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  1. #1
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    Default Lady E: Re video of the good gait.

    You had once mentioned some videos that gave a good explanation of the intermediate gaits. They were good - like you said.

    In them they spoke about the pick up of the pairs and the speakers disagreed a little on what was shown as to whether it was a good running walk verses getting a little lateral (step pace).

    Below is a video from some folks that sell/train nice walking type horses. At about 1:25 they will show the blue horse doing his walking gaits. The videographer will say "good" and "awesome" at a couple of points where the horse and rider are really nailing the good gait - something the other video never quite got IMO.

    What sets the blue's gait apart (for me) is the timing of the pick up and he can carry good easy form and tempo with speed.

    The good form to my learning eye is this: notice how his lateral hind is almost on the ground before that fore picks up? ANd for a brief moment there is almost a "V" to that lateral pair? THAT is what I did not see a good clear example of in the other video.

    Here you go = a great example of the walking gait:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bYmPSzWjpEE
    from sunridge1:Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.it is going to be good until the last drop!Eleneswell, the open trail begged to be used. D Taylor



  2. #2
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    And just look at the conformation on that horse! Swoons! *grabby hands*

    My current TWH looks nothing like that unless he is hog fat masking the length of his back. He is long backed for the old breed standard and therefore would rather step-pace or hard pace. He can RW but it's difficult for him.



  3. #3
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    Better example, I think.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=usZCp-nJEYI

    The horse is moving easily and correctly. The blue roan had an intermittent "hitch" in his movement; I'm not sure why.

    G.
    Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão


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  4. #4
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    See G - I would call the "flat walk" on that horse a "plain walk." The movement bounces the horse's back and the rider. See how its butt is not engaged at all in the FW? To me this is not gaiting - it is medium walking - or cheater's gait as my trainer calls it.

    And when the video is labled "running walk - THAt is more of a gait. But it is so slow I would call it a flat walk - not a running walk. What makes it a real gait and not a cheaters gait is the rider is no longer bobbing up and down with the back bounce: the croup is lower showing it is actually engaged through the back. However it lacks impulsion and the moving out sensation that a running walk should have. And it is still stiff and tending to want to pace.

    JMO on that horse. But there are those that would agree with that trainer and you.

    I would rather own the blue horse and figure out the "little bob." BTW the head bob tells a story at the beginning with its unequal "down nod" or "up bob" of his head. It could be as simple as rider interference, or a high/low foot, a strong side weak side thing etc.

    I guess none are ever absolutely perfect - but this blue one comes close and serves as a good example. Besides he gives me goosebumps and he gives the rider much more gait.
    from sunridge1:Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.it is going to be good until the last drop!Eleneswell, the open trail begged to be used. D Taylor


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  5. #5
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    I loved watching the step-pace. I wasn't reading the tag lines. So at first I thought WTH is that! That is what the slow gait in the 5-gaited ASB should be with animation. We don't see much anymore.



  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by hurleycane View Post
    You had once mentioned some videos that gave a good explanation of the intermediate gaits. They were good - like you said.

    In them they spoke about the pick up of the pairs and the speakers disagreed a little on what was shown as to whether it was a good running walk verses getting a little lateral (step pace).

    Below is a video from some folks that sell/train nice walking type horses. At about 1:25 they will show the blue horse doing his walking gaits. The videographer will say "good" and "awesome" at a couple of points where the horse and rider are really nailing the good gait - something the other video never quite got IMO.

    What sets the blue's gait apart (for me) is the timing of the pick up and he can carry good easy form and tempo with speed.

    The good form to my learning eye is this: notice how his lateral hind is almost on the ground before that fore picks up? ANd for a brief moment there is almost a "V" to that lateral pair? THAT is what I did not see a good clear example of in the other video.

    Here you go = a great example of the walking gait:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bYmPSzWjpEE
    Many thanks for this! WHAT an awesome horse, and I noticed how still his rider is sitting as well. My little guy is just becoming strong enough to start doing this (late-blooming age 7) and it's interesting that I mostly get it when dropping down from the canter. Out loose in the field the other day, playing with the others, he dropped from a nicely self-collected canter through about five strides of this RW and then back to the canter--I nearly dropped my TEETH and said, Oh man, we've gotta get that UNDER SADDLE!!!

    Doing my due diligence with miles and miles of dog-walking and flat-walking with plenty of hills. This sounds nuts, but I'm also teaching him a stride or two of shoulder-in (my past cropping out!) on the road, and I'm loving the "pushing-off" engagement he gives me after it. Probably not orthodox, but . . .

    I'll be imprinting this video (and G's) on my brain for future reference. Thanks!


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  7. #7
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    Very cool! Thanks for posting the links.
    It's 2014. Do you know where your old horse is?



  8. #8
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    I'm with hurleycane. As someone w/ an ASB background I am pretty much of a stickler for purity of gait, and I feel the grey roan is more correct in that respect, esp. the second way of the ring. I did notice the unevenness of the head bob in the trail portion, which I'd about kill to see from the side so we could see what was going on, and when it got to the ring portion it was also obvious that the horse is quite one-sided (aren't they all). The grey roan IMO was much better tracking right (the second half of the video) than tracking left.

    What do y'all think of this one? (Gets better as it goes along, so watch a few mins at least.) This one, to me, looks more correct than either of the other two, and really only has a few strides here and there when the 4-beat gait is not regular. As the video captions state, I think a lot of it is down to very good riding.

    Hurleycane knows I quite admire these folks (same folks that trained the grey roan). LOT of good natural gaited horses on their YT channel. I spend a lot of time on their site working to improve my eye. Wish they were in Tennessee instead of Texas - they'd be getting a pony in for training!
    "The standard you walk by is the standard you accept."--Lt. Gen. David Morrison, Austalian Army Chief



  9. #9
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    Like! He's a little more tense and hollow at first than the other two, but very even and HOLY OVERTRACK, BATMAN!!!

