever we want them to go.

    Some people burn them. STOOPID. Give them to me! And please filter out all dog poop before hand. :-)



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2004
    Location
    Whidbey Is, Wash.
    Posts
    9,719

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kestrel View Post
    The Jenners, if it's a wild tree not an ornamental, it's almost certainly a Big Leaf Maple. Our other common maple here is the Vine Maple, which has a leaf that easily fits on the palm of your hand. There's also a Rocky Mountain Maple, but they're only rarely found in the mountains here. I have seen red stems on my maple leaves; I have 3 or 4 trees. Ok, took a look through "Sibley's Guide to Trees", and the Big Leaf is the only real match in our area. Can you take another photo with a ruler or other common object like a quarter for size comparison? If it's a Big Leaf, I wouldn't worry too much. If they were very toxic, we would probably all know it because they're so common here. The leaves are a pain to rake, so I use a leaf blower. It's much faster.
    And I just happen to remember seeing a blower in the barn...

    Well, the tree was certain here before anything else, that sucker is HUGE. I don't think two of me could hug it.
    Aisha, my heart from 03/06/1986 to 08/22/2008.

    COTH's official mini-donk enabler.
    Odie, aka the Evil Burrito, is on Facebook.



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