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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2004
    Location
    South Park
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    3,019

    Question How long does it take to build a house?

    Realistically?
    We've had a terrible time finding a decent house on horse property. Had contracts on 2 which had issues that came up during the inspections. Things that may have been very costly to fix. Both looked nice until you started to dig a little deeper - think roof leaks, water quality, rodent infestation, foundation issues, etc.
    We are now considering buying a lot and building our own instead of inheriting someone else's crap.
    It's just the 2 of us so nothing extravagant, though for resale purpose around 2,000 sq feet, 3 bedrooms 2 baths type.
    We have lots of acquaintances in all phases of the building world as many of the people that work at the ski area in the winter are skilled craftsmen and looking for work in the summer (and we also know who to stay away from )
    A friend told me I was delusional. I almost fell off my unicorn.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2001
    Location
    Finally home in CO
    Posts
    394

    Default

    It depends on the builder. Our house was finished in about 6 months. It's larger than average and has some energy saving things like solar and radiant floor heat. This builder works hard to finish a quality house quickly. Their usual house is built in about 3 months. I don't know if they are in your neck of the woods or not. They are in the Colorado Springs and Denver areas.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    May. 26, 2011
    Posts
    822

    Default

    It depends on the complexity of the house, size of the house and current status of the housing market. We built ours during the last housing boom. The builders were juggling so many jobs that it took 13 months.
    "I couldn't find my keys, so I put her in the trunk"



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2012
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    1,943

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    My neighbors just did theirs in 3 months! - That included the day they moved their trailer off the spot to the day they moved in. The builder had all his subcontractors lined up and ready to go (that can be a big issue). Its a lovely, basic, 2500sf house, one floor and finished basement - I think the house has three bedrooms, three bathrooms, a washroom, lovely kitchen opening into a dining room/living room. Very efficient.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 10, 2004
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    3,628

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    I work for a custom builder, a straight forward house that was 2000 sq ft essentially the shape of a box would take 4 or 5 months from ground break to move in. When we get more complicated, you are looking at 5-6, sometimes 7 if you start changing a bunch of stuff. It's also weather dependent as some outside stuff gets put on hold if the weather is horrible. That's breaking ground in the spring. If we break in the fall, some stuff might take longer because of snow in the winter, but not usually.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 19, 2006
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    437

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    We built 3 houses in the last 3 years. Each took about 6 months to be mostly complete (other than some exterior items like landscaping and rain gutters), though in the last 2 we moved in at the 3 month mark or so (as soon as we had a functioning bathroom) because the previous house we built had been sold. If you are willing to live in a construction zone you can do this without too many headaches, just wait until all flooring and painting are done and you have a bathroom. Kitchen is not crucial if you are ok with a hot plate, microwave and a fridge hooked up somewhere. If you have kids it is much more difficult.

    To make a short timeframe work you have to REALLY be on top of all scheduling of tradespeople and delivery of materials. For example, find out how long it might take to get delivery of the ceramic tiles you just love, and order them as soon as you know the square footage. You never know when stuff will go on back order, or the delivery takes twice as long because of summer vacations (and be glad you do not live in Quebec, where there is a 2 week MANDATORY vacation in July for all tradespeople)

    I forgot to add, the more complex your design is, the longer it takes to build. When you look at the plans try to eliminate unnecessary nooks and crannies and complicated rooflines!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 10, 2004
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    3,628

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    If you do live in your house while it's being built, you have to understand that it may take the builders longer because they are working around you and your stuff.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    7,404

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    It also depends on how long it takes to install utilities, including water sources. Do you need septic? Do you hook up to sewer? Do you have city water or a well? Underground utilities are great in Colorado.

    One big factor is to decide what you want, and not make any changes. Change orders really eat up the budget, and ruin the timeline. If you make a plan, then stick to it. Garages should be wider and deep than your biggest vehicle, big closets and other storage are great for living and for resale. A big pantry is great, and saves on trips to the store.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 29, 2006
    Location
    Colorado- Yee Haw!
    Posts
    2,550

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    We were looking to build a cabin in the mountains and actually had a guy recommended who sent us to a cabin he had built in Fairplay that really impressed us. He has built a bunch in that area. His prices were extremely competitive and his references were great. He said about 6 months to build what we were looking for which was a little smaller. Here's his web page http://www.alpinecustomcabins.com/ Not sure the style you are looking for, but I was impressed with his craftsmanship.

    ETA- If you go to the Evergreen gallery, we saw one of those.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 19, 2006
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    437

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzy Lady View Post
    If you do live in your house while it's being built, you have to understand that it may take the builders longer because they are working around you and your stuff.
    We kept our stuff in storage or boxed in the basement, and confined our "living" space to a couple of rooms with very minimal stuff to minimize this problem. I would not suggest trying to live there until all floors and painting are done.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2004
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    South Park
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    3,019

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4Martini View Post
    We were looking to build a cabin in the mountains and actually had a guy recommended who sent us to a cabin he had built in Fairplay that really impressed us. He has built a bunch in that area. His prices were extremely competitive and his references were great. He said about 6 months to build what we were looking for which was a little smaller. Here's his web page http://www.alpinecustomcabins.com/ Not sure the style you are looking for, but I was impressed with his craftsmanship.

