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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 21, 2010
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    2,568

    Default Do you pull the forelock? How?

    My boy is really bad about pulling. So I alternate pulling and using a thinning razor. It's a choose-your-battles thing, and this isn't high on my battle list, since we only do occasional showing at a local level (ie- no braiding).

    So I just finished his mane, and now he has a big ol fro in the front. I can probably get a few pulls in before he gets nutty, but how do you "shape" it so it doesn't look like a bowl haircut? Pull the sides more after getting the length right?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2008
    Posts
    7,564

    Default

    I don't...I get a little enthusiastic about shaving the bridle path/stray hairs on the side to cut down on bulk. Cheating, yes, but it looks good and natural.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2012
    Posts
    1,994

    Default

    I personally love a big, full forelock, but I'm probably biased since this is what I'm working with http://s63.photobucket.com/user/wang...77519.jpg.html

    But I've never had to braid for a rated show, either.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2008
    Posts
    1,528

    Default

    Never! I have forelock envy, PaintedHunter!!!! Wish my little mare's forelock was that glorious!!! I love thick, heavy forelocks so I would never pull or cut it!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2012
    Posts
    1,994

    Default

    Well, along with the thick, full forelock comes a thick, full neck and beefy body.... Percheron crosses. Gotta love 'em.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2011
    Location
    Southern WI
    Posts
    311

    Default

    If you don't want to pull (and probably don't need to) you might be able to band the forelock down to make it neater. Use three or four bands like this and try to match the color of the horse's mane as closely as you can. It will then tuck under the brow band of the bridle and be much more discrete. I personally pull the forelock if I pull the mane just to make everything even, but you do it in the same way as you would the mane (take hair from the long ends, back comb and pull/razor off). You do need to regularly step back and assess your work to keep it from going out of control.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    Posts
    5,684

    Default

    "banding" is a no no for hunters.

    OP - is the forelock too much to braid? I would do like others, bring the bridle path a little forward if you have too much hair for a hunter braid.

    I was never a "braider" - but I spent years as a working student, and attended to the manes of 25 horses. I can't say I ever had to pull a forelock. We had one in the barn with a CRAZY thick mane and forelock. I pulled the mane, and brought the bridle path a up a bit for some thinning. Then would trim the length with a "razoring" method.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2006
    Posts
    9,040

    Default

    MY GOD NO.

    I do not even make a bridle path for my horses and after one or two encounters with "good Samaritans" I put a note on each board contract that no clipping/trimming/pulling/thinning is to be done on ANY part of my horses EVER by ANYONE who is not me.

    My horse's forelock looks like this (photo taken two days ago), and he will be going down centerline in 48 hours with his mane braided and his forelock out in all of its glory.

    For the hunters I just braid it and fold it under.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2001
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    6,979

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by meupatdoes View Post
    I do not even make a bridle path for my horses and after one or two encounters with "good Samaritans" I put a note on each board contract that no clipping/trimming/pulling/thinning is to be done on ANY part of my horses EVER by ANYONE who is not me.
    How do you manage with no bridle path? I think that would drive me batty.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2006
    Location
    Rochester NY
    Posts
    326

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tha Ridge View Post
    How do you manage with no bridle path? I think that would drive me batty.
    I would think it would be uncomfortable for the horse - with the bridle pulling their little hairs.....



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep. 14, 2000
    Location
    Goochland, VA
    Posts
    8,572

    Default

    I do it all the time. Hate wild, long forelocks and they make it hard to not have a sausage braid. I pull to length, then pull sides to taper. They look great.
    Laurie
    Finding, preparing, showing and training young hunters, in hand and performance.
    www.juniorjohnsontrainingandsales.com



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep. 27, 2000
    Location
    Southern California - on a freeway someplace
    Posts
    9,897

    Default

    No. But most of my horses have been challenged in the forelock department. Cool's was so sparse that I didn't braid it for dressage shows since I was concerned that I'd lose a hair or two and thus about 10% of the forelock.

    But now I have Skipper who makes up for several horses' lack of forelock hair.

