The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 32 of 32
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2007
    Location
    Port Charlotte, FL
    Posts
    3,394

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Crockpot View Post
    . . .
    The head goes up as the weight is shifted to the diagonally opposite hind. The video explained it pretty well I thought .
    The video absolutely agrees with my assertion.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2012
    Posts
    1,562

    Default

    The video absolutely agrees with my assertion.
    No it does not. Did you watch it?

    You stated

    " In a trot, head down on LF would point to right hind"

    You also challenged me for saying the head nod could be indicative of front end lameness.

    The video asserts the head nod is most often indicative of front leg lameness. The weight is shifted off the sore front leg.

    Hilary Clayton seems to agree
    http://cvm.msu.edu/research/research...athletic-horse

    The head nod, used primarily to reduce loading of the lame forelimb, is a dynamic
    mechanism and timing of the oscillations relative to the limb movements is important.
    During stance, the trunk descends from contact to midstance. The neck, cantilevered in
    front of the body, also descends during the stance phase under control of the cervical
    musculature. In a sound horse, the head nods downwards slightly during each diagonal
    stance phase. In forelimb lameness, sinking of the head and neck is reduced or abolished
    during the lame diagonal stance phase, with a compensatory increase in the amount of
    lowering during the compensating diagonal stance phase. The head and neck are lifted
    during the later part of the compensating diagonal stance at the same time as these limbs
    are generating propulsion. The upward swing of the head and neck increases the force of
    the hoof against the ground, which helps to lift the trunk
    .



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2007
    Location
    Port Charlotte, FL
    Posts
    3,394

    Default

    Your failure to comprehend the difference in direction between UP and DOWN in relation to the context of the discussion is dully noted.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2012
    Posts
    1,562

    Default



    I understand the distinction you are trying to make but either way it results in a head nod. Again I refer to your source, Hilary Clayton :

    The head nod, used primarily to reduce loading of the lame forelimb
    In forelimb lameness, sinking of the head and neck is reduced or abolished
    during the lame diagonal stance phase, with a compensatory increase in the amount of
    lowering during the compensating diagonal stance phase. The head and neck are lifted
    during the later part of the compensating diagonal stance
    at the same time as these limbs
    are generating propulsion
    I think we are going around in circles with heads bobbing.

    Sorry OP for the derailment of your thread.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul. 10, 2008
    Location
    Wales, UK
    Posts
    511

    Default

    Please don't apologize I'm grateful that knowledgeable people are taking the time to post. Every word is being scrutinised.
    Thank you



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2007
    Location
    Port Charlotte, FL
    Posts
    3,394

    Default

    The grammatical constructs and phrasing of Clayton's words as used in the above referenced quote could be construed to indicate that both limbs in a diagonal pair generate propulsion.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2007
    Location
    Port Charlotte, FL
    Posts
    3,394

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alexie View Post
    Please don't apologize I'm grateful that knowledgeable people are taking the time to post. Every word is being scrutinised.
    Thank you
    You might want to consider the "knowledge" of the parties involved from an epistemological point of view.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jul. 10, 2008
    Location
    Wales, UK
    Posts
    511

    Default

    Update for anyone interested:
    He's forming a splint on the front right.



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2009
    Location
    South of the Tennessee border
    Posts
    210

    Default

    Talk about micro managing. Why does a question always become a HUGE issue. I just think it's sooooo funny, it happens all the time, look for the obvious folks before spouting.



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2006
    Posts
    9,915

    Default

    OP, here's a link that further explains the relationship between head bobbing and lameness: http://www.kumeuvets.co.nz/Articles/...0/Default.aspx Also: http://www.equinechronicle.com/healt...-lameness.html

    In my experience when I see head bobbing it's usually indicative of front head lameness, but that could be because the hind end lameness I've dealt with were not horrible unless the horse was flexed.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2012
    Posts
    1,562

    Default

    Update for anyone interested:
    He's forming a splint on the front right.
    Thanks for the update. Hope he is better soon.



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jul. 10, 2008
    Location
    Wales, UK
    Posts
    511

    Default

    Thank you greyarabpony and crockpot ,hopefully he will be right soon


    1 members found this post helpful.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 35
    Last Post: Mar. 31, 2012, 11:48 AM
  2. Lameness Vet in NC?
    By tuttifruitti in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: Aug. 24, 2011, 08:18 AM
  3. Replies: 13
    Last Post: Aug. 12, 2010, 06:18 PM
  4. Replies: 14
    Last Post: Dec. 23, 2009, 09:49 AM
  5. Replies: 23
    Last Post: Aug. 28, 2009, 07:43 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •