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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 30, 2009
    Posts
    66

    Default Stall Fronts

    Hi! We are currently in the process of designing our barn and trying to decide what stall fronts we want to use. It's going to be a 5 stall barn used for personal use only. We either want to do the basic euro or the euro low rise stall front. If anyone knows pros/cons of either of these- I would love y'all's opinion! Thanks so much!
    Here are the two options... (Scroll all the way down to see. And disregard the company/prices. We have a different builder)

    http://www.barnpros.com/barn-store.a...53&prodid=5821

    http://www.barnpros.com/barn-store.a...53&prodid=5824



  2. #2
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2009
    Location
    Texas Hill Country
    Posts
    597

    Default

    This probably wouldn't happen with a normal horse, but my melodramatic Arab mare flipped her wig and tried to jump out of a low-slung Euro-stall at a boarding barn. It was a perfect storm of new surroundings, thunder, hail, and separation from pasture buddy, and what a bad scene. Blood everywhere. I had always planned to go for that Euro profile when I built my own barn because it's so open and un-jail-like, but after that incident I went with full wire mesh from Lucas Equine, with yokes. They're indestructible, airy, and if my horses die in their stalls I know it won't be because of the stall fronts.
    Dreadful Acres: the chronicle of my extraordinary unsuitability to country life


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2002
    Location
    Alpharetta, GA
    Posts
    2,325

    Default

    My training farm with 25+ horses has full sliding doors with bars on the aisle side and full sliding doors over a full screen door out the back. I love that setup for a big barn. It's very bright, cheerful and safe- no biting or mischief.

    I also have a 5 stall barn at home for retiree/brood mare/ layup. I just renovated and upgraded it with sliding doors with yoke and mesh below. I love love it for a smaller, less commercial setting. The horses love sticking their heads out. I can see the entire stall with the mesh below so I can see the baby great.

    I don't like the euro stall style. I don't think you could hang blankets on your stalls and I just don't know why you'd want the horse to have that much access to the hall and the other horses. Seems like mischief waiting to happen.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    14,843

    Default

    I think you buy stall fronts to suit the occupants and your work habits.(Bear in mind that a swinging door is not too convenient.) The things I think are detrimental to the sanity of horses, are solid stall dividers
    ... _. ._ .._. .._


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2005
    Location
    Spotsylvania, VA
    Posts
    13,471

    Default

    I hate horses' heads in the aisle. They can hang their heads out the dutch doors but NOT in the aisle
    I wasn't always a Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 30, 2009
    Posts
    66

    Default

    Thanks for the replies! What do y'all think about the drop down stall door?

    http://www.barnpros.com/barn-store.a...59&prodid=5937



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    14,843

    Default

    It will iritate you because it can be dangerous. If you leave it down, you really have to put it up to prevent accidents when you want to open the door. You'd probably end up leaving the bars up, which is not why you spent all that money on it.
    ... _. ._ .._. .._



  8. #8
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2009
    Location
    Texas Hill Country
    Posts
    597

    Default

    The open yokes on my stall fronts have removable inserts that allow me to completely imprison the occupant if necessary. I went with removable rather than drop-down because I figured I'd rarely use them, and didn't want that extra metal hanging there all the time. They're stored away in the hay barn, providing expensive armatures for cobweb weavers, and I doubt they'll ever see the light of day, but it's good to know they're there, just in case.
    Dreadful Acres: the chronicle of my extraordinary unsuitability to country life



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    5,026

    Default

    I have drop down doors similar to what you posted. They work great. I leave them down most of the time, but do close them when necessary and like having that option. You'd have to be stupid to slide the door open with a horse's head out (I assume that is what Equibrit meant calling them dangerous). I've boarded at several barns with the same type doors and never seen anyone do it...if some of those people and horses managed to survive, I think anyone can.

    You want to be sure the bars are spaced so a horse can't grab between them (so can't get lower jaw caught). Most of the pre fabs are doing ok, but I've seen some homemade fronts that were scary with too lightweight bars or big spaces.