    I wondered what was up with that uneven head nod in the first vid too--but that said, my old guy used to do just that and he wasn't lame; possibly a manifestation of one-sidedness as you say.

    I'm still laughing about what someone said on the other thread about needing an "educated butt!" I'm working on acquiring that right now . . .



  10. #10
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    this one? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dhC32v9KDWY

    Me like this one too Liz. - though he only goes second way - lol. wink. He has a sticky right stifle IMO. Twists his hock out as he strides over and stumbles onto the front of that foot a couple of times because of it. Getting his head a lot lower would help him deal with it. But most definitely the pali is well gaited and built nice and broad to carry the rider.


    ... I would still tie the Blue roan first on my card. (grin) I hope more enter the ring here.
    from sunridge1:Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.it is going to be good until the last drop!Eleneswell, the open trail begged to be used. D Taylor


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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lady Eboshi View Post
    I'm still laughing about what someone said on the other thread about needing an "educated butt!" I'm working on acquiring that right now . . .
    It's SO true though (and not just for gaited horses). One of the main reasons I felt I had to quit riding is that my L1 vertebra is completely collapsed on one side and I am no longer capable of sitting evenly - in a saddle, a chair or anything else. We all know what happens when your weight is off-balance in a saddle...
    "The standard you walk by is the standard you accept."--Lt. Gen. David Morrison, Austalian Army Chief



  12. #12
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    I know ZERO I mean less than Zero about gaited horses, but how in the heck do you tell if they are lame with all that head nodding?
    Not being funny really wondering?
    I know nothing, I like the second horse better. looks smoother. Perhaps a rocky mountain? Moves totally different than the blue horse.
    "you can only ride the drama llama so hard before it decides to spit in your face." ?Caffeinated.



  13. #13
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    Sannois, I actually found myself wondering the same thing. Saddlebreds of course trot as well as slow gait & rack, so not an issue with them. And the COTH TWH we rescued will trot on the lunge line though he gaits in the pasture, no problem there either... But I do have exactly the same question about gaited horses that do nothing but gait!
    "The standard you walk by is the standard you accept."--Lt. Gen. David Morrison, Austalian Army Chief


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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sannois View Post
    I know ZERO I mean less than Zero about gaited horses, but how in the heck do you tell if they are lame with all that head nodding?
    Not being funny really wondering?
    I know nothing, I like the second horse better. looks smoother. Perhaps a rocky mountain? Moves totally different than the blue horse.
    You look to see how even the head nod is (IF they nod - rack/step pace will not nod much). You check length of stride. You check their hips (are they dropping one?). You check their bend right and left.

    The canter (or lack of it) will tell a lot on gaiters.

    WHich brings up a point - aren't trotting horses evaluated for quality of walk?
    from sunridge1:Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.it is going to be good until the last drop!Eleneswell, the open trail begged to be used. D Taylor


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  15. #15
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    BTW I enjoyed watching the palomino's hip working/rotating.
    from sunridge1:Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.it is going to be good until the last drop!Eleneswell, the open trail begged to be used. D Taylor


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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by War Admiral View Post
    It's SO true though (and not just for gaited horses). One of the main reasons I felt I had to quit riding is that my L1 vertebra is completely collapsed on one side and I am no longer capable of sitting evenly - in a saddle, a chair or anything else. We all know what happens when your weight is off-balance in a saddle...
    War - I think the right horse and you would do fine. You will find a way to center your weight and balance on him. Like that Pali - he is built to ride.
    from sunridge1:Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.it is going to be good until the last drop!Eleneswell, the open trail begged to be used. D Taylor


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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by hurleycane View Post
    WHich brings up a point - aren't trotting horses evaluated for quality of walk?
    Yes of course, but on the lameness grading scale, the Grade 1 definition is "lameness not visible at the walk"...
    "The standard you walk by is the standard you accept."--Lt. Gen. David Morrison, Austalian Army Chief



  18. #18
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    What does everyone think about this? One thing that helps me the most are videos where you can hear, as well as see, the footfalls in the correct gait. It's an easy way to correct your perceptions when you think you're getting something really groovy that you're not. Given that we can't see, and are sometimes not accurately able to feel, what's happening down there where all those legs are churning when we're sitting up top!


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  19. #19
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    For a gaited horse if they are lame they will bob their head in a different way. It will still be the same. It is more exaggerated depending on what foot/leg etc is sore..

    If the red rescued horse trots on the line, jiggle the line and ask him to slow down. I tell my gaited rocky to "trrrrot" and she 4 beat gaits. Just a word, but she knows what it means. When she trots, I kiss her and make her canter. Or I stop her or I slow her so she breaks gait to a gait. In the RM breed, they do not care if it is a flat walk show walk etc, it is all "a 4 beat gait". They will 4 beat or step pace. Most those other terms are only used in the TWH breed. They gait or they do not. Pasos, same way, peruvians same way. On my horse I want a 4 beat gait. No canter, no trot. She trots in the pasture, gaits also, is in gait at all times at the casual walk in the pasture, but if she is in my 90' rp and if she trots, she can't hold it for long and has to 4 beat gait. She just doesn't have the muscling to trot. I have let her just trot, lovely, but she will have to give that up after a few minutes.



  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sannois View Post
    I know ZERO I mean less than Zero about gaited horses, but how in the heck do you tell if they are lame with all that head nodding?
    Not being funny really wondering?
    .
    I've yet to own one that wouldn't either trot or pace on a line. At that point just evaluate as usual.
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