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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 6, 2004
    Location
    Elkton
    Posts
    4,419

    Default The big storms coming (1 in 5 Americans at risk) where do you put your horses?

    These are the storms I'm talking about

    So now the question... Do you leave horses in or out?

    My set up has a new 12x24 run in shed (Amish built) that can be closed into 2 stalls or left open. I can contain my horses (2 and a mini donk) to the lower part of the pasture or close them in.

    My thoughts are:
    1) Many injuries are caused by flying objects
    2) What if the fence goes down and they get loose?

    but..
    1) Many of the horses in Moore that died were in barns that collapsed.

    What do you guys think?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 27, 2011
    Location
    The Land of Buggies and Black Bumpers
    Posts
    903

    Default

    I have a 40 x 40 pole barn that has 3 stalls set up in part of it and the rest is open like a run in shed. I usually just leave my horses loose in bad weather and let them decide where to be. I have two small sacrifice paddocks attached to this area so I can restrict how far away from the barn they can get.

    I see you are in Elkton. I'm supposed to be camping at Fair Hill starting tomorrow and am debating when to get there now because of the weather!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr. 6, 2004
    Location
    Elkton
    Posts
    4,419

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cutter99 View Post
    I have a 40 x 40 pole barn that has 3 stalls set up in part of it and the rest is open like a run in shed. I usually just leave my horses loose in bad weather and let them decide where to be. I have two small sacrifice paddocks attached to this area so I can restrict how far away from the barn they can get.

    I see you are in Elkton. I'm supposed to be camping at Fair Hill starting tomorrow and am debating when to get there now because of the weather!
    Yes, I'm in hacking distance to Fair Hill. The horse barns at Fair Hill are very sturdy, but who wants to be out in this mess??

    Hopefully the weather takes a turn for the good, like that snow day we had this winter with no snow.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 3, 2002
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    857

    Default

    My horses don't like their run in shed when winds get to ripping and gusty.
    Their natural response is to get out in the open, which they do at first gust.

    During normal storms, stalls are fine but if tornadoes are predicted, I think they're safer outside away from potential flying debris.

    We've been through numerous hurricanes and have never had a fence down from the storm. Unless you have huge trees on your fenceline, I'd be more worried about the flying debris and large hail stones.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 6, 2004
    Location
    Elkton
    Posts
    4,419

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marla 100 View Post

    During normal storms, stalls are fine but if tornadoes are predicted, I think they're safer outside away from potential flying debris.

    We've been through numerous hurricanes and have never had a fence down from the storm. Unless you have huge trees on your fenceline, I'd be more worried about the flying debris and large hail stones.
    They're safer outside from flying debris?



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    19,749

    Default

    There is no right answer, you have to do whatever you feel most comfortable with. For me personally that is inside but I can see the arguments on both sides.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 6, 2012
    Posts
    176

    Default

    I have two adjoining paddocks/pastures with stall access. I always leave mine out and let them decide where they want to be. I would hate for them to become trapped in their stalls and me be unable to reach them.....at least if they're out they have the opportunity to escape....I never know what the right thing to do is. I have a perimeter fence so unless they both get taken out I'm not as worried about them getting off the property.

    On a side note when we had fires scary close to our barn a few years ago I did take the precaution of putting halters on mine with my name and phone number in black sharpie just in case. Or you can paint it on their rumps. If it's going to be really bad in your area you may consider doing that -


    2 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2009
    Posts
    4,553

    Default

    I'm in the Milwaukee area. My horse lives at a boarding facility, and all of the horses will be kept inside their stalls inside the (well-built, sturdy) barns.

    I personally think that with storms (even strong storms), there is a bigger risk in being out, getting hit by debris or hail, struck by lightning, getting terrified and running through fences, etc. than there is of being inside a barn.

    If something like a strong tornado hits the barn directly, then, yes, they are obviously all screwed. However, if a tornado hits the barn directly, they would also be screwed in their nearby paddocks, which are right next to the barns and don't really provide a lot of places to take cover.

    I might feel differently if we were talking about a 40 acre field with treelines, hills, etc., but that's not at all what is available here.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2012
    Posts
    2,140

    Default

    I bring mine into the barn. The chance of a total disaster are slim, in general.

    But hail, lightening, wind and driving rain are all too predictable. No one knows when The Big One will come but the little stuff comes all the time. I want them with a roof over their heads.
    Ride like you mean it.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2002
    Location
    Zone 6
    Posts
    1,881

    Default

    Mine stay inside a well built barn but many in the midwest prefer to turn them out.
    https://www.facebook.com/HunterHillFarmIowa

    Oh my god - she's gone and got the eventing bug! I will send you some antibiotics! Take the entire bottle and do two hunter shows and it will pass!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 24, 2010
    Posts
    514

    Default

    IN.