    I've been in a barn with the euro type fronts like first posted and those looked nice, but I hated the swinging doors (they didn't swing all the way open and flat against wall, poor design or install, so you'd go down the asle with all these doors in the way). Then the builder had put a header board across the top for some reason, which was crazy as it was so low, any of the normal warmblood size horses could crack their head on it. The lack of header is part of the appeal of the euro stall, I thought? They had also left gaps under some of the the swinging doors that were the perfect size for a hoof to go thru and be stuck. But those issues can be blamed on the installer, not design.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2008
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    2,198

    Default

    I love my stall fronts. I have a small feeder window that I use to feed grain. Otherwise I don't let the horses hang their heads out in the aisle. Not only do they pull out everything they can get their teeth on, but it allows them to bite passerby. I would worry about a person getting bitten.

    My set up
    http://thepitchforkchronicles.com/page2.php

    you may need to scroll down a bit to get to the stall pictures



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2006
    Location
    Collingwood,ON
    Posts
    1,395

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by carolprudm View Post
    I hate horses' heads in the aisle. They can hang their heads out the dutch doors but NOT in the aisle
    Totally agree. I don't allow heads hanging into my aisle. It is a hazard in my opinion. A lady I know had a serious TBI from getting kicked in the head when her horse wheeled around to kick out at a a horse hanging it's head out of the stall door .


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2006
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    557

    Default

    In one part of our farm I have Hi Qual "Original" stall fronts and they have that same drop down stall front. When they are down the grate is out of the way and they have a lot more space then a Yoke front. They are easy to flip up, so when I have a goofy youngster that needs to learn to cope with confinement I just flip them up.

    The Euro designs you show are beautiful, but in my humble opinion not very practical.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2009
    Location
    Texas Hill Country
    Posts
    597

    Default

    Oh man, I'm totally down with the horrors of trying to walk your horse through a double gauntlet of bitey heads, each trying to take out a chunk. That's why I designed my barn with stalls only on one side of the 14' aisle, so it's easy to stay a neck's length away. The yokes are high enough that they prevent full-on lunges if someone does happen to get too close.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Of course stalls-on-one-side would be impractical at a large, busy barn, but with only 3 at home, I figured they like sticking their heads out so much, why not?
    Dreadful Acres: the chronicle of my extraordinary unsuitability to country life


    3 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2003
    Location
    Windward Farm, Washougal, WA- our work in progress, our money pit, our home!
    Posts
    6,984

    Default

    I have doors that have a fold back "window" in the bars (similar to the fold down ones...which I love!) so that my boys can put their heads out, but not touch. If you have stalls on either side, then I suppose heads out would be an issue, though I've never had that problem at the barns I've been in. I prefer giving my horses the freedom of checking out the action in the barn. Go with what makes you comfortable--I love the option of door up/closed or down/over and open.
    Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun. 29, 2007
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    165

    Default

    After the oh so fun experience of my 3 year old attempting to jump over his 4' high dutch door I have come to prefer doors with either a yoke or a smaller window that opens. Something where they can easily put their head out but small enough that we aren't tempted to make a leap for it And if possible opt for something that gives you that ability to close it up fully if you need to. You never know when that ability might come in useful!



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr. 19, 2006
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    437

    Default

    I have regular sliding doors with solid bottoms and grilled tops. The top part of the door has "shutters" which open to each side and latch securely, creating a window in the door top. The opening is large enough to safely put a head out, but not big enough to tempt them to try and jump out. This setup allows me to have blanket bars on the doors. I leave them open all the time for my small pony (who can barely reach his nose out!) and for one horse I had that was not the type to play with anything within reach. My other 2 have theirs closed most of the time because they will play with anything they can get their teeth on.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 1999
    Location
    Shangri-LA
    Posts
    1,886

    Default

    The stall doors with the drop down grill can be a little dangerous if not properly closed, the potential to accidently open and hit someone in the head is possible. Go with either the yoke or with a swing out door. You could opt for a swing out section on the front of the stall rather than the door also. I would pass on swing out doors, I have them and they are a pita. I love the European stall fronts but as mentioned I would have a little concern about a horse thinking they might could jump out.



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