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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 25, 2005
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    MA
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    1,058

    Default UPDATE AT END: How to relocate/discourage/repel Garter snake from a small area?

    Namely, the bush that the cardinals made a next in right outside my kitchen window. If I have to go outside one more time to remove the snake from the bush or scare it away I'm going to scream.

    There are 3 eggs and so far the snake hasn't eaten any. I keep checking and there are still 3, and mama comes back after I scare the snake away and then go back in the house. I figured the snake was after the eggs, but I watched him in the nest once, and he nosed the eggs around and then curled up on top of them! WTF!!
    Last edited by Ruth0552; Jun. 10, 2013 at 03:26 PM.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Ocala, FL
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    1,815



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2005
    Location
    Mass.
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    6,640

    Default

    I don't think the snake is going to eat the eggs, but that part about it being in the nest was odd. Next time it's in the nest, just pick it up and take it for a ride down the road aways.

    Edit: Don't kill it - they're very good snakes to have around!
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
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    Default

    I don't think the garter snake CAN eat the eggs - I guess it depends on how big he, I guess. It sounds like he has a secret longing since he did not get to evolve into a bird like his ancient cousins did, LOL! Perhaps it's the nanny?


    2 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
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    2,966

    Default

    It's definitely NOT a Garter Snake (non-climbing fish & insect eater), but most likely a Black Rat Snake (bird's eggs, nestlings, rodents, etc.).

    Regardless of how many times you remove the snake, chances are the birds will vacate that specific area & build a nest elsewhere.

    Just let nature take its course.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
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    Default

    Is it stripey? Great snake ID guide from UMass here -- I actually did not know there were that many species that far north (looks like I am more afraid of winter than reptiles, heh).

    http://www.masnakes.org/guide.html



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 25, 2005
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    MA
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    Default

    I checked out the snake link- definitely a garter snake. The nest isn't in a tree, it's in a bush- only a couple feet off the ground.

    I don't want to kill him. I don't think he wants to eat the eggs either- he just chilling in the nest! At one point I thought maybe he wanted to eat mama, but she's been around, tweeting at him, and he hasn't tried to eat her.

    I actually had a Robin make a nest in that bush several years ago and they did have babies. Unfortunately, a snake, I swear it is the same one, at one of them before I realized what was happening. Not as concerned about a Robin honestly, but now I have Cardinals!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2009
    Location
    Texas Hill Country
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    595

    Default

    Looks like you've got a case of natural selection on your hands. Painful to watch, no doubt, but a useful reminder of the indifference of the cosmos, both to human preferences of one bird over another, and to the birds themselves.
    Dreadful Acres: the chronicle of my extraordinary unsuitability to country life


    2 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
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    12,238

    Default

    Smart snake knowledge people - is the snake waiting for the babies to hatch or something?



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 15, 2008
    Posts
    2,826

    Default

    or the eggs are warm and the snake's treating them like an electric rock?

    but yes, just scoop him up and drive him into the next county.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Gravity works, and the laws of physics are a bitch.

    Member: Rabid Garden Snail Clique



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2012
    Posts
    482

    Default

    What about the possibilty that the cold-blooded snake is seeking warmth from the eggs?



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2005
    Location
    The Prairie
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    Default

    I know you checked but can it really be a garter snake? Did not know they could climb. While I am generally on Team Garter Snake I too would find it hard to just do nothing. What about putting moth balls around the base of the bush?
    I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
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    A garter snake can certainly climb a low bush -- he's just not going to scale tree trunks. Although it is sad for us to see a baby bird be eaten, think of it this way: snakey makes babies (really cute ones!) too and needs nourishment and energy to stay alive and keep being neat. I have never seen one napping on eggs though, perhaps he is stealing a bit of warmth -- in June though, one would think he could find a sunny spot here and there!

    Cardinals are also heinously common, so he's not snatching up, like, baby whooping cranes. All the same, native wildlife eating native wildlife is fine. This is exactly why these birds have multiple babies -- the lucky and the clever make it to saavy adulthood.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 25, 2005
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    MA
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    Got home from work and while mama bird was cooking eggs when I left his morning, she isn't anymore. No sign of eggs, mama, or papa Cardinal. No sign of snake either for that matter...

    Do Cardinals move their eggs? Or is it more likely the snake ate them? I figured he would eat them but he was moving them around earlier and still hadn't eaten them!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2005
    Location
    Mass.
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    Oh dear, that doesn't sound good.
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2005
    Location
    Mass.
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    BTW, Wildlifer, cardinals are very unusual up here. Not common at all!
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
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    Oh oh, I can mail you a couple hundred? And that's just from my yard.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    Canada
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    We have lots of garter snakes in our garden. One has taken up residence by our pond and been there I think for three years. He swims, he climbs into the juniper bush, he suns on the rocks surrounding the pond and has a nice little habitat. He is really long - perhaps 3'. Last summer I heard this gawd-awful shrieking enough to curdle the blood. Ran over and he had a fairly large frog by the back leg. Nature doing what Nature does, until I intervene. I reached down and he let the frog go and it leapt away, I hope not any the worse for wear.
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique



  19. #19
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    Mar. 16, 2006
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    Larkspur, Colo.
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    Default

    Maybe the eggs hatched and the snake ate the babies. Yummy!



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
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    First off - it wasn't a Garter Snake (they come in MANY different color patterns - not just "striped"). They are strictly fish, amphibian, & insect eaters - no warm-blooded animals (or eggs). And they're groundwelling - don't care for trees/shrubs.

    However, any member of the Rat Snake clan (which also come in many different color patterns) happily climb, & even more happily eat both eggs &/or nestlings, which is most likely what happened in this case. It's doubtful the parents will return - in my experience birds won't reuse a nest for a new clutch once it's been tainted by a predator.



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