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  1. #1
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    Default USEA Dressage Judging and Officials Training Programs

    Anyone have experience with this? I'm interested in this and also the officials training program and have begun reviewing the info on line. I'm curious about others who have gone through or are beginning to go through the programs. Advice? Experiences?

    I'm also curious about the ICP.



  2. #2
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    I know a few people who have gone or are going through it. Takes a chunk of time, money, and travel, but you learn a lot and most seem to really enjoy it.

    Does anyone know about the basic requirement to participate: "To have ridden two horses that have completed four or more horse trials at the Preliminary level or higher," is this four or more prelims PER HORSE or four or more prelims on two or more horses?

    Here is the USEF doc on the eventing officials training program:
    http://www.usef.org/documents/licens...nformation.pdf
    Hindsight bad, foresight good.



  3. #3
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    Aug. 13, 2002
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    Southern Pines, NC
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    I would read it as per horse. You thinking about it? Maybe we should do it together.


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  4. #4
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    It is per horse, although they have given a lot of exceptions. I went through it on the slow plan (due to still active competition schedule and big day job) from 2007-2009. Took the course in June 2007, did my apprenticing etc, took my final exam in October 2008 and was licensed (as a TD only, not judge) in April 2009. I had done a ton of volunteering, scoring and help organizing events before starting the program, and was already the rules "go to" person for my barn. In addition to the formal requirements, I took the course design weekend course and spent several days apprenticing in control with FlightCheck, msghook, Dick Thompson, Brian O'Connor and JJ Johnson. Both of those extras have been very helpful. I also apprenticed both inside and outside of my area (apprenticeships at Richland, Galway, Maui Jim, Fair Hill, Olney, Plantation, and Rocking Horse) and with both 'R' and 'r' TDs and judges. Whether or not you go on to get a license, it is a great program and you learn a lot. I still do more volunteering than officiating and most of my officiating is far from home as this area is quite saturated with TDs. One of my favorite experiences was getting to be the TD for the T3DE.
    OTTBs rule, but spots are good too!


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  5. #5
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    May. 9, 2007
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    Carthage, NC
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by scubed View Post
    Whether or not you go on to get a license, it is a great program and you learn a lot.
    Precisely! I believe that all riders and trainers should be required to attend the CD workshop and the dressage session 1 training program. The information taught and perspectives conveyed are indescribable, the lessons learned are practically innumerable, and the experience is, quite frankly, remarkable.

    I did the CD workshop in 2010 for a mini-vacation, and ended up falling in love with the work. Since then, I've completed many apprenticeships and independent studies with top FEI designers. I have recently taken on the BN-T courses at Chatt Hills, and I am waiting to receive confirmation from another venue. It now appears that I'm going to test for my 'r' license very soon.

    I am also in the Event Official/Dressage Judge queue, and I'm loving every. single. second. I've met and apprenticed with incredible national and int'l officials, each of whom is a great ambassador for the sport.

    In short, the courses are phenomenal experiences, and are truly worth every penny. If one would like to pursue USEF licensure, it takes dedication, hard work, introspection, and much commitment. Afterall, this is a lifestyle, not a summer job. The majority of officials do this because we love the horses, the horsemanship, the sport.
    Last edited by Glenbaer; Jun. 7, 2013 at 11:46 AM.


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  6. #6
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    Wow, this sounds great! I've got the horses at prelim or above requirement so I really could get started. But I'm not sure when I'd have the time. I may throw myself into it after Mick retires although according to our last vet exam/scintography, he will likely have many more years. Me, otoh, maybe not.

    So I need to get the documents etc from usea and start figurine out when and where to begin....



  7. #7
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    Information here: http://usef.org/_IFrames/LicensedOff...atlicInfo.aspx
    Training program manual here: http://useventing.com/sites/default/...nformation.pdf
    Schedule here: http://useventing.com/education/officials

    You have to log in on the USEF site to get the application
    OTTBs rule, but spots are good too!


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  8. #8
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    Apr. 30, 2002
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    This is one of my life goals but not until I am able to afford the travel and time required. Maybe when I retire!
    "Passion, though a bad regulator, is a powerful spring." -- Emerson
    www.eventhorse.wordpress.com


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  9. #9
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    I still wonder why the USEA doesn't offer specific stadium & XC training to USDF L Graduates so they can achieve a similar Eventing rating. That there does not appear to be any credit for their existing qualification, especially when the USDF L faculty is now doing the dressage training, just seems wrong.
    Brock
    Brock n. (Anglo-Saxon) badger as in Brockenhurst, Brocklebank etc www.area35.us


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