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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2013
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    10

    Default Eventing on a serious budget...can it be done??

    We all know not everyone can buy a $35,000 horse to pack us around Prelim, but can you ever be successful, at any level, while on a serious budget?

    Listening to some people talk to other night really made me want to throw in the towel. They were discussing board prices ($700+) not including training. UL trainers who charge $80 for a lesson plus a $25 haul in fee. There is no way we can afford even a fraction of that. DH would choke if he heard board prices that high, let alone saw me write a check for one! If I had to pay that kind of money for lessons, I would be able to squeeze in one, MAYBE two a month.

    DH and I make decent money, but we are trying to pay off debt and save some money. I have a nice horse, I'm a capable rider, but I feel like I will be spinning my wheels at some point because I won't be able to campaign him 6+ times a year. I don't want to consistently be at the bottom of the level. I certainly don't expect to win, but after seeing some Novice scores in the 20's this weekend, I was even further discouraged.

    Advice? Thoughts? I'm just feeling really overwhelmed, disheartened, and drained right now. I KNOW horses are expensive; I've been riding for almost fifteen years, but only started eventing a couple of years ago. I'm lucky and have lots of schooling shows and CT that are local, but I love the challenge and excitement of rated shows. I'm okay with doing three or four big shows a year, but I just feel like I won't get anywhere by doing that.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    May. 24, 2011
    Posts
    455

    Default

    I don't know that I have any advice but I'll say you're not alone. I had been struggling half on my own doing lessons when I could afford them for the last four years. Throw in a couple of Navy deployments and crazy work schedules and I didn't get a whole lot done towards my goal of a recognized BN. Then last September my mare became unsound which pretty much ended my riding on a regular basis. I finally made the decision to retire her this past spring when everything the vet and I did could not get her sound. I don't have the money to buy a made eventer and I don't have the heart left in me to get another OTTB because I'm afraid of the heartbreak and disappointment if I get another that has unsoundness issues. So I feel your pain. I am stuck in rider limbo. One horse that's unsound, the other is my husbands very green trail horse that has done some not nice things while I've been riding him so I don't feel confident riding him. And I feel guilty for being unhappy because there are so many people who want a horse but can't have one, and both of mine are in my backyard. Yet right now I feel like you do that I'll never get where I want to go, and all my eventing friend's facebook posts make me both happy and depressed. So from one discouraged rider to another *HUG*
    "But I have promises to keep and miles to go before I sleep." Robert Frost

    Eventing at Midnight Blog
    http://eventingmidnight.blogspot.com/


    2 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2007
    Posts
    2,324

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    I think you can still go out and do some recognized shows and have fun! But yes.. it does make it harder to get points or qualify if that's the end goal. I would say go do the schooling stuff and find places that are good quality schooling shows and run like recognized events. Do you have a local DCTA (dressage and combined training association)? They often have points and awards for the schooling shows, so that's a way to feel like you've accomplished something if you want an end goal or year end goal.


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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2007
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    2,324

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    And as an aside.... try stabling at other farms and hauling in the for the day. That saves money sometimes. If you're a good braider, you can braid for others possibly and help offset some costs. Or offer to groom for your coach in exchange for coaching. Or get your lessons in at home and then just remember all that and don't have a coach at the show itself. I used to do that all the time.. and now it's kind of weird to have a coach at the shows. Camp out in the trailer rather than get a hotel room.... There are all sorts of ways to cut costs to help make it a bit more bearable.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 28, 2003
    Location
    Dundurn, SK
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    2,326

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    I guess it all depends on what you want to do. For me I want to enjoy my horse and get out and have fun. I no longer what to jump the big things. So am happy doing the small stuff. My goal this year is to do one main event. I would love to do more but the money is just not there and see as I have to leave the island (ferry ride) to do any eventing I have to plan out my year well. As just to leave the island and return is a $300 bill with my trailer.

    There are a few things happening on the island this year and I have put them on my list. A eventing clinic on the island, One off island, and the event I want to do. There are a few small shows and I am hauling every 2nd week for a lesson.

