The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 13, 2013
    Posts
    27

    Default Distances to Oxers

    For a square oxer, do you usually find the distance to the front or back of the jump? What's safer?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 22, 2005
    Location
    Where it is perpetually winter
    Posts
    5,020

    Default

    I've had it taught to me both ways - that you look at the back rail or that you look at the front rail and the back rail is your horse's concern. I ride to the front rail.

    Edit: Now that I think about it more, I think I ride to the front rail. I've never actually thought about how I ride it, I just do it ...
    Last edited by supershorty628; Jun. 7, 2013 at 08:26 PM.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 1, 2004
    Location
    Golden State
    Posts
    466

    Default

    I ride all oxers to the front rail. The distance inside the line is measured from the back rail of the first jump to the Front rail of the next one. Other than keeping my horse round and balanced up, I don't consider the back rail at all. Well, unless I am in the jumper ring and it's a behemoth spread then I make sure I am round,balanced AND have enough power to create a large enough arc. In the hunter ring oxers aren't wide so the arc of jumping the fence properly will take you over the back rail. Don't look down and don't lean out.
    I can explain it TO you,but I can't understand it FOR you



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 21, 2005
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    258

    Default

    I look at the front rail too. I ride jumpers. I press out over the wide ones, but other than knowing that I need to ride over/past the jump, I don't really think about the back rail.

    ETA I just saw your other thread and I see you're looking for insight into how people ride oxers. Don't lean, don't look down. Do concentrate on riding over and past your jump, focus up ahead where you want to eventually be. If you have a good quality canter and are nice and straight, looking ahead and up, you will be fine.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2005
    Posts
    255

    Default

    Back rail. It gets you to a better distance.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2000
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    404

    Default

    I've been out of the game a long time, but doesn't it depend on the horse? I always rode my junior jumper to the back rail, but she also had a very quick and careful front end, but not excessive scope. The rule with her was always a fast pace and distance choices of deep or deeper.

    I would have ridden a scopey horse that needed space in front of the jump very differently.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2013
    Posts
    65

    Default

    I ride to the front rail, as that's where the distance is measured to, but I also like to ride my oxers slightly deep so that he is at his peak at the back rail. If I rode an oxer like a verticle, he'd take off too soon and he'd drop the back rail.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2012
    Location
    Covington, LA
    Posts
    267

    Default

    I was always taught to ride to the front rail. In fact in the warm up ring when I was riding for a rub my trainer always told me to ride for the back rail.



Similar Threads

  1. I suck at oxers...
    By Burgie in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: Oct. 8, 2011, 10:02 AM
  2. Oxers & such
    By Kdash1228 in forum Eventing
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Jun. 16, 2011, 07:26 PM
  3. Why Swedish Oxers not allowed?
    By kayteedee in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: Feb. 23, 2011, 04:56 PM
  4. Oxers--back rail lower?
    By SkipChange in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: Oct. 16, 2009, 12:44 PM
  5. Overcoming an irrational fear of oxers.
    By akhunterrider in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: Aug. 11, 2009, 10:40 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness