The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 41 to 47 of 47
  1. #41

    Default

    Having lived in Oklahoma, I can tell you that injury from flying debris is much more likely if your horse is OUTSIDE during a storm. If your barn takes a direct hit by a tornado your horses may be injured, but if they are outside and a tornado or violent thunderstorm passes by they are in greater danger.

    Run in sheds don't offer much protection and can become airborne during strong winds. How do I know? My next door neighbor's run in shed went flying over his fence one day during strong straight line winds. Fortunately his horses weren't in or near the shed at the time.



  2. #42
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2008
    Posts
    7,562

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Prime Time Rider View Post
    Having lived in Oklahoma, I can tell you that injury from flying debris is much more likely if your horse is OUTSIDE during a storm. If your barn takes a direct hit by a tornado your horses may be injured, but if they are outside and a tornado or violent thunderstorm passes by they are in greater danger.

    Run in sheds don't offer much protection and can become airborne during strong winds. How do I know? My next door neighbor's run in shed went flying over his fence one day during strong straight line winds. Fortunately his horses weren't in or near the shed at the time.
    Not understanding how these run-ins are going flying...are they not attached to the ground? Mine is pole barn built....and is no more likely to go flying off than my barn I would think. Is it just the roof? Or are they on skids? If they aren't sunk in the ground I agree that is a pretty stupid thing to use for shelter in a windstorm. But I can't see my run-in flying away unless it gets a direct hit.



  3. #43
    Join Date
    May. 28, 2002
    Posts
    2,865

    Default

    Mind stay in. 100+ year bank barn has survived this long, I hope it will survive another 100 years. I know too many horses that have been struck by lightening in thunderstorms too.

    Last June during the derecho (we had 90 mph winds for over an hour) all of mine were out. They were traumatized to say the least. We did not know it was coming and it was too late to get them in once it hit. I am still finding stuff that blew out of my barn that day, almost a year later.



  4. #44
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2004
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Posts
    5,530

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by monalisa View Post
    Last June during the derecho (we had 90 mph winds for over an hour) all of mine were out. They were traumatized to say the least. We did not know it was coming and it was too late to get them in once it hit. I am still finding stuff that blew out of my barn that day, almost a year later.
    That is so scary. One summer we had a storm come through fast (not a derecho) and I got all in but one. I stood under the barn porch and watched him try to keep his footing with the straight winds that were probably 70mph, knocked him to his knees over and over, while pushing him cloer and closer to the electric fence. It was so terrible to watch but he wouldn't move for me and I wasn't able to even see when I tried to get out to get him. Fortunately it only lasted less than 10 minutes! An hour would be exhausting, and I can see why yours were traumatized!



  5. #45
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    20,151

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fordtraktor View Post
    Not understanding how these run-ins are going flying...are they not attached to the ground? Mine is pole barn built....and is no more likely to go flying off than my barn I would think. Is it just the roof? Or are they on skids? If they aren't sunk in the ground I agree that is a pretty stupid thing to use for shelter in a windstorm. But I can't see my run-in flying away unless it gets a direct hit.
    Around here, building code requires hurricane straps on pole barns. We had straight line winds several years ago...snapped my four board 5" fence posts right off at the ground. I saw a building under construction shoved off of its foundation. You can't imagine the damage they can do.

    I remember the farm where we boarded in MD had a hurricane come through...the run-ins were turned upside down. They had supports cemented into the ground.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  6. #46
    Join Date
    Jun. 27, 2010
    Location
    SE VA
    Posts
    1,219

    Default

    Our barn is 12'' concrete block with wire and rebar, and 6'' block interior walls. Metal roof with hurricane straps. For hurricanes, they stay in. For storms where tornadoes are likely, they go out. We do not have run ins and our fencing is electrobraid with 16' wood posts in concrete. So if a tree came down on a fence, it would pull the rope down but I think the risk of an escapee is smaller than with a wood fence.



  7. #47
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2001
    Location
    Center of the Universe
    Posts
    7,362

    Default

    In almost 25 years of open pasture horse keeping I've never, as in NEVER, had an injury to a horse from flying debris. I'm in East TN and we get some hum dinger thunderstorms. Not like OK, IL, or TX to be sure, but not gentle showers either. IMO while the risk is not zero this fear is vastly overblown.
    tornadoes are whole nuther beast.
    We had one come through several years ago- we don't get them very often here. I was outside, and the temp suddenly dropped and the sky went black and there was a sound like a million ton freight train bearing down on you. I ran for the truck and I'm convinced I would have died if I hadn't been cowering inside it- the debris flying around outside the truck was incredible to see, big chunks of trees whizzing wildly around. The truck was rather dented and scratched. I wasn't even in the direct path of the thing. It went through a nearby farm and ripped the side of the indoor arena off. And that was a minor one, barely made the weather reports.
    Maybe places with fewer trees there is less risk of debris damage? most of the debris I watched whirl about appeared to be from trees.



Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: Mar. 10, 2010, 08:35 AM
  2. Major storms coming to Northern California
    By lizathenag in forum Off Course
    Replies: 100
    Last Post: Jan. 27, 2010, 10:40 PM
  3. BROODMARE LEASE GONE TERRIBLY WRONG-OTHER HORSES AT RISK
    By artisticgold in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 100
    Last Post: Jan. 23, 2010, 08:34 PM
  4. Horses, storms and Murphys Law
    By camohn in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: Aug. 23, 2009, 12:51 PM
  5. Replies: 39
    Last Post: May. 13, 2009, 01:01 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness