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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by poltroon View Post
    Interesting. My vet did prescribe it last year when I had a horse that scratched his eye. He said it turns out that the difference is the insert and the price tag.
    My vet has told me the same thing, and during the temporary price spike last year in the opthalmic ointment, told me what to get OTC at the drugstore and how to use it. Remember that the tiny little tubes are full of almost the identical same thing, and are also not sterile once opened.

    No need to get all excited. A lot of veterinary medicine actually isn't rocket science or voodoo.

    It IS extremely important to get the one with JUST triple-antibiotic, and NO pain-reliever or hydrocortisone. ASK YOUR VET FIRST!!



  2. #22
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    Dec. 18, 2006
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    NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bacardi1 View Post
    ONCE AGAIN - Unless you've had the foresight &/or intelligence to have your vet look at your horse's eye problem, you're frankly an asshole to treat it yourself.
    I think people got your point after the first two posts.

    Maybe it is just a hypothetical question; no need to call anyone an asshole just for asking.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockfordbuckeye View Post
    The main issue (though there are many) is that neosporin isn't made to be sterile enough for use in an eye - so you would risk making the infection worse by irritating the cornea and possibly introducing even more contamination into it.

    When it comes to the eyes, all medications must be exclusively made to administer into the eye. Eyes are very fragile.
    I agree, eyes are fragile. I would not do it without having the vet see it and without the vet's blessing. I don't mess around with eyes.

    But are you suggesting that a tube of triple antibiotic meant for putting in open wounds... is not sterile? Sterile is a yes/no question.

    Lady Eboshi, I'm glad to hear the price spike was temporary. Yes, at the time of that vet call, the tiny Rx opthalmic ointment was running over $100 a tube!!
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket



  4. #24
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    Jul. 10, 2003
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    They are both the same antibiotics in a petroleum-based carrier, right? Both are sterile. I don't know if the amount of antibiotic or the carriers are different, but it isn't a crazy question.

    Does anyone know why eye ointment has gotten so expensive? A tube used to be about $4. Now they're $25 or more.
    As Peter, Paul, and Mary say, a dragon lives forever.


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  5. #25
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    Mar. 26, 2005
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    Back to Normal.. or as close as I'll ever get
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    IIWM I wouldn't chance it unless your vet okays.

    But then, I am the owner of a WB who came to me with a 60% occlusion in his right eye - the result of a poorly treated infection.
    Resulting scar is cosmetic and he does have vision in the eye, but why buy trouble?
    And, if it turned out the application of Neosporin was painful (as related by Cindyg), why subject your horse to this?
    *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
    Steppin' Out 1988-2004
    Hey Vern! 1982-2009
    Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009



  6. #26
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    Sep. 6, 2012
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    Moved South from North Pole
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    Default terramycin

    While you should call your vet out for every eye problem, so that he can prescript the proper steroidal eye meds, you can have temporary help on hand by buying pfizer's terramycin. Aha you ask, when the pfizer plant was closed down several years ago here in the USA for contamination, how do you find terramycin now? Especially when it was selling for 10-12 dollars and up before the plant closing? And the price is high now, we guess, although we don't look stateside any more.

    Go to Ebay. Go the the terramycin sales. Look at those for sale by ihypc. Yes he is out of the country. Yes it will take 10 days or more to get your terramycin. But it's now 100 tubes, made by pfizer overseas, same company as stateside, for $165 including shipping. Our owner, we're warmbloods, has been buying from ipypc for over 4 years. And she tested it on herself before using it on us. The guy is honest, a great price, how can you beat 1.65 a tube of pfizer terramycin? And reliable.

    You use the terramycin every 4 hours until you get the vet out. helps to prevent the corneal ulcers from scratches, helps with conjunctivitis, and helps with dirt of sand in the eye. Also works on humans and dogs and cats. Still get the vet out. But until he comes, use the terramycin. As we said, our owner tested it on her own eyes, and uses it when she gets any eye irritation herself. It's human grade.



  7. #27
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    Aug. 22, 2009
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    Medications indicated for eye use have a higher level of sterility during manufacturing and also have to have certain other requirements such as a particular pH, osmolarity, etc. that make them less likely to irritate the fragile lining of the eye.

    http://www.globalrph.com/ophthalmicfortified.htm



  8. #28
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    Mar. 9, 2003
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    Baldwin, MD
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    Quote Originally Posted by WildandWickedWarmbloods View Post
    While you should call your vet out for every eye problem, so that he can prescript the proper steroidal eye meds, you can have temporary help on hand by buying pfizer's terramycin. Aha you ask, when the pfizer plant was closed down several years ago here in the USA for contamination, how do you find terramycin now? Especially when it was selling for 10-12 dollars and up before the plant closing? And the price is high now, we guess, although we don't look stateside any more.

    Go to Ebay. Go the the terramycin sales. Look at those for sale by ihypc. Yes he is out of the country. Yes it will take 10 days or more to get your terramycin. But it's now 100 tubes, made by pfizer overseas, same company as stateside, for $165 including shipping. Our owner, we're warmbloods, has been buying from ipypc for over 4 years. And she tested it on herself before using it on us. The guy is honest, a great price, how can you beat 1.65 a tube of pfizer terramycin? And reliable.

