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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulaedwina View Post
    that's not how you're supposed to mount from the ground anyway. She's climbing up on the saddle using the saddle to pull herself up. That's not how I was taught to mount from the ground. You hold the reins and the mane at the wither, you put your foot into the stirrup, you grip the pommel (ish), and leap, using the mane grip to help you continue the momentum and you land lightly in the saddle. You don't hang on to the saddle cantle and use it to drag your inert butt into the saddle -duh it will torque.

    Agree, the video shows a crappy job of mounting from the ground. I think it would look totally different if she had a big handful of mane.



  2. #22
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    Jan. 4, 2011
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    I can, if I can't find anything to climb on, but that would be rarely. Im small, we have large horses, mine is in a treeless saddle, and I have a crook knee, so lots of reasons not to.



  3. #23
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    Sep. 15, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by merrygoround View Post
    Almost 50 years ago I was told that mounting from the ground wasn't good for you, the saddle or the horse. Granted that was in pre-stretch breech era. amazing how many knees went through the breeches.
    I'm way less concerned about my knee going through the breeches than about the back seam giving way!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
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    May. 20, 2005
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    I'm living proof that White Girls Can't Jump (up on a horse). OK, I gave up being a "girl" about 35 years ago.

    Due to my failing athleticism (?) and horse's old back injury -- we MUST have a mounting block, the fender of the trailer, a big rock, a chair....



  5. #25
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    Apr. 15, 2008
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    there's one schoolie i ride who has lousy ground manners and will not stand at the mounting block; my options are waiting for someone to come hold the horse, or dancing around with him for a few minutes and mounting from the ground. *but* i drop the stirrup, use his mane to pull most of my weight up, and pull on the pommel as little as possible. i prefer to mount from a block, but with this particular horse i don't want to spend $10 of my lesson time waiting for someone to come hold him.

    i also agree that the video pretty much shows how *not* to do it.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Gravity works, and the laws of physics are a bitch.

    Member: Rabid Garden Snail Clique



  6. #26
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    Jul. 30, 2005
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    England
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChocoMare View Post
    Never. Necessity forced me to design a mounting platform that Mr. C'Mare built me. 5' 6" me wasn't ever gonna get on 17.3 Tank. Three steps up and three feet out. So nice.

    My knees appreciate it for the dismount too... the hard landing from that height about killed me.

    If I'm on trail and truly have to get off, I'll walk until we find an "up."

    Both my mares are good at standing next to whatever the "up" is
    I'm with you there! I'm shorter than you but all of mine are 16h+, with Rue tallest at 17.2. No way I'm getting up there without something to stand on.
    Horse Show Names Free name website with over 6200 names. Want to add? PM me!



  7. #27
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    May. 4, 2003
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    Canada
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    Mounting from the ground used to be a necessity when field hunting in case there was no swale or log to use.

    But unless one is athletic enough to leap lightly into the saddle, it is hard o knees, saddle and horse...and breeches!

    It was brought home to me years ago when I was watching a Pony Club lesson from a lounge upstairs in an indoor arena. Looking down as the horses came by showed how many crooked saddles there were, all pulled to the left.

    And after that I had an on-going war with the instructor when I legged my kid up into the saddle of her 17.1 hh horse. She had knee problems from growing too fast and that is what I did with MY daughter on MY horse in a lesson paid for by ME!

    Nowdays I can only get up from a mounting block since we always have v -ery tall horses.
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique



  8. #28
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    Oct. 30, 2009
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    Thanks for posting that. I've been trying to get some friends to use a mounting block for years. Telling them to watch the horse pin his ears when they mount hasn't worked. Reminding them that the stirrup leathers stretch enough without the stress of mounting hasn't worked. Maybe this will. It seems to be about macho or "real" rider thinking with my friends.

