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  1. #1
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    Default Really bummed, need some words of encouragement - Update Post #30

    Our 2013 filly was only a week old when her dam stepped on her right front fetlock. Upon initial x-ray it appeared that she only had a small sliver of bone chipped off the outside sesamoid. Our vets felt that with stall rest she could make a full recovery, and that quite possibly, she would reabsorb the very small fragment.

    She has been on stall rest for four weeks, and only this week has she looked better. Our vet came out to re-x-ray, and more bad news She now has two (much) larger chips off both of the sesamoids in the right front. Both chips are off the top, but they are too big to reabsorb. I can't remember the medical term he used, but he said those fractures were probably there originally but we couldn't seem them yet, because 'xyz' (don't remember terminology) and they weren't yet displaced.

    He has given her a guarded prognosis at doing any sort of work under saddle, she definitely will not event or hunt. I'm heartbroken. She's a really nice filly, and I absolutely adore her temperament (she's very friendly and smart).

    Anyone have experience with this kind of injury? She will remain on stall rest for at least a few more weeks (she is nearly sound), and our vet is going to speak to his partner, in addition to getting an opinion from a surgeon at Coosa Valley (Alabama).

    We had planned to market this filly as a performance animal, and now I don't know what to do. Obviously she can't be marketed that way, and I have my concerns about selling her as a 'broodmare only', as I'm scared she'd wind up in the wrong hands.

    Yes, we could potentially keep her to breed ourselves, but since all of our mares have been performance animals, and generally serve dual-duty in between foals, it's hard to keep another, that can't have a performance career. Most of our broodies are getting up there in years so we have to consider that they will be retired here too.

    How many of you have sold young fillies as broodmare only?
    Last edited by GAEventer; Jul. 10, 2013 at 06:57 PM.
    Fade to Grey Farm
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  2. #2
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    She may be o.k. for lower level performance but hard to say if she will hold up for anything higher. I think it is very individual. I have a young mare here that at 1 month of age fractured both front sesmoids in multiple places from her dam running her too hard. She was sound after about 4 months but wound up re-injuring one slightly the following year as a yearling. Since they healed up the second time she has had no issues but I am nervous about starting her undersaddle though she is old enough too now. I am using her as a broodmare at the time and may start her undersaddle for just low level/pleasure down the road. She has an amazing personality and so super sweet I would be happy to just even use her for a bit of trail riding if it was possible. But on the other hand she has been sound for a few years now but I would hate to cause any further issues. Her x-rays were not pretty and the vet recommended not riding her but then he also didn't figure she would every come sound and she has :-)

    I think in order to get much interest in her as broodmare only you will have to keep her to breeding age. That also gives you lots of time to assess how her leg has healed. If she is sound at 3yrs old maybe start her undersaddle and maybe she would be fine for lower level dressage or the such. It would open up a bigger market for you. If not then you could advertise as broodmare only then but I think until she is of the age to breed she will be pretty hard to sell at this age.
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  3. #3
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    What a shame. Are there no surgical options?
    Click here before you buy.



  4. #4
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    Mar. 6, 2005
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    S. Carolina
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    Don't give up. Youngsters heal better and faster than mature horses. Jingles for you filly!


    3 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
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    Aug. 14, 2000
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    Clarksdale, MS--the golden buckle on the cotton belt
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    With something as well bred as she is, I'd spring for a vet school opinion from either Auburn or UGA or UF. Perhaps they can remove the chips; perhaps they can use something to fix them in place until they go ahead and merge with the rest of the bone. Sesamoid injuries are in lots of young race horses and, IIRC, are often repairable.

    There ought to be some really decent racehorse vets in SC, thanks to Aiken.

    You'd just have to disclose the repairs to a buyer.

    Quote Originally Posted by flyinghorse View Post
    Don't give up. Youngsters heal better and faster than mature horses. Jingles for you filly!
    "I'm a lumberjack, and I'm okay."
    Thread killer Extraordinaire


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  6. #6
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    I *think* she will become sound, but have been told that high impact work could be catastrophic. 'High Impact' could be different for each individual! Even if/when she becomes sound I'd still be nervous about starting her u/s, I know that's a way down the road, but I was hoping, and appreciate some of your real life experiences.
    Fade to Grey Farm
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    *NEW* website:www.fadetogreyfarm.com



  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    What a shame. Are there no surgical options?
    Our vet will be talking to, and reviewing the x-rays with, Dr Murray (Coosa Valley Equine) tomorrow; Coosa Valley has a surgical unit and is often a better option than dealing with one of the universities. Our vet feels the chips are most likely too big to remove, but there may be the option of screwing them down. That being said, it may not really help in regards to being able to compete her at a higher level. She is almost sound so if surgery isn't going to greatly enhance our odds, we may give her another month of rest and see if she'll become sound.
    Fade to Grey Farm
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    *NEW* website:www.fadetogreyfarm.com



  8. #8
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    Mar. 8, 2004
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    I would send the xrays to Dr Richardson at New Bolton or the like and let them weigh in on it. This isn't something I would leave to a local clinic, you want someone who has seen thousands of them over the years. Usually they will evaluate them for your vet for free of very little.