    You use the terramycin every 4 hours until you get the vet out. helps to prevent the corneal ulcers from scratches, helps with conjunctivitis, and helps with dirt of sand in the eye. Also works on humans and dogs and cats. Still get the vet out. But until he comes, use the terramycin. As we said, our owner tested it on her own eyes, and uses it when she gets any eye irritation herself. It's human grade.


    Jeezy cripes. Please don't order eye meds from overseas. Terramycin is a common, inexpensive and easily available medication available right here in the good ol' USA from your friendly, accredited veterinarian.



  9. #29
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    Feb. 6, 2000
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    MA
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockfordbuckeye View Post
    The main issue (though there are many) is that neosporin isn't made to be sterile enough for use in an eye - so you would risk making the infection worse by irritating the cornea and possibly introducing even more contamination into it.

    When it comes to the eyes, all medications must be exclusively made to administer into the eye. Eyes are very fragile.
    IMHO the main issue is that the carrier in the general topical version is not formulated to be safe for ophthalmic use.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  10. #30
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    Feb. 6, 2000
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    MA
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    Quote Originally Posted by CrowneDragon View Post
    They are both the same antibiotics in a petroleum-based carrier, right? Both are sterile. I don't know if the amount of antibiotic or the carriers are different, but it isn't a crazy question.

    Does anyone know why eye ointment has gotten so expensive? A tube used to be about $4. Now they're $25 or more.
    Because there's only one manufacturer currently producing the ophthalmic version, so they can price gouge.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  11. #31
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    Mar. 10, 2006
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    I worked as a Tech in an eye clinic at a hospital. Though not a doctor I did have a lot of knowledge. What I found was the vets and GPs knew very little about eyes. My vet used to ask me for advice.

    I would never put anything in and eye that wasn't specifically formulated for ophthalmic use.



  12. #32
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    Pfizer makes the terramycin that we use. Made in another country by the same company whose plant shut down for a while here. And much cheaper. Same product, but cheaper.



  13. #33
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    Oct. 25, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by poltroon View Post
    I agree, eyes are fragile. I would not do it without having the vet see it and without the vet's blessing. I don't mess around with eyes.

    But are you suggesting that a tube of triple antibiotic meant for putting in open wounds... is not sterile? Sterile is a yes/no question.

    Lady Eboshi, I'm glad to hear the price spike was temporary. Yes, at the time of that vet call, the tiny Rx opthalmic ointment was running over $100 a tube!!
    Yes, that was some kind of supply-line craziness with Bausch & Lomb. The vet told me she was embarassed to charge that for it when the same thing exactly could be had at CVS for three bucks! We had a horse at the time with a real corker of a corneal tear going, so this was a great solution for us. Squeeze a little out onto the tip of your left index finger, offer the horse a treat with your right hand, lift your hand so he has to "invert" his head and roll his eye toward the sky and . . . squelch! He gets the treat just as your goo-ball goes between his lids. It's a super trick and eventually you won't even need a halter! His "owwie" turned out just fine. Note: This WAS done under veterinary direction.

    Also: Nothing, not ophthalmic ointment, not your contact lenses, not even a band-aid or gauze is sterile once it touches the eye, the finger, the countertop or the skin. And no one really expects it to be. Most of the time you're doing the Triple as a precaution while the cornea heals; not in the presence of a real, active infection. This is a major point!


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  14. #34
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    Aug. 22, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ghazzu View Post
    IMHO the main issue is that the carrier in the general topical version is not formulated to be safe for ophthalmic use.
    Yeah. That's a huge issue too. I guess I was more concerned about infection since the eye already is infected. Hard to weight which particular thing freaked me out the most!



  15. #35
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    Aug. 22, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lady Eboshi View Post
    Yes, that was some kind of supply-line craziness with Bausch & Lomb. The vet told me she was embarassed to charge that for it when the same thing exactly could be had at CVS for three bucks! We had a horse at the time with a real corker of a corneal tear going, so this was a great solution for us. Squeeze a little out onto the tip of your left index finger, offer the horse a treat with your right hand, lift your hand so he has to "invert" his head and roll his eye toward the sky and . . . squelch! He gets the treat just as your goo-ball goes between his lids. It's a super trick and eventually you won't even need a halter! His "owwie" turned out just fine. Note: This WAS done under veterinary direction.

    Also: Nothing, not ophthalmic ointment, not your contact lenses, not even a band-aid or gauze is sterile once it touches the eye, the finger, the countertop or the skin. And no one really expects it to be. Most of the time you're doing the Triple as a precaution while the cornea heals; not in the presence of a real, active infection. This is a major point!
    Apologies but OTC Neosporin and Rx ophthalmic eye ointments are NOT the same thing. Please - you are stretching a "similarity" into a "same thing." There are some very important distinctions that your vet (and a good optometrist/opthamologist) should be educating you about. Just because one Vet says it's true doesn't make it true. It makes that one vet ignorant.


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