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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 21, 2008
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    Sonoma County, California
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    2,506

    Default Hawk 2 horse straight load with side unload ramp -- yes or no?

    Hi, I'm looking to purchase a 2 horse straight load Hawk trailer and am wondering what you all think of the side unload ramp option.

    Thanks!
    Last edited by Watermark Farm; May. 29, 2013 at 01:04 AM.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 19, 2012
    Posts
    50

    Default

    Side unload is in my opinion always nice. the horses can see where they are going getting off. When they back off, you should always have somebody with some strength to make sure the horses don't slip off to the side. Also with a side ramp, they are better when you are by yourself.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 17, 2005
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
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    549

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    My friend has one. My horse (who is very picky about trailers) really liked it. The extra room/daylight inside (we had the door open, so they walk up to the chest bars and can see out) is lovely.
    Pisgah: 2000 AHHA (Holsteiner x TB) Mare (lower level eventing, with a focus on dressage)

    Darcy: 7? year old Border Collie x Rottweiler? Drama Queen extraordinaire, rescued from the pound in Jan 2010



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 12, 2009
    Posts
    465

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    I've never had one but would think it would be handy. If nothing else, would be nice to have to load my tack box for shows, since it's huge and heavy and I'm using by myself. Always nice to have one more option in the event of an emergency as well.
    It's not about the color of the ribbon but the quality of the ride. Having said that, I'd like the blue one please!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2012
    Location
    Northern California
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    1,053

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    I just bought one! Different brand though....I love it! It's much more open and airy. I haven't used the ramp to unload yet, but I imagine is only a matter of time



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2008
    Posts
    7,214

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    I have one and really like it, for a straight load. I prefer a slant, I have discovered...my horses haul better in the slant.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2003
    Location
    IN
    Posts
    4,177

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    That's what I have and I love it. I load/unload by myself all the time and I never have to worry about my girl backing off before I get the back bar up because she's used to going forward to go out. When it's really hot, I'll leave the door over the side ramp open as it opens to the back so doesn't get the wind resistance that the back doors get when they are left open (with a mask on her of course). I also love all the room in the front.
    Whatever you can do, or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it. Goethe


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
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    5,127

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    If I had a choice, I would not. For one reason: I don't like to haul extra weight I don't really need. I don't like ramps anyway, so my trailer is a straight step up and my horses are trained to self-load and back out. Even horses who don't know the trailer like it because the stock sides make it nice and airy. So, since I am unflappably practical and like to save adding weight for when it's something I really need, nope, wouldn't want it.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 21, 2008
    Location
    Sonoma County, California
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    Thanks for your replies. I currently own a 4 horse slant load with a side unload ramp and love this option. However, the horses are already at a slant so unloading out that side is easy. I am wondering how they horse 'makes the turn' from the straight stall onto the ramp in the Hawk straight load with side ramp?

    This trailer will be my second trailer, to use for local trips and places where I can't get the big gooseneck into easily. I have both straight and slant trailers and my horses like the straight load a lot better.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 21, 2008
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    Sonoma County, California
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    Default

    One more question about the chest bars. I've not owned a straight load with chest bars before, but love the concept of having a trailer where the horse can lower his head to eat and clear his nose. My current straight load has a manger.

    How common is it that a horse could wind up with a leg over the chest bar, and if this happens, how easily can you get them unpinned with weight on them?



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul. 4, 2000
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,804

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Watermark Farm View Post
    How common is it that a horse could wind up with a leg over the chest bar, and if this happens, how easily can you get them unpinned with weight on them?
    Not all that common with experienced horses; more likely with young / novice travelers. One of the reasons why I specifically bought a Hawk was how the chest bars come apart. If you look at the double pin arrangement, you will see that you can pull both pins, even with weight on the bar. Then a small shift of weight / movement from the horse will cause the bar to drop free completely. I have never had to deal with this problem (though friends have). But if you pull the outside pin first, then the center post pin, the bar will drop with little or no damage.

    *star*
    "Avoid loud and aggressive persons, they are vexations to the spirit."
    - Desiderata, (c) Max Ehrman, 1926



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2006
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
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    4,051

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    Quote Originally Posted by Watermark Farm View Post
    One more question about the chest bars. I've not owned a straight load with chest bars before, but love the concept of having a trailer where the horse can lower his head to eat and clear his nose. My current straight load has a manger.