    I braided a Connemara pony for a friend one time who had at least twice as much forelock as Skipper. I was at a bit of a loss. I tried folding it--too big. Tried rolling it--too big. I was tempted to pull it through and attach it to teh first mane braid. That was one time I was tempted to pull but wouldn't have dreamed of it, especially since she wasn't my horse.
    The Evil Chem Prof



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 10, 2005
    Location
    Va
    Posts
    3,753

    Default

    My mare is not keen on having her forelock pulled, so I never use a pulling comb. I just grab the longest hairs and pull them out a few at a time, so it is no big deal.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 4, 2011
    Posts
    342

    Default

    I'm with the not pulling a forelock group. This is my horse's forelock...
    https://fbcdn-sphotos-b-a.akamaihd.n...68776966_n.jpg
    As you can see it is huge but it braids up pretty nice actually
    Who say's your best friend has to be human?



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2003
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    10,960

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lauriep View Post
    I do it all the time. Hate wild, long forelocks and they make it hard to not have a sausage braid. I pull to length, then pull sides to taper. They look great.
    Hah! I got chewed out by a pro braider for shortening a forelock. I actually call it his fro-lock because there is so much of it. I figured there was no way in hell that it was going to make a nice braid. Turns out I was mostly wrong (he's the one on the right.). It was a bit sausage-y but not overly noticeable. His mother has the ultimate fro-lock.

    I always look at it and think it needs some cleaning up...but that braiders rebuke echoes in my mind...and the fact that he is not mine stops me from taking action against the -fro
    Keith: "Now...let's do something normal fathers and daughters do."
    Veronica: "Buy me a pony?"



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr. 6, 2006
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,929

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RugBug View Post
    Hah! I got chewed out by a pro braider for shortening a forelock. I actually call it his fro-lock because there is so much of it. I figured there was no way in hell that it was going to make a nice braid. Turns out I was mostly wrong (he's the one on the right.). It was a bit sausage-y but not overly noticeable. His mother has the ultimate fro-lock.

    I always look at it and think it needs some cleaning up...but that braiders rebuke echoes in my mind...and the fact that he is not mine stops me from taking action against the -fro
    OMG RugBug - I LOVE your horse! He reminds me of my beloved pinto mare who I lost.

    As for the forelock I would never shorten one, but I have used thinning shears to cut down on some of the volume in the past.

    My current horse has about 10 hairs that make up her forelock so I never touch them.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan. 24, 2000
    Location
    Bath, PA, USA
    Posts
    469

    Default

    Problem with bridle paths that they tend to creep unless you are very good and very careful. It's quite easy to deal without a bridle path - quick part in the mane and jut arrange the hair after bridle is on. Doesn't even take 30 seconds...
    "Horsemanship is not merely a matter of bodily skills, but is based on scholarship and, therefore, is a matter of the mind and intellect." Charles de Kunffy

    http://www.equiimages.com



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2003
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    10,960

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PaintPony View Post
    OMG RugBug - I LOVE your horse! He reminds me of my beloved pinto mare who I lost.
    Thanks! He belongs to a friend, but I get a regular ride on him and get to show him. He's quite an adorable boy.

    As for the forelock I would never shorten one, but I have used thinning shears to cut down on some of the volume in the past.

    My current horse has about 10 hairs that make up her forelock so I never touch them.
    The pinto is the rare occasion that I consider shortening/thinning. My own personal horses have: enough hair, but it's very baby fine hair. His forelock actually reminds me of the forelock that was on a stuffed horse I had as a kid. It feels almost exactly the same. This horse also has the most perfect mane ever. I only blade it, it all stays to the correct side ALL.The.Time. I'm in mane heaven with it.

    I also have
    not much forelock at all. there are no plans of doing anything to either...and I'm very careful of bridle path creep when I'm trimming.
    Last edited by RugBug; Jun. 7, 2013 at 02:44 PM.
    Keith: "Now...let's do something normal fathers and daughters do."
    Veronica: "Buy me a pony?"



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    12,976

    Default

    Noper.... no pulling forelocks in my world. And other than my pony that has so much mane that I can not keep a bridle on with out a bridle path (the bridle path is only as wide as the bridle) I have never made a bridle path.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec. 28, 2012
    Posts
    634

    Default

    At the risk of getting jumped all over ... I do trim my horses forelock. He's a Percheron cross and I do it because it is REALLY, REALLY thick and he ends up looking like a hairy troll doll. I do not pull it though. Instead I use some thinning scissors and kind of layer it to get it lay down. This way the forelock remains nice and thick and can always grow out if I totally screw it up.

    Here's a picture of my troll doll from last year from facebook and one from this spring ... https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?f...type=3&theater
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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