    Like you we are trying to pay off debt. I have $650 a month for my horse, board is $450 a month that leave me with $200 for the farrier, lessons and show. Oh and don't forget all the membership fees one has to have to show. The only saving grace is that my BO goes out of town and pays me to look after the horses. If I didn't have that I wouldn't be able to lesson and show.

    I guess it all comes down to what you want more. Showing or less debt. I want to have money when we retire so that I can have my horse. So I am willing to cut out the big shows so that I can still ride when I am in my 50's & 60's.
    Are you going to cowboy up or lie there and BLEED?



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2012
    Posts
    83

    Default

    I'd really like to think it can be done on a budget. Here are a couple of thoughts based on a number of years I spent with about zero budget.

    Seek out good but less well known and therefore hopefully cheaper trainers. I would look up the local list of upper level Pony Club instructors. I know Pony Club is different to competing, but some of the best instructors I've had were from the PC system and not BNR riders. You can then save up for less frequent lessons with the fancy instructors to put polish on things or to advise on competition tactics.

    What about joining a PC Horsemasters program? PC tends to provide lots of activities but much more cheaply. I don't know much about their adult program but might be worth a look.

    Ride share to events if possible. Are you within reach of one day events so you don't have to pay for stabling?

    Can you board somewhere cheaper with less facilities and then hack or trailer somewhere else and hire the ring if you need something more?

    You could try working off your board or part of it, but I suspect that would be too much if you have a full time job.

    Read lots of books.

    Video tape your training rides and try and self-critique. Similarly video your competition rides if possible and then review them with your instructor. Personally I don't think you need a trainer with you at ever event (of course it would be nice, but probably too pricey!) and videoing is a way to get feedback without paying for someone on the ground.

    Pretend the schooling shows and CT events are the real deal. Fine tune your competition strategy there so you can make the most out of the rated shows.

    Hope that helps and good luck!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
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    Default

    What are your goals, exactly, and do you have the right horse to meet those goals? What, specifically, do you mean by "not getting anywhere"? Knowing where one is going, precisely, can help a lot in recognizing when one has gotten there.

    If the goal is "be as competitive as possible at Novice" then you are going to need a very, very good dressage scoring horse, because Novice generally will have the lowest scores of all the levels, and there are hardly ever giant shakeups in the jumping phases.

    If your goal is to safely move up the levels, then a been-there-done-that packer in the twilight of his or her career can be a fantastic partner and need not cost 5 figures, if you're willing to accept a partner with some deficiencies somewhere.

    If your goal is to event with THIS HORSE, assess honestly the horse's capabilities and shortcomings, and spend your limited resources on making those things better. Choose your shows and wisely and it's possible to get out there and event on a budget, although not with NO money. It is a given that horses are just expensive.

    Do you not enjoy the unrecognized events in your area? They can give you a great deal of ability to show with generally MUCH smaller fees, and sometimes over the same courses as the recognized shows.

    Does your trainer go to events often? Would he/she be able to work out a deal with you to ride some horses at home in return for the occasional trip to a show or a break on board? Can you trailer pool?

    I think it's dumb to say "where there's a will there's a way" because sometimes there is NOT. But if you align your goals with reality, and mentally get yourself to a point where those goals are embraced and not resented, you can have a lot of fun eventing. I make enough money to support my horse habit, but TIME is the currency I lack. So I spent a lot of time thinking about the realities of this, made my goals realistic, and enjoy myself enormously at Novice and Training, sometimes going to 1-2 shows a year but always feeling like I'm a part of the sport by doing other stuff in addition to competing. I don't personally care much about being competitive score-wise (which is not to say I don't care at all, it's just not what makes me feel happy or successful) which helps a lot!
    Click here before you buy.


    8 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 27, 1999
    Location
    Midland, NC, USA
    Posts
    7,240

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    I've had students win through Preliminary, qualify for the AECs etc. on horses in the price range of free to $3000, board here is $250 for pasture and $400 for stall, lessons just went up to $50. One of the girls works off lessons and hauling to shows.

