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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 8, 2007
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    37

    Default Horse that head shakes - would you buy?

    Hunter/Jumper - 7 years old, no show record to speak of, but very lovely horse. Owner thinks head shaking will have no effect on sale or sale price.

    What do you think?



  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vlong View Post
    Hunter/Jumper - 7 years old, no show record to speak of, but very lovely horse. Owner thinks head shaking will have no effect on sale or sale price.

    What do you think?
    Headshaking can be so mild it's barely noticeable or so severe the horse has to be retired from riding. It can be managed to some degree, sometimes. Or not.

    For a hunter, it's a risk even if mild, since one episode in the ring can drop you out of the ribbons. For a jumper, not as much of an issue.

    I'd expect it to affect price. I might consider a headshaker who is a proven showhorse and schoolmaster type as a learning/step-up horse where ribbons are less important, but I'd pass on an unproven prospect personally.


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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    18,920

    Default

    Would not take a headshaker for free let alone buy. They are a life long hassle at best and a heart breaking euthanasia at worst.


    10 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 24, 2007
    Posts
    837

    Default

    If sold with full disclosure it will certainly affect the price. If not, and the headshaking is seasonal they may get away with not telling, getting the price they ask for and having someone very unhappy with them later...


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 8, 2007
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    37

    Default

    Horse has seasonal (photogenic) head shaking - this is the second year with this issue. Seems to be worse than last year, but is more under control on dex.

    Head shaking not mentioned in sale ad, but she's planning on disclosing to potential buyers.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 5, 2009
    Posts
    1,300

    Default

    Nononononono. Have one that I can manage, but would not knowingly step into that scenario again. Maybe if she pays you lots of money to take it....??? and you have no aspirations at all...


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 31, 2010
    Posts
    100

    Default

    One of my OTTBs is a headshaker. Vet is thinking he is the Trigeminal Headshaker. Started 1 1/2 years after I brought him home. Apparently it manifests between 7-9 years old. It started when he turned 9. He was always touchy about his neck and face but the shaking began later. And it is pretty bad. VERY difficult to ride him since the head flipping will not stop. So we put him on Cyrpoheptadine and like magic, headshaking was minimal. I took him off after a month, just to see and WOW, headshaking was 10x worse and it only took 2 days of no drug.
    Problem with the drug is that it is not legal for shows. I also learned that if he got the drug in his feed, it had some effect. If I squirt into his mouth, amazing results. Zero headshaking for 30-36 hours. Thus every AM I head out with my little syringe of water and cypro, and a dob of honey on the tip. He loves it. Takes it so willingly.

    Right now I have reduced his cypro dose to see how he does. It is a tad pricey at $65 a month but I also want to see if I can show him at some point so seeing if he can be slowly taken off, when does the headshaking begin again and see if a show can be in his future. Since the shaking did start last year around September when I got a load of hay from a different supplier, I still have hopes that it is allergies or anything but a nerve issue. Thus I will keep trying to find a better solution than cypro. We ruled out photic since he kept shaking during the winter.

    Thus if you have your heart set on showing, a headshaker with the trigeminal nerve issue may not be the best choice. IF you are fine with scheduling shows around symptoms, may work but the seller should reduce the price if the horse is a known headshaker.

    IF a photic headshaker, I hear those guys are more manageable and do not need the forbidden drug thus showing is more of an option.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2004
    Location
    Pittsburgh,Pennsylvaina
    Posts
    4,029

    Default

    My mare shakes her head somtimes but when her teeth are done she's fine.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun. 11, 2013
    Location
    U.K.
    Posts
    563

    Default

    Personally, no. Our youngster shakes his head (it's seasonal, we bought him in winter) and he's a lovely horse, don't get me wrong, but it's not worth the stress when there are so many horses out there with no medical issues. I have no doubt it will affect his showing career.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 8, 2011
    Posts
    370

    Default

    Have a friend who has a trail horse with photic headshaking. His is due to seasonal allergies -- he begins when the pollen starts and tapers off throughout the summer. he doesn't do it at all in the winter. He is quite rideable with one of the nose-nets on, impossible without it. Assuming nose-nets are legal in your showing discipline I'd test-ride with the net to see if it worked on him before making a commitment.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 11, 2011
    Posts
    299

    Default

    Having owned a head shaker in the past - and knowing how difficult and debilitating it can be - no, I would not buy a head shaker. I was able to manage him on Cyproheptadine (which is not show legal) and a hair net over his nose... but during the period where we couldn't figure out what was bothering him... it was really very heartbreaking for me.

    Ultimately, I had NO trouble selling him (found a new home for him within a week). I priced him a little lower than I would have otherwise, but the girl who bought him was not bothered at all about the head shaking, and I gave her full disclosure. Did not ask about it, and it has not been an issue for her.


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  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    15,446

    Default

    I would never knowingly take a head shaker...not even for free.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


    4 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2010
    Posts
    2,235

    Default

    I wouldn't take a head shaker for free.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep. 12, 2009
    Posts
    441

    Default

    My heart horse, a homebred nine year old, started headshaking last year. While he has a home for life with me I would never knowingly buy another. Even without the issue of never knowing if/when you can show, for me it's heartbreaking to watch him when he's having tics. His seems allergy-related so far but we're still figuring out his triggers and what works for him. Again, I would never, ever go into it on purpose.
    It's not about the color of the ribbon but the quality of the ride. Having said that, I'd like the blue one please!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2007
    Location
    Illinois, USA
    Posts
    8,106

    Default

    Another vote for wouldn't take one for free. Boarded at a barn with a headshaker once... he would drag his face on the paved driveway to try and get some relief. He was eventually put down.
    Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2012
    Posts
    1,392

    Default

    Nope...pass on this one.
    Ride like you mean it.


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  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep. 4, 2012
    Location
    Southeast US
    Posts
    906

    Default

    Add me to the "I wouldn't take one if they gave it to me" camp. My sister once owned a horse that developed headshaking. None of the standard remedies had much, if any, effect and he was completely unrideable in the spring and summer. Plus, it was just heartbreaking to watch him.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2006
    Posts
    1,889

    Default

    No way.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    May. 20, 2005
    Location
    Thousand Oaks, CA
    Posts
    835

    Default

    Valegro, the Olympic gold medal winner in dressage is reported to be a head shaker. He is for sale, but obviously he has an extensive show record.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar. 19, 2010
    Posts
    224

    Default

    Another vote for no, not even if you paid me. Too heartbreaking.



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