    I must comment on the nice clipping job in the video.
    "I've spent most of my life riding horses. The rest I've just wasted". - Anonymous



  9. #29
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    Apr. 22, 2011
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    I boarded at a place where there was a very arrogant kind of couple. They had two quarter horses around 15 hands apiece, and rode Western. I, on the other hand, had a 17 hand antsy warmblood. I cannot tell you how many variations of "REAL riders mount from the ground" I heard in those days The couple, who were not svelte, never seemed to notice the lurch and roll-eyed head shaking when they climbed aboard. My response was always "I can if I gotta, and that's good enough for me"
    Last edited by lovey1121; May. 30, 2013 at 05:10 PM. Reason: smartphone spelling errors :(



  10. #30
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    Dec. 23, 2010
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    Lancashire UK, formerly Region 8
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    I admit to feeling a wee bit demoted every time I have to search around for a suitable log or fence after dismounting mid-hack... but my SI injury and arthritic knees just won't allow any other option. And I do agree that it's overall better for my horse anyway.

    As a side note, how do you all dismount? I was taught the old fashioned way of keeping the left foot in the stirrup until both legs are on the left side. I suppose that might also put undue weight on one side of the horse, and nowadays the BHS at least teaches both feet out of the stirrups and a kind of flinging scissors-motion with the legs as the rider pivots on their lower torso. I've seen way too many horses inadvertently kicked in the rump that way, but I'm curious what the common practice is now...?
    Proud COTH lurker since 2001.



  11. #31
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    Mar. 25, 2011
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    Yes I was taught to vault out of the saddle -release both stirrups and do that backward scissor vault thingy. However my endurance saddle has a bit of a cantle so I take my right foot out of my stirrup, swing my leg over, hover briefly while kicking my left stirrup and then dropping to the ground. I know Western people step out of the saddle just as they step into the saddle, but I don't like the idea of leaving my foot in the stirrup that way -it strikes me less safe.

    Paula
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).



  12. #32
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    Mar. 24, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulaedwina View Post
    Yes I was taught to vault out of the saddle -release both stirrups and do that backward scissor vault thingy. However my endurance saddle has a bit of a cantle so I take my right foot out of my stirrup, swing my leg over, hover briefly while kicking my left stirrup and then dropping to the ground. I know Western people step out of the saddle just as they step into the saddle, but I don't like the idea of leaving my foot in the stirrup that way -it strikes me less safe.

    Paula
    Done correctly, at any point if hte horse starts going instead of standing the western rider should be able to swing back into the saddle. This was the officially correct method for dismounting western in the 4-H rule books when I was growing up. The swing right leg over, kick left foot out of stirrup, push away and drop method was the correct one for English.

    I pretty much never dismounted correctly for western unless a judge made us, as it's physically harder than dropping, I think.
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed



  13. #33
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    Apr. 15, 2008
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    i was taught to swing the right leg over and stand in the left stirrup, weight in hands on the pommel and cantle, then kick out of the left stirrup. but as an adult i was tsk-tsked at for doing this, and it was pointed out how dangerous it could be. so now i take both feet out and sort of scrabble my right leg ungracefully over the cantle and try not to fall down the side of the horse onto my ass.

    and yes, i swap my l/r stirrup leathers monthly, which is trickier with peacocks as you have to flip them around too.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Gravity works, and the laws of physics are a bitch.

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  14. #34
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    You know it's funny, but I think you're in an excellent position to escape if you do it that way - release right stirrup, swing leg over, kick out left stirrup, and drop to the ground. You've got nothing to get hung up on if the horse runs off -just drop. The other day my horse moved as I was trying to get on bareback and I was hanging off his side squealing like a girl and then it occurred to me to just let go. Sigh. It's like somebody freaking out about drowning and all they have to do is stand up

    Paula
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).



  15. #35
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    Apr. 22, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulaedwina View Post
    The other day my horse moved as I was trying to get on bareback and I was hanging off his side squealing like a girl and then it occurred to me to just let go. Sigh. It's like somebody freaking out about drowning and all they have to do is stand up

    Paula
    Oldtimer's Fear = that the ground gets proportionately farther away each year past your 40th birthday. I FREAKED out on Memorial Day when we were packing up the Thule cargo thingie atop the car - I was slipping off and PANICKED that I was gonna FALL. TIMMM-BERR...and I hopped down the 2 feet safely onto the grass. I can only blame Odtimer's Fear



  16. #36
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    Apr. 15, 2008
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    short horses. i was on a paso cross who did a sideways teleportation at a ground pole (oh the horrors!) and left me hanging off her neck. i stepped down, laughing hysterically. she was all, "what?! it's a pole! you never know what those things might do-!! stop laughing at me! you're short too!"
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Gravity works, and the laws of physics are a bitch.