    I think most horses are capable of low 30s (physically, anyway) at novice, and while that won't win very often it will keep you away from the bottom of the pack at most shows....

    Jennifer



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec. 23, 2010
    Posts
    79

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    What are your goals, exactly, and do you have the right horse to meet those goals? What, specifically, do you mean by "not getting anywhere"? Knowing where one is going, precisely, can help a lot in recognizing when one has gotten there.

    If the goal is "be as competitive as possible at Novice" then you are going to need a very, very good dressage scoring horse, because Novice generally will have the lowest scores of all the levels, and there are hardly ever giant shakeups in the jumping phases.

    If your goal is to safely move up the levels, then a been-there-done-that packer in the twilight of his or her career can be a fantastic partner and need not cost 5 figures, if you're willing to accept a partner with some deficiencies somewhere.

    If your goal is to event with THIS HORSE, assess honestly the horse's capabilities and shortcomings, and spend your limited resources on making those things better. Choose your shows and wisely and it's possible to get out there and event on a budget, although not with NO money. It is a given that horses are just expensive.

    Do you not enjoy the unrecognized events in your area? They can give you a great deal of ability to show with generally MUCH smaller fees, and sometimes over the same courses as the recognized shows.

    Does your trainer go to events often? Would he/she be able to work out a deal with you to ride some horses at home in return for the occasional trip to a show or a break on board? Can you trailer pool?

    I think it's dumb to say "where there's a will there's a way" because sometimes there is NOT. But if you align your goals with reality, and mentally get yourself to a point where those goals are embraced and not resented, you can have a lot of fun eventing. I make enough money to support my horse habit, but TIME is the currency I lack. So I spent a lot of time thinking about the realities of this, made my goals realistic, and enjoy myself enormously at Novice and Training, sometimes going to 1-2 shows a year but always feeling like I'm a part of the sport by doing other stuff in addition to competing. I don't personally care much about being competitive score-wise (which is not to say I don't care at all, it's just not what makes me feel happy or successful) which helps a lot!
    Really well said. When I was a broke college student I did self-care at a two stall backyard barn that was down the road from a big show barn. I was able to hack to lessons with a BN jumper trainer. She really helped with both xc and stadium. Dressage I practiced in a big field and I knew I was doing things right if my scores got better. Never schooled xc as there was nothing near me. I also was fortunate to have friends with trailers who let me go with them and one family who let me sleep in their trailer's living quarters while they stayed at a hotel. I never had coaching at an event and my friends and I helped each other with grooming.

    I was able to successfully compete at the prelim. level but I did have a very talented and brave horse (one who I brought up the levels), and wouldn't have had the success I did if it weren't for him.

    Try not to get caught up in what others are doing and spending as you will get discouraged. You don't have to ride with a top BNT unless you are going upper level. Try mixing in unrecognized events with maybe some dressage and jumper shows and then do a recognized event. The exposure to different disciplines will keep you both fresh and in the competition ring.

    You can do it, but you are going to need to be disciplined and self-motivated.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 10, 2007
    Location
    too far from the barn
    Posts
    5,586

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    When I first came back to eventing as an adult, I was able to find a great boarding barn at around $400 per month, work some of that off and part leased my horse to help with both time and money management (as I finished paying off student loans, etc). The horse was an OTTB purchased for $2500. I ended up selling him and the horse I then bought (for $4200), I was able to do a lot on, including 2 long format CCI*. He was often near last after dressage, but pretty much always finished on his dressage score and I had a blast with him (at 21, he is now helping the woman who was our barn manager when I got him get back into eventing).
    OTTBs rule, but spots are good too!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
    Location
    Middleburg, VA
    Posts
    12,901

    Default

    I've been able to (mostly) compete my horse regularly at training and prelim all while being a walking financial nightmare (read: budget? What's a budget? Let's go out to dinner....again!). I am, quite literally, in the middle of coming to terms with adulthood and working on a budget for myself, so, hopefully, competing will become a little less painful to my checkbook

    I don't make a lot of money, at all. But I do have two big benefits:
    1. I live, work, and compete in the heart of Area 2. My competition expenses RARELY involve more than just the entry fee and some fuel (and rarely more than half a tank). I have 2, maybe 3 events this year that will require stabling, and with this whole budgeting thing, I'm already starting to think about that stuff.
    2. I have no debt and despite the fact that I spend money like a crazy person, I really live pretty simply.My biggest splurge (I don't count my horse as a splurge ) is going out to eat with friends...and we're not talking fancy dinners. More like "let's go to the pub in our britches" kinda dinners.


