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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2004
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    Whidbey Is, Wash.
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    Default Identify this leaf?? And is it bad?

    So I got this off a tree near my horse's paddock today, and came home to check if it was maple or oak.

    I think it's maple, specifically "big leaf maple."

    Agree? Disgree? Thoughts?

    Leaf
    Aisha, my heart from 03/06/1986 to 08/22/2008.

    COTH's official mini-donk enabler.
    Odie, aka the Evil Burrito, is on Facebook.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 10, 2010
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    995

    Default

    yup, maple........bad? well, a few pulled leaves won't hurt your horse, but maple leaves, and most especially , the red maple variety (Acer Rubrum) can cause hemolytic anemia if consumed in large enough amounts......................because of the sweet taste, horses may forgo their regular forage in favor of easily obtained maple leaves, and not having other food in their stomach then compounds the problem......

    not bad enough to cut the tree down, especially if it provides necessary shade/ shelter form elements.....but I would make sure that when Fall arrives and leaves drop, that leaves do not accumulate in paddock, pasture, loafing shed,etc.........the wind often causes lots of leaves to be trapped by fencing, buildings, etc, and that is where the trouble starts........an easy pile of munchies, just have to stand in one place and suck them right down!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 15, 2004
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    Ontario
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    Default

    red maple leaves when dry are bad.



  4. #4
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    Default

    Right but I don't think this is red maple....
    Aisha, my heart from 03/06/1986 to 08/22/2008.

    COTH's official mini-donk enabler.
    Odie, aka the Evil Burrito, is on Facebook.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 15, 2004
    Location
    Ontario
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    Default

    no, it's not. I was just adding to info in the post previous to mine.



  6. #6
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    Aug. 2, 2004
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    Default

    Mkay. Anyone else have any thoughts on this species of maple?
    Aisha, my heart from 03/06/1986 to 08/22/2008.

    COTH's official mini-donk enabler.
    Odie, aka the Evil Burrito, is on Facebook.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
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    Default

    If it is a big leaf maple, the leaves are...big! So if the leaves are like salad plate size or larger, I'd think that is a big leaf maple. My understanding is that they are not toxic to horses. I have big leaf maples all over here, not in the pastures but near enough that the leaves end up in pastures and get eaten occasionally. Not had an issue, but no one ever eats much. The red maples are the ones to beware of.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2000
    Location
    Greenville, MI,
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    11,808

    Default

    That looks like a Sugar maple?
    If it is the deer love to have at them.
    "you can only ride the drama llama so hard before it decides to spit in your face." ?Caffeinated.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 1999
    Location
    Someplace Wet
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    Default

    It appears to be a small leaf of Big Leaf Maple which is a common native...they are everywhere

    picture of the tree would help as would the samaras ( seeds)
    _\\\\]
    -- * > hoopoe

    www.meanderingwa.blogspot.com



  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 27, 2010
    Location
    Texas
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    101

    Default

    There is a free I pad app called Leaf Snap. You just take a picture of a leaf and it will be identified. Cool and free download
    Larry Garner
    Spalding Fly Predators


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug. 10, 2010
    Location
    Western NY
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    Default

    Cool, Larry....will they identify weeds also?



  12. #12
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    Sep. 13, 2002
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    Pacific Northwest
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    Default

    It has been at least a year since I tried the Leaf Snap app but it wasn't very accurate for our local (west coast) species. Maybe it has improved since then.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 10, 2010
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    995

    Default

    yeah, wasn't trying to say it IS red maple, just that the red variety is the most toxic ...
    and from what my vet told me, ALL maples are harmful if enough is eaten, especially on an empty stomach...........and because they all hve a sweet taste, they WILL be consumed in favor of traditional forages, if the horses have that option.........
    again, not bad enough to remove the tree, but don't trim branches and throw them into the horses for a treat,thinking it is a harmless way to dispose of tree trimmings.......



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
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    The rocky part of KY
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    Default

    We had a LOT of big leaf maples where I used to live. That could be a big leaf maple, but I don't recall they had the reddish stem. They were huge, looked like a sycamore leaf only the tree bark and habit were all wrong. It always helps to put a ruler in the picture for size reference. If you go look on google for red maple leaves you'll get a million red, maple, leaves of all species including things that look to me to be liquidambar etc.

    The red maples that I have don't have a lot of divides in the leaf, and they are about three inches across. I haven't chopped any of mine down but I remove fallen branches and what leaves I see. So far not a problem.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  15. #15
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    Feb. 28, 2006
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    The rocky part of KY
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    This is what my red maple leaves look like http://www.waterfordvillage.org/grap...maple-leaf.jpg
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  16. #16
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    Aug. 2, 2004
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    Whidbey Is, Wash.
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    Default

    Well... Yay rake party this autumn!!
    Aisha, my heart from 03/06/1986 to 08/22/2008.

    COTH's official mini-donk enabler.
    Odie, aka the Evil Burrito, is on Facebook.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec. 5, 2001
    Location
    virginia
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    Default

    i thought it was wilted leaves, not the fallen leaves that were toxic. And your horse would need to eat a 33 gallon sz garbage bag of them to have any toxic effect. But I'm no vet. I boarded once in a farm that had maples all along my horse's fence row. So there were leaves in his paddock every fall. The barn owner and i had concerns, spoke to our local vets about it and did a little research and we found that wilted leaves (from downed limbs or trees) were the concern. Not dropped leaves that come down in the fall. Point being that my horse suffered no ill effects. But I don't recall the specific maple tree species that he had on his fenceline. it's been a while.



  18. #18
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    Feb. 28, 2006
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    The rocky part of KY
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    Default

    I do rake, but more to get rid of the leaves off the grass than to "get rid of the leaves". What I pick up are blown down branches and leaves to get the soon to wilt leaves out of there, what I've read says wilted leaves as well, as in green leaves not Fall leaves.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  19. #19
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    Aug. 2, 2004
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    Default

    Oh interesting. I guess wilted versus dry meant something different! Thanks
    Aisha, my heart from 03/06/1986 to 08/22/2008.

    COTH's official mini-donk enabler.
    Odie, aka the Evil Burrito, is on Facebook.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb. 20, 2013
    Posts
    279

    Default

    The "juices" of the leaf have time to withdraw when they fall naturally. When a branch is felled by a storm, the toxins are trapped within the leaves.

    I agree that it's big leaf maple: http://www.maple-trees.com/pages/bigleaf-maple.php


    1 members found this post helpful.

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