    I am at peace if anything happens to my horses while they are in a solid and secure barn. Outside, I've always feared lightning, flying objects, and fences down. I saw video of Oklahoma horses being led across I-40 because they got out of pastures during the tornadoes. Yes the barn could collapse and many other bad things could happen to them in their stalls. But I decided many decades ago that my horses, like my family of humans and dogs and cats, stay IN during storms.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct. 5, 2009
    Location
    Where the blacktop ends-Maryland
    Posts
    445

    Default

    Ok MD COTHers fill me in, live in northern Carroll co. But currently in NC. DD home with horses. Weather channel and WBAL don't really have anything alarming other than flash floods. Is there something I should make DD aware of?
    "They spend 11 months stuggling to live, and 25 years trying to die" my farrier

    "They are dangerous on both ends and crafty in the middle"



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 3, 2012
    Location
    Hudson Valley, NY
    Posts
    99

    Default

    I don't know what the right thing to do is, but when we had hurricane and tornado warnings last year, the BO turned the horses out with breakaway halters and braided ribbons into their manes which had the horses name and the BO's mobile phone number written in Sharpie (in case the halters came off). Fortunately, all was fine.
    "A good man will take care of his horses and dogs, not only while they are young, but also when they are old and past service." Plutarch


    2 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2008
    Posts
    7,298

    Default

    Out(ish) here. I have strong run-in shelters which my wimpy horses actually use in rain...but if a tornado comes through, I think out is safer and they could run away if they chose. At least they might have some chance instead of no chance at all.

    Also, lightning can set barns on fire. The best ground rod can fail.

    I did cut down all the trees in my paddock after a neighbor lost 15 cattle in one strike. I have lots of trees next to the fields but not in them, and not close enough the horses stand under them.

    And sometimes I get indecisive in the face of a storm and put them in. Who knows. Today they are staying out.

    Stay safe, everyone. I don't think there is a right answer here. Good luck to all of us.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    19,749

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SPF10 View Post
    Ok MD COTHers fill me in, live in northern Carroll co. But currently in NC. DD home with horses. Weather channel and WBAL don't really have anything alarming other than flash floods. Is there something I should make DD aware of?
    I don't know about your area specifically but most of MD is in the bullseye for a possible Derecho tomorrow.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep. 8, 2011
    Posts
    411

    Default

    Mine will be in, due mainly to the hail. We were in the derecho last year and I was amused to watch my daughters chickens pop in and out of their house during lulls in the wind (chickens apparently don't listen to the frothy weather reports from WTOP. Or perhaps the worms were surfacing.) Our field horses put themselves into the run-ins during the worst rain and we encouraged that by stashing some tasty alfalfa mix inside so they had something to do. Stalled horses were in the barn with the windows and doors shut, stuffing THEIR faces. No-one seemed particularly bothered.

    Now if anyone has any suggestions about protecting fruit trees and vegetable plants from the weather I'd love to hear them...



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    17,494

    Default

    Mine stay in. I have a very well built barn. I'm hearing that straight line winds will be part of this storm. Several years ago, we had a freak storm in February with straight line winds. It snapped off 4 sections of fence posts at the ground. Horses got out into the neighbor's yard, thankfully, the neighbors had their gates closed and thankfully, they missed the pool when they were turfing the lawn.

    Now I always keep them in. You have to worry about cloud to ground lightning as well and flying debris.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Nov. 14, 2011
    Location
    racetrack
    Posts
    1,477

    Default

    Inside for sure. A well built barn will shelter them from debri, and even in the event of a tornado hitting or coming close you have the barn walls then another layer of protection in the stalls themself. The barn has to take a direct hit to kill them, debri can come from a storm miles away. Having lived in Texas for a good time I can tell you that hail usually precedes a tornado (again even one miles away).

    I've helped my vet with a herd of horses that were left out during a tornado, it isn't pretty. They were all outside. Two lived, all the rest ended up put down. The DEBRI os what killed them. In that same
    storm mine were in the barn and totally unharmed.

    The recent tornado that killed so many horses at Celestial Acres was an exception to all rules, however those barns were older and getting rather delapidated.

    "Pat the horse; kick yourself" - Carl Hester



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov. 14, 2011
    Location
    racetrack
    Posts
    1,477

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SomedaySoon View Post
    I don't know what the right thing to do is, but when we had hurricane and tornado warnings last year, the BO turned the horses out with breakaway halters and braided ribbons into their manes which had the horses name and the BO's mobile phone number written in Sharpie (in case the halters came off). Fortunately, all was fine.
    The ribbon idea is VERY smart, in or out! Thanks for sharing!

    "Pat the horse; kick yourself" - Carl Hester



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul. 16, 2004
    Posts
    40

    Default

    I bring my guys in. Lost a really nice horse a few back to lightning - never again! The winds can cause a pine cone to become a missle, not to mention sheet metal, and other debris flying around.



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