    But, I think, if you're realistic and smart, you can do it. One interesting idea I've seen recently was a pro I know who recently bought a young horse that I was involved with said that she won't compete him recognized until he's going training. She's saving a lot of money by doing that, and because we have so many high quality unrecognized events, he's still getting the mileage over good, quality courses. I think this is a good way to save pennies if you are moving up through the lower levels. You have to get a little more creative once you start wanting to qualify for three days and the like, though.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2001
    Location
    Hangin' on by a thread...
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    3,326

    Default

    Everybody has chimed in with some really good responses here, but I thought I'd offer another bit of advice.

    I, too, event on a very tight budget, in the land of the So. Pines millionaires (yes, I realize that not everybody in So. Pines is wealthy, but a good percentage of them ARE). Some things that I do to save money:

    1. I work off part of my board. I have to board at a barn with lights, as I work full-time and sometimes don't make it out to the barn until after dark. So, that means that I pay upwards of $700/month for board, but I work two weekends a month and that helps bring my board down to a reasonable range for me.

    2. Make every lesson you can afford COUNT. If you can't afford more than two lessons a month, get somebody to tape them for you. Or, barring that option, WRITE DOWN everything you learned in journal, online blog, etc. Don't lesson around - stick with ONE program until it no longer works for you. Taking a la carte lessons from various people will only confuse you if their teaching styles/riding styles vary from each other.

    3. Figure out where your weaknesses are and go spend time at schooling shows to work on them. For example, I have a stadium phobia. I score reasonably well in dressage (high 20s to low 30s, on average) - not well enough to win at Novice/BN but good enough for a ribbon at the end of the day, and we're always clean (knock on wood) XC, so I have decided, with the help of this BB, to focus on my stadium jumping. That means, for me, no HTs until we've gotten a handle on this. For the cost of one HT, I can do two jumper schooling shows.

    4. Don't go to recognized shows until you are darn sure you can be in the ribbons afterwards (if you are competitive in nature, which I am). Spend your time at the unrecognized stuff until you are rock solid in all three phases, and THEN budget for a recognized show. Unrecognized shows cost roughly half of a recognized one. Of course, if the unrecognized stuff in your area is not safe, this may not be an option for you.

    5. If you do not already own a trailer, I suggest getting one. Yes, this is expensive, but in the long run, you will save money by owning your own transportation. Not having a trailer means paying somebody to haul you everywhere, which severely limits where you can go. ignore this is you already have transportation.

    6. Audit everything you can, even other people's lessons from your coach. Information, for the most part, is FREE, and if you go watch everything and take along a notebook, you'll be surprised at how much you learn.

    7. If you can't afford to compete, volunteer as a scribe or jump judge. Again, the learning opportunities are priceless and will only help you in competitions.

    HTH! I know what it's like, and it's frustrating at times, but you have to keep in mind WHY you do this sport. Focusing on your individual goals and meeting them is far easier and less frustrating than ribbon and point chasing. Good luck!
    "Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison

    So, the Zen Buddhist says to the hotdog vendor, "Make me one with everything."