    How common is it that a horse could wind up with a leg over the chest bar, and if this happens, how easily can you get them unpinned with weight on them?
    There is always some one who has had a problem with anything and horses are known to do the impossible but after having had to pull a two year old out of a escape door who had hopped over a chest bar I would not have a trailer with chest bars and open front

    The horse had pasted out because it could not breath as all of its weight was resting on the chest bar... some how I was able to attach a lead to the halter and pull the horse over the chest bar and it flowed out the escape door since it was passed out.... she got up on her feet, looked around and reloaded without an issue



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2003
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    IN
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    On the chest bar, I haven't had that issue thus far. On turning the corner, the separator folds over. You take the right hand horse out first and then just move the separator over and walk the left hand horse out. My 16.2 hand girls have never had a problem with it.
    Whatever you can do, or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it. Goethe



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul. 10, 2003
    Location
    Michigan, USA
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    3,085

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    I'd rather have a horse with his front feet over a chest bar than a horse with its front end crammed in a manger. And the issue of not being able to lower their head with a manger is a total no-go for me.

    If you haul horses/ponies of vastly different sizes, I would recommend getting multiple attachment hardware welded on so you can raise/lower the chest and butt bars to an appropriate height.

    I have a rear-facing Hawk with 2 side-load ramps and like it. They don't add much weight at all, and are extra nice if you have a horse that is injured and you can't back out or turn around. It gets borrowed all the time for that.
    *CrowneDragon*
    As Peter, Paul, and Mary say, a dragon lives forever.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2008
    Posts
    675

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    Just had to take a horse to Rood and Riddle that was only standing on three legs. One hind up.The horse was able to hop onto the trailer up the rear ramp, but without the side ramp we did not know how we were going to unload. It sure as hell wasn't going to be able to back out. So if you can afford it, it is a great option.
    I have only experienced horses trying to climb up onto a manger, never over the chest bar. Perhaps they can get themselves off the chest bar easier, but I won't have a straight load with a manger. They don't seem to have that tendency with slants.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2008
    Location
    NJ
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    2,181

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    I've always had bp straight loads with ramps and chest bars. I really like that configuration and have not had an issue yet.

    I'm an eventer and my horses regularly stand in the trailer for extended times in between phases. If I am by the trailer or have someone keeping an eye on the horse, I leave the side door open for ventilation. If I weren't there to keep an eye on the horse, I wouldn't leave the door open because the horse may try to escape over the chest bar and out the side door. It's never happened to me but I've been told by others so I don't take the chance.

    I wish I had a 2 + 1 trailer! It would be so handy for competing and for the special situations mentioned above. It also eliminates the issue of horses flying out backwards when unloading or going rapidly backwards in the middle of trying to load.

    Since I do everything by myself, I would definitely choose a trailer with a side ramp the next time I bought a trailer. My current horse is the only horse I haven't been able to teach to self load and I think if I had a trailer with the side ramp, he would be a lot easier to load. I can get him on usually within 5 minutes, but he insists on backing out at least once during the process. If he had to walk on the trailer, turn around and back in, he wouldn't have learned this annoying little trick.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2011
    Posts
    492

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    My "dream" 2h BP trailer would be one with a front unload ramp...



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
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    I have chest bars as well and love them. Not only can the horse put his head down, but they are nice and padded for leaning and he can move his front feet out too. They are pretty high, so they would have to work to get a leg over, although horses can accomplish mind-boggling things.

    They can, however, get their head UNDER, so I do always tie them, although I use a breakaway "fuse" of hay string between my trailer tie and the wall.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2005
    Location
    Spotsylvania, VA
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    12,707

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    I just got this
    http://www.eclipsealuminumtrailers.c...ht-loads/st-sr
    and it took my "noway in heck am igoing to get on that trailer" all of 5 minutes to decide that this trailer was much more to his liking.
    I wasn't always a Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Oct. 5, 1999
    Location
    A place called vertigo
    Posts
    12,396

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    LOVE the side ramp. I load and unload via the side ramp. There is so much more room inside the trailer, and it feels much less claustrophobic to me. If I get a day with iffy weather, it's roomy enough I can set up a chair in the trailer and not have to sit in the truck.



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