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  1. #21
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    Oct. 27, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThisTooShallPass View Post
    What Bluey said.

    I have never even owned a western saddle & I KNOW this.

    I find it very odd the OP finds the training odd.

    If her owners are that unsteady, why on earth train it out? Odds are if they fall off the horse will probably wait around for them, & not take off back to the barn. Horse may back away a bit, trying to take slack out of "the rope," but will figure out stupid owner only fell off (again); if they are as pathetic of riders as you are making them out to be.
    Sheesh... Very harsh response to a perfectly legitimate question. I've ridden english (dressage and eventing) my entire life. I have never heard of such a cue either. Also, if the owners are older and new-ish to horses that seems like a very good reason to work on retraining the horse... If she is quiet, sweet, and otherwise suitable it seems like a VERY minor thing to alter to ensure that they will be safe and she won't unintentionally unseat them.


    8 members found this post helpful.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2010
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    2,478

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    I too have never heard of this cue but I can understand why it could be useful in the right situation. For a lower level rider a good stop is paramount but the current cue could unseat a rider using the neck/mane for balance or when two-pointing. OP I think you are spot on with giving a cluck and adding leg. It sounds like she is a smart girl and is figuring out the "new rules" very quickly. I hope she turns into a great little mare for these riders. I too did not interpret your description of these riders as harsh or derogatory. Everyone starts somewhere and there is no shame in being a beginner or recognizing a rider as a beginner.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Dec. 12, 2010
    Location
    Kansas
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    1,197

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    Goodness, ThisTooShallPass, please... for the sake of us all go have a beer or something.

    OP I don't think you were bashing the rider's capabilities. I too did not know what this cue could be. I've never heard of it before either. Sounds like you are getting some good advice though.
    http://www.youtube.com/user/NBChoice http://nbchoice.blogspot.com/
    The New Banner's Choice- 1994 ASB Mare
    Dennis The Menace Too- 1999 ASB Gelding
    Dreamacres Sublime- 2008 ASB Gelding


    7 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
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    10,637

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    Her new owners are older and not very steady in the saddle, so this weird habbit is being taught out of her. I don't want anyone falling off by mistake.
    Nowhere in that do I see someone "bashing" the owners' riding ability, just being honest about it. The words "stupid" and "pathetic" didn't come from the OP...God forbid there be inexperienced riders in the world who aren't six years old.

    And I would think Bluey's right, that sounds like a roping cue that will probably fade with lack of use. But then I guess that based on living in places where English doesn't dominate and having friends and acquaintances with primarily Western disciplines. I wouldn't assume someone who's spent their entire life in English barns would automatically know why you'd want a horse to do that.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
    Location
    Northeast
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    10,955

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    However, I hope someone makes the new owner well aware of the past training. A sudden unexpected stop could be devastation to the stability of a green rider. I will say that there were many times in life that i wished I had a "stop broke" horse.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Apr. 3, 2006
    Location
    Spooner, WI
    Posts
    2,389

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    Quote Originally Posted by ThisTooShallPass View Post
    OMG are you serious? Why are you attacking me? The OP is the one that came here bashing the lack of the owners riding abilities. So go bash the OP for her diss'ing the owners to the whole world on a public board. Then you turn around and exactly agree with me to keep the cue? *go figure*
    You have lost your mind if you think,
    Her new owners are older and not very steady in the saddle, so this weird habbit is being taught out of her. I don't want anyone falling off by mistake.
    is bashing.

    For reference this is bashing,
    Her idiot owners are geezers and couldn't sit a couch much less a living breathing animal. So to cover my a$$ I need to train away from this cue so gram and gramps can't sue me for negligence.
    See the difference?


    13 members found this post helpful.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2002
    Location
    Russell, Ontario Canada
    Posts
    800

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    Well written sunridge! I've ridden western most of my riding life, and if I hadn't boarded at a farm with ropers, I'd never have known about that being a cue to stop! I'd never expect somebody who rides hunters/jumpers/dressage to know!

    As for bashing the owners, never saw a negative word written about them either, TTSP needs to take something to help "them" pass something. Honestly.
    ~~Some days are a total waste of makeup.~~


    3 members found this post helpful.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2011
    Posts
    272

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    I taught my horse to whoa if I touch his neck just in front of the withers when I started doing bridle-less work with him. You can still grab mane over jumps or use a grab strap with beginner riders, but the cue is a great back up brake in a bad situation.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2000
    Location
    Greenville, MI,
    Posts
    12,264

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    Quote Originally Posted by sunridge1 View Post
    You have lost your mind if you think, is bashing.

    For reference this is bashing,

    See the difference?
    Exactly, I was like Bashing?? I think she is being a concerned person for these older beginner riders.
    "you can only ride the drama llama so hard before it decides to spit in your face." ?Caffeinated.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Sep. 18, 2007
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    726

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    Put a grab strap on the Dee rings of the saddle so they don't need to grab mane.

    Get Rein-Aids in case they grab the reins and accidently hit the horse too hard in the mouth.

    I would do this with ALL beginners to save the poor horses' mouths. When the beginner riders get better balance the horse will still have some sensitivity.

    Grab strap discussion:
    http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/ar.../t-170801.html

    Rein-Aid : http://www.rein-aid.com/
    "Rein-Aid® helps the horse ‘forgive’ mistakes made by the less than perfect rider. Not only is this better for the horse, but it keeps him willing and easier to ride. Because the horse is rounder and softer with an elastic contact, the rider can focus on ‘feel’, position, timing, etc. As the skill level grows, so does the horse’s trust in the rider and the wonderful feeling of harmony can be achieved.:"

    Actually I think these are great tools for almost anyone.