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
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    West Coast of Michigan
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    Don't go to recognized shows until you are darn sure you can be in the ribbons afterwards
    I'd still be waiting to go to my first recognized show if I followed this rule . . . and I've been eventing since 1995! Ribbons are never a sure thing. Sometimes you wind up with a blue with 3 mediocre rides, sometimes you've had the best weekend with that horse ever and you end up in 9th place. I compete mostly at recognized shows because that's where my friends are, that's where my barn goes, I like to support the USEA venues, and the quality is more consistent. Plus, you just never know when the planets might align for a pleasant surprise when the final scores are posted.
    Click here before you buy.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2010
    Location
    VA--> Washington (state)
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    347

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    Quote Originally Posted by yellowbritches View Post
    [*]I live, work, and compete in the heart of Area 2. My competition expenses RARELY involve more than just the entry fee and some fuel (and rarely more than half a tank). My biggest splurge (I don't count my horse as a splurge ) is going out to eat with friends...and we're not talking fancy dinners. More like "let's go to the pub in our britches" kinda dinners.
    .
    I used to live in middleburg too so understand the breeches at dinner. Too bad people look at me bug-eyed here!

    My two cents as someone on crutches is that there are ways to do it expensively, moderately, budget and then wonder-bread outlet cheap. Right now, is there any way you could ride with a local trainer on THEIR horse- whether a schoolmaster, project or whatever- so you can ride until the right horse comes along? I have been fortunate enough to do that since moving to this wacky state & not having a barn in my backyard. Now, it took me a while to find this setup since Im not riding a "lesson horse" but it's working. With you made retired and your husband horse being naughty, it could keep you in the game and maybe give you time to do ground work with the green monster in your paddock.
    And the wise, Jack Daniels drinking, slow-truck-driving, veteran TB handler who took "no shit from no hoss Miss L, y'hear," said: "She aint wrapped too tight."



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2001
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    Hangin' on by a thread...
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    3,326

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    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    I'd still be waiting to go to my first recognized show if I followed this rule . . . and I've been eventing since 1995! Ribbons are never a sure thing.

    DW - the only reason why I wrote this is because OP sounded like she wanted to be very competitive, and if you aren't scoring in the low 30s at a recognized show, you probably won't place. I realize that judging varies wildly, but if you don't want to be frustrated at spending $200+ at a recognized show, only to be in the bottom half of the class after dressage, then work on the dressage at home and then spend your money on the recognized shows. Again, it was just advice, that's all.
    "Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison

    So, the Zen Buddhist says to the hotdog vendor, "Make me one with everything."


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
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    Azle, Teh-has
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    7,725

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    I've been eventing on a 40K salary my whole life.

    I boarded at a place that was basically pasture. So it was only $300 a month or something like that.

    OTTBs
    no lessons.
    no trainer at shows.
    camp at shows.
    no going out to eat.

    and I would pet sit/house sit on the side.
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!


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  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 1999
    Location
    Mendocino County, CA: Turkey Vulture HQ
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    14,432

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    If your goal is to have fun, I think eventing is a sport where you can have a lot of fun without spending a lot of money, especially if you come to the table already safe and capable.

    Your specific circumstances will make a big difference - how far you are from cross country courses, the capabilities of your horse, whether you already have a truck and trailer, how much time you have, etc.

    Most people lack time. If you have time, that can substitute in for a lot of money.

    I am at a level where it's more valuable for me to have really good instruction less often - so when I was still eventing regularly, I was doing it with a dressage lesson once a week and a really good eventing instructor once a month. Then I did my homework in between. I worked on getting my horse fit, I did the exercises, and so I was able to progress pretty well on that kind of schedule. Each lesson was expensive but by having fewer lessons the cost stayed down.

    The one thing is that you must stay safe. That may mean that if your horse or your instruction time is limited, that you can't move up. There is still a lot of fun to be had competing at lower levels or going out schooling.
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    5,231

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    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    Do you not enjoy the unrecognized events in your area? They can give you a great deal of ability to show with generally MUCH smaller fees, and sometimes over the same courses as the recognized shows.

    I think it's dumb to say "where there's a will there's a way" because sometimes there is NOT. But if you align your goals with reality, and mentally get yourself to a point where those goals are embraced and not resented, you can have a lot of fun eventing. ...always feeling like I'm a part of the sport by doing other stuff in addition to competing. I don't personally care much about being competitive score-wise (which is not to say I don't care at all, it's just not what makes me feel happy or successful) which helps a lot!
    This stuff is excellent and HUGE to me. I'm with purp -- and with two horses and a mortgage that is a SERIOUS budget. One is an Appendix QH, the other is a CANTER OTTB, both were gifts.