    Member: Rabid Garden Snail Clique



  17. #37
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    Jan. 21, 2011
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    I mount from the ground periodically just to make sure it's a skill I still have (and that all my horses will tolerate it). This is true for everyone from my 14.2hh Morgan to my 16.3hh TB (and I have ground mounted all the way on up to a Clydesdale).

    I use the mounting block 99% of the time because it's easier on my legs and their backs, but I can't tell you how many riders I know who CANNOT get on even a 14hh pony from the ground. So what happens if you have to adjust something in the warm up ring at a show? Are you going to walk all the way back down to your trailer to re-mount? Or what if you go on a long trail ride and have to pee? Are you going to hand walk for potentially miles until you find something high enough for you to get on your horse?

    I competed in endurance for years with a 16hh standardbred and ground mounting was a skill that really came in handy a lot. Additionally, even after a weekend of frequent ground mounting, he wouldn't come up back sore at the vet check. I'm sure it's not great for a horse to get ground mounted constantly, over and over and over again, but sometimes I wonder if it's really as detrimental as people seem to think...

    A neat trick I learned is that bending the horse slightly toward you as you mount will keep the saddle from slipping.



  18. #38
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    Jan. 21, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulaedwina View Post
    You've got nothing to get hung up on if the horse runs off -just drop. The other day my horse moved as I was trying to get on bareback and I was hanging off his side squealing like a girl

    Paula
    A client of mine recently broke her wrist because the MOUNTING BLOCK FELL as she was getting on her mare. The horse stood perfectly still through the whole ordeal, and it was a freak thing, but it wouldn't have happened with ground mounting. You could make an argument for either side. When I use a block, I put my leg clean over the horse before putting a foot in EITHER stirrup. That way, if something goes wrong, I'm more likely to land on my feet.



  19. #39
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    Jan. 21, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulaedwina View Post
    Yes I was taught to vault out of the saddle -release both stirrups and do that backward scissor vault thingy. However my endurance saddle has a bit of a cantle so I take my right foot out of my stirrup, swing my leg over, hover briefly while kicking my left stirrup and then dropping to the ground. I know Western people step out of the saddle just as they step into the saddle, but I don't like the idea of leaving my foot in the stirrup that way -it strikes me less safe.

    Paula
    Sorry for the multiple comments. I still don't know how to quote multiple posts (oops).

    THIS. It's a big rule of mine to kick both feet out of the stirrups before dismounting, but western saddles can make that difficult (especially for less athletic riders). The method you explain above works really well for getting out of high cantled saddles. Great tip



  20. #40
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    Dec. 23, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by harnessphoto View Post
    So what happens if you have to adjust something in the warm up ring at a show? Are you going to walk all the way back down to your trailer to re-mount? Or what if you go on a long trail ride and have to pee? Are you going to hand walk for potentially miles until you find something high enough for you to get on your horse?
    Speaking for those of us who have chronic injuries or disabilities, we have many ways of coping. If I'm hacking out I take an extra stirrup leather with me to hang from the existing iron and create a kind of 'step'. Otherwise I just drop the leather low enough so that I don't overextend my sacroiliac area. At shows I've even been known to discretely place my step-up tack box in an area convenient to the warm-up and rings, just in case! And yes, I would hand walk for many miles to avoid risking more months of total immobility if I re-injure myself. I'm happy for you that you can mount from the ground without trouble, but it's really no indication to me of your general level of horsemanship.

    Thanks to everyone for the replies about dismounting... you've mostly confirmed my own thoughts. I know of at least one young rider who ended up being airlifted to hospital when she nicked her young horse's rump during the scissors-dismount.
    Proud COTH lurker since 2001.



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