    ETA- If you go to the Evergreen gallery, we saw one of those.
    Thanks, those look good - I like the Alpine 46x46

    And no, we wouldn't be living there until it is finished.
    A friend told me I was delusional. I almost fell off my unicorn.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 15, 2005
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    5,643

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    Quote Originally Posted by FitToBeTied View Post
    It depends on the complexity of the house, size of the house and current status of the housing market. We built ours during the last housing boom. The builders were juggling so many jobs that it took 13 months.
    And on the flipside ours was the last house on his list [thanks to our engineer being an asshat], and so finances being slim [builders use $ from next house to finish present house usually] and then his using our money to build his own house, and not paying the subs... it took a little longer and technically he never finished it, but walked off the job instead.
    There are so many variables... I think luck is really the key ingredient.
    Exposing faux rescues, backyard breeders and puppy/cat mills everywhere

    http://notesfromadogwalker.com/2012/...m-a-sanctuary/



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2006
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
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    3,742

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    Construction time depends on how often you change your mind. If you have a solid plan and do not alter the plan it is pretty straight forward... But change one thing and the dominoes start falling


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2004
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    2,739

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    Quote Originally Posted by clanter View Post
    Construction time depends on how often you change your mind. If you have a solid plan and do not alter the plan it is pretty straight forward... But change one thing and the dominoes start falling
    THIS! Double, triple, quadruple check your plans...make sure everything is as you want it the first time. You'd be amazed how much "little" changes add up in time & money. Be very "present" during the building process or have an advocate who is...one little thing done wrong that goes unnoticed can cause delays in the "undoing" as well.

    My husband built houses for years. The permitting process usually started several months before he ever started digging. The average was 4-6 months from excavating the foundation to final occupancy permit, the more changes...the longer it took. The quickest houses were the ones that were "spec"... not sold until mostly finished, they only buyer input was usually flooring, appliances and bathroom fixtures. . The ones that took the longest were sold up front to people who didn't have a clear understanding of the process, kept changing their minds, or tried to micromanage every detail. That said...we built our house ourselves and it took about a year. It's not huge, but nice size...2500 sq ft. We did it on nights and weekends with 3 small children, ages 3, 4 & 9 at the time. The only things we subbed out were plastering (we hung the board), plumbing and heating. There were times I thought I'd be divorced before it was all over, but we survived it. The upside is that we pretty much owe just what the house cost to build, but I wouldn't recommend it unless your relationship is rock solid and you can handle a lot of stress.
    "You can't blame other people. You can't always say what happened wasn't my fault. And you know what, even if you have an excuse, shut up."
    Bruce Davidson, Sr.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2002
    Location
    between the barn and the pond
    Posts
    13,648

    Default

    Ours was 6 months. 1800 SF main level, full basement same size, 600 sf upstairs.

    Make a plan and DO NOT change it and things can rock along pretty quick.
    A conclusion is the place where you got tired of thinking. (Steven Wright)



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec. 28, 2009
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    1,601

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    Ours took 9 months. We started in Sept, moved in the first of June.

    The winter months slowed some of the process down, but it was also at the slump of new construction. We thought this would be a great time to build, but most of the companies had let go most of their employees, so staffing was very slim. For example: We have a standing seam metal roof. There was one guy putting the roof up. (A hip roof). He'd measure, climb down, cut, climb up and place the piece of roof. REPEAT!!! I felt so bad for him. We also have dry stack stone for the exterior. This was another thing that took a long time. Getting inspections done in a timely matter was another time delay. The county had reduced the staff drastically and the one inspector would be booked.

    We were very lucky in that we lived 500yds from the new construction. We were able to be on site first thing in the morning and mid afternoon. Because of this we were able to get a couple of things fixed/adjusted before it got to the point of no return.

    I would advise walking through as many different houses as possible. This will give you an idea of what you like and what you don't. And by walking through a space (tape measure in hand) it will let you see how a space can be used and how you would feel in that space, or how your furniture would fit.

    We melded two plans into one for our home. We were able to use our builders draftsman to draw up the plans rather than going through an architect. This saved us a bundle, but we had a pretty straight forward plan and we knew our builder and trusted his faith in his draftsman.

    Best of luck if you choose to build. I would do it again, just not yet. I found it to be an all consuming project. We knew we were planning on living here a long time, so wanted to make sure it was perfect.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    ohio
    Posts
    769

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    We just moved into our new house...they dug the basement in February and we moved in this past weekend. However, we started planning it last August. Keep in mind that if you have to do a septic, some places have restrictions on what time of year you can put it in. In our area, you cannot install a septic from November until April.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2012
    Posts
    1,392

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    If you're really in a hurry, you can get a manufactured home...not the same as a trailer. Some of them are quite nice; two - story cape cod type. Get your foundation in, utilities to the site and bring on the house. Should be 3 months, tops.

    Stick-built is around 6 months. One thing you can do to save money is pick one of the builder's plans that he has built several times before. Always faster and cheaper than creating an 'original'.

    We're built 8 houses. I should have been a builder.
    Ride like you mean it.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb. 11, 2008
    Location
    gorgeos city
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    563

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    Quote Originally Posted by clanter View Post
    Construction time depends on how often you change your mind. If you have a solid plan and do not alter the plan it is pretty straight forward... But change one thing and the dominoes start falling
    This man speaketh the truth. As someone who has been involved in construction industry for close to 30 years, the single biggest thing that delays construction is homeowners making changes once things are under way. What may seem like a minor change to you could throw a major wrench in the schedule..... you change your mind, so subcontractor A has to redo something, or a new material has to be ordered which isn't readily available, so subcontractor B who was scheduled to come in right after A has to reschedule, so he goes off and does some other job and can't get back to the job for two weeks, which then screws up subcontractor C's schedule, and on and on.
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  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2004
    Posts
    3,113

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    And keep in mind that drywall is the half way point Don't be scheduling the move-in party or the furniture delivery too soon.

    What looks like real progress - the foundation, the framing, the closure, the rough-ins, then the drywall - well there's all that time consuming finish work.

    And like they said the Change Your Minds Construction Company charges more and takes longer!
    The truth is what you can get other people to believe.

    -- Tommy Smothers



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