    I also pasture board (although I hate stalling horses anyway, so I would preferentially choose that). I take VERY few lessons (maybe 8-10 per year). Clinics I only go to if they are kind gifts. I don't really do anything else, no meals out, no non-horse travel, no shopping (but I don't really want to either). I do both rec and unrec events (3-5 per year), but like dw, I'm there for the experience and to test my horse and I, don't care about ribbons -- it's just the only way I can run an XC course, hee. And I am a hardcore volunteer, esp. for the long format.

    I cannot emphasize enough, do NOT compare yourself with other people, it will only drag you down, as you've observed. I got an amazing gift this year to go spend 10 days with Becky Holder -- with me there were 3-4 girls in their 20s, a couple with swanky horses, etc. Don't get me wrong, they were AWESOME and worked really hard, but that was never an opportunity I had when I was in school or as a kid and I will never be able to afford to live that life of horse trials and training and etc etc. I think the reason I've kept going and maintained my love of the sport is that even in my own heartbreaks, I always kept the focus on MY journey because I know that I just will never be competitive with someone who can take 2 lessons a week and ride multiple horses a day and focus solely on that.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2013
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    10

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    Thank you, everyone. I understand my first post wasn't very clear, but my emotions were getting the best of my fingers.

    I would love to go Prelim one day. I like to think I would be brave enough for Intermediate, but I don't think one really knows that until you are approaching that jump. Just my opinion! I have been told by a couple different trainers (one a BNR and another used to be a BNR several years ago) that they love my horse and he has the scope for Prelim. We are schooling BN right now, so of course that is a big leap. All kinds of things could happen first...he could go unsound (another fear, just me being paranoid), he could not be brave enough for Prelim, etc. He is a very nice-moving horse as well, so I consider myself especially lucky to have him.

    I am currently working off part of my board, which makes it affordable for me. I'm also not boarding at a $700/month place, but it is nice. The situation I am in currently is mostly working well, I just feel like I'm not able to compete as much as I would like due to time and money constraints. I'm more so worrying about the future, if something changes or we move, which is likely with DH's job. I have done self-care and boarded at less than stellar places as long as they were safe, and I am fine with that.

    I utilize schooling shows in my immediate area, and they are well-run and offer year end prizes. I am okay with going to only 3 recognized shows a year, but I do want to make the most out of the three I go to! I agree I shouldn't compare, but I admit to being weak in that aspect. I hear people talk to importing horses, moving up the ranks, etc and I just wonder how the rest of us can compete with people on an (seemingly) endless budget.

    DH and I don't spend a lot of money on useless things. We are trying to slowly improve our home, pay off the truck (which needs to be upgraded for safe towing), save some money, and have some left over at the end of each month. We talked about putting a trailer purchase on our list at the end of the year, but after a couple close calls hauling a friends trailer with our truck, we are considering upgrading the truck first and using my trainer's old trailer (which she has been gracious enough to offer several times).

    I appreciate the support. And I know I just need to focus on me, my horse, and OUR goals, but it does get frustrating sometimes. My family is non-horsey, and not all of my horse friends are eventers, so COTH is the place to turn for this kind of venting!



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr. 10, 2011
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    436

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    I think the first mistake is to think you need to import of spend $35k on a horse... That is just CRAZY!!!!!!!!!!!! I think if your trainers like your horse and think she has potential, go with it.

    I don't think a fancy stable is necessary either. I have alot of friends in scotland and they don't have fancy barns, they don't have arenas. They ride in rain, mud etc etc and their idea of BN is our idea of pre-training/training!

    I think you just need to make the best of what you have. I would definately take a less-fancy stable to be able to show more.
    "My ideal horse is the horse that I fall in love with again every morning when I see his face hanging over the stable door, looking for breakfast. " - Jim Wofford


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