    Horses are pretty forgiving and they can learn new things...this western horse is apparently learning English . I'd hate to train this out of an 18 yo...but a good home is more important in the long run and safety is important. I hope you'll try these 2 pieces of equipment which will help both your new riders AND their horse.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2000
    Location
    Greenville, MI,
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    12,264

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    Yes Excellent suggestions Uphill.
    "you can only ride the drama llama so hard before it decides to spit in your face." ?Caffeinated.



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2000
    Posts
    2,498

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    If a spotted saddle horse, then this training very well could be correct. Walkers and rackers (and road horses too, for that matter) are taught to go on contact, and stop when the contact is dropped. Icelandics too - my uncle had a friend end up in the hospital because he didn't listen to instructions, and the harder he pulled (trying to stop the horse), the faster the horse went! If he'd have just pushed his hands forward, the horse would have stopped.



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Jan. 24, 2006
    Location
    saginaw michigan
    Posts
    52

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    Hey, I've not done any shows other than, The Twilight Shows-its an all breed . Mia Cainey, did very good! When 1 of the girl's that I boarded with came out with me on 'The Flats' said, 'if my TB mare had his stop, I'd be riding her.' We also had, those that had a 'spur stop.' Why, I don't know?



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Mar. 18, 2005
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    1,076

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    It sounds to me like this is a roping horse cue. Test it out. First try mounting from the right side. If she allows that then dismount right side mount again put her in motion do the cue and emergency dismount right side walk or run forward a few steps turn come back to her and see if she backs up on her own.
    I got an older QH gelding out of an auction it didn't take me long to figure out that he was an ol roping horse. I could initialy get on him from the left side not a problem but if I dismounted from any side and got ready to remount right away he would back up and only let me get back on him from the right side. It took me quite awhile but I curred him of that by riding him up to my outer barn wall and turning him away from the wall I would dismount left side and turn to get back on him as he tried to back up he would bump the barn wall he soon learned to stand for mount and dismount from the left.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2004
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    Left coast, left wing, left field
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    6,530

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    Quote Originally Posted by ThisTooShallPass View Post
    What Bluey said.

    I have never even owned a western saddle & I KNOW this.

    I find it very odd the OP finds the training odd.

    If her owners are that unsteady, why on earth train it out? Odds are if they fall off the horse will probably wait around for them, & not take off back to the barn. Horse may back away a bit, trying to take slack out of "the rope," but will figure out stupid owner only fell off (again); if they are as pathetic of riders as you are making them out to be.
    This is bashing.
    Arrange whatever pieces come your way. - Virginia Woolf

    Did you know that if you say the word "GULLIBLE" really softly, it sounds like "ORANGES"?


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2007
    Location
    Round on the Ends and High in the Middle
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    467

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    Thanks guys for all the ideas.

    The older gentleman does have a grab strap on his saddle. Problem is, well, he forgets it is there. Ah, the aging process. He is the one I'm worried about since he is tall and his upper body strength is not great. He is also the risk taker of the two and will try what ever the horse offer.

    I did try to two point on her. She got a little worried, but quickly figured it out. Not sure if it was my body up on her neck (I was playing around) or mixed signals. She is a sharp little horse and I am enjoying our little riding sessions.



  17. #37
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    12,976

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    Quote Originally Posted by ThisTooShallPass View Post
    Go bash the OP, she is the one that came here putting down the owners capabilities. I merely pointed out how such a cue could be to great advantage to keep, especially for those that do not ride as well as she made sure to let us all know.
    I do not read anything the OP has posted as bashing the owners.



  18. #38
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2012
    Posts
    5,051

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    Quote Originally Posted by gdolapp View Post
    It sounds to me like this is a roping horse cue. Test it out. First try mounting from the right side. If she allows that then dismount right side mount again put her in motion do the cue and emergency dismount right side walk or run forward a few steps turn come back to her and see if she backs up on her own.
    I got an older QH gelding out of an auction it didn't take me long to figure out that he was an ol roping horse. I could initialy get on him from the left side not a problem but if I dismounted from any side and got ready to remount right away he would back up and only let me get back on him from the right side. It took me quite awhile but I curred him of that by riding him up to my outer barn wall and turning him away from the wall I would dismount left side and turn to get back on him as he tried to back up he would bump the barn wall he soon learned to stand for mount and dismount from the left.
    Isn't it amazing how they know their job? We were rehabbing a couple of old polo ponies one time that had been donated to a college, and were getting them in shape by doing stick 'n ball scrimmage one-on-one in a pasture field. Well, for 20 minutes that is. They KNEW the length of a chukker and at the precise moment when the whistle would have blown, they'd slam on the brakes and refuse to move. So we got off, led them to the fence, sat on the fence and talked for a few minutes, then got back on and played--for another "chukker!"

    I've also had one old-time reining horse and one old TWH who entertained my pidgin-English attempts to ride them with eyebrow-raised tolerance while making it no secret they considered me an untutored Bozo. Hence the large video library . . .


    2 members found this post helpful.

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2004
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Posts
    5,530

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    Quote Originally Posted by TrakGeorge View Post
    That is so true Bluey. Thanks for the helpful hints. Rode her again today and she was a good little girl. She wanted to stop when I moved my hands, but a little cluck was all that was needed and forward she continued. I don't think it will take long at all for her to ignore the cue.

    Poor little mare hasn't been ridden in at least 5 years or even more. I think she is happy to have a job and a happy home.
    Awe, what a good girl. I'd train it away too - no use for that kind of cue in a pleasure horse.



  20. #40
    Join Date
    Aug. 24, 2003
    Location
    Cresco, PA
    Posts
    155

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    OP, would they be open to using a western saddle? If they are older, a bit unsteady, and new riders, I'd think they would want a more secure seated saddle? Just a thought.


    1 members found this post helpful.

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