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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cindy's Warmbloods View Post
    She may be o.k. for lower level performance but hard to say if she will hold up for anything higher. I think it is very individual. I have a young mare here that at 1 month of age fractured both front sesmoids in multiple places from her dam running her too hard. She was sound after about 4 months but wound up re-injuring one slightly the following year as a yearling. Since they healed up the second time she has had no issues but I am nervous about starting her undersaddle though she is old enough too now. I am using her as a broodmare at the time and may start her undersaddle for just low level/pleasure down the road. She has an amazing personality and so super sweet I would be happy to just even use her for a bit of trail riding if it was possible. But on the other hand she has been sound for a few years now but I would hate to cause any further issues. Her x-rays were not pretty and the vet recommended not riding her but then he also didn't figure she would every come sound and she has :-)

    I think in order to get much interest in her as broodmare only you will have to keep her to breeding age. That also gives you lots of time to assess how her leg has healed. If she is sound at 3yrs old maybe start her undersaddle and maybe she would be fine for lower level dressage or the such. It would open up a bigger market for you. If not then you could advertise as broodmare only then but I think until she is of the age to breed she will be pretty hard to sell at this age.
    That's along the lines of what I was thinking, that I may have to sit on her a little longer, and potentially market her as a three year old. It'd be awesome if she heals enough to do lower level dressage, both of her parents are great movers, but dang, I really wanted to see the little girl jump She, I do believe, would like to go on tour with the Lippizzaners. She is very, very good at standing on her hind legs! As you can see here and here and here!

    I am VERY thankful that she has a great personality, nothing would be worse than having a bratty foal on stall rest! She nickers and runs to the door whenever we speak to her, and she loves to be petted and scratched.
    Fade to Grey Farm
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    *NEW* website:www.fadetogreyfarm.com



  10. #10
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    Aug. 21, 2012
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    I'm so sorry this has happened to your little one.
    We recently had a foal who was stepped on by mom and a back leg sustained a relatively severe fracture. There was no dislocation and we did have it casted for about 30 days or so. Our foal healed up and laid new bone down quite quickly. There is no evidence of a fracture on recent xrays. We treated fast and agressively with excellent vet services. It was notable that the foal healed faster 'after' the cast was removed and the foal could move around more. It took several months of hand walking the mare to prevent the mare from running the foal, before the foal was fully recovered. The foal was allowed free excercise about 12 weeks after the initial fracture, but we continued for about 6 months of hand walking the mare. Yes, the foal was weaned very late, but was also behind in development due to the whole ordeal.
    If you can get the 'right' vet services...quickly...your foal may have a better chance. As foals they are growing and remodleing bone very fast right now...I would not wait to seek expert help.
    Btw, I learned that fractures are extremely common in new born calves...I guess they get them when there are pulled out with chains...I didn't know that before. You may find better help with a teaching school that does a lot of cattle/cows.
    Depending on where you are located, equine vets may not get alot of opportunity to deal with foal fractures...that was what I was told by my equine vets.
    Good luck to you and your little one.


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  11. #11
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    Nov. 13, 2006
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    Default

    I would call rood and riddle or haygard and request a consult. They won't charge that much to read your radiographs and they've certainly seen everything.

    We had a colt that broke both sesamoid s when he was a week old. Unfortunately he was in ky at the time so I don't know details. Shipped him out here as a weanling and he is still racing at the age of 5. He is conformationally challenged to boot, but his sesamoid injury has never bothered him



  12. #12
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    Jul. 21, 2011
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    First off, I wish this hadn't happened.. Hugs to you..

    I have no similar experience, but I do agree with those who suggest disseminating the x-rays (far and wide) to see if you can find a vet who has experience with this and knows what can be done, and what has, and has not, worked well.



  13. #13
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    Jun. 16, 2007
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    Default Important to know

    I have both known a filly(Irish Sport Horse) who had a fracture(not a chip or chips but a fracture) and was treated...is an unsound adult now with expensive shoes..she is unsaleable and her owner does not want to breed anymore...you can have her for free. And I have put thousands of dollars into treatment of fillies(sepsis) twice. One ended in euthanasia as a yearling and the other is sound but flawed adult (Irish Draught)and I am not interested in breeding anymore...she is looking for a good home. They are lovely horses but not salable. They will never recover the money spent on saving them which I knew but I don't know if I can keep her safe her whole life. I love my mare...you are very very emotionally invested in these foals...and it would be very hard to send her off to most homes. I am not sure what the ISH filly cost in care but both my septic fillies were over 10K. Consider where this filly will live her life. Consider she will likely be unsaleable even if she recovers completely which is the most unfair of all. People imagine they can have perfect horses and will politely decline to buy a history...unless you give the filly to them and then will they be the best home for the filly. It was a learning experience and the wise decision would have been to euthanize the foals. PatO


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  14. #14
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    May. 23, 2012
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    I am so incredibly sorry to hear that news GAEventer!!! How incredibly heartbreaking Fingers crossed she heals up just fine, but even if she doesn't, do please keep me in mind for her in the future as a brood mare! I adore her bloodlines and simply love the cross....
    Lots of jingles and healing thoughts to her!!!
    www.muskokalakesconnemaras.com
    Wonderful ponies for family or show!


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  15. #15
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    Several years ago we had a broodmare step on her newborn filly's knee. There were several chips. It was suggested we send her to a surgeon, but for various reasons, we didn't think the mare/foal would make the trip at that time. We had our local vet drain fluid to buy time, then a month or so later when they were more likely to come through the trip well, sent the mare/foal to a vet clinic in Virginia (Spurlock's) who have vets we trust for the hard calls.

    They did arthroscopic surgery on her knee. She was a TB and although the vet said she should be racing-sound, we chose NOT to send her for race-training. Knees are tough enough to keep sound at the track without this extra issue. She is riding sound, although I am not sure she is eventing sound.

    Unfortunately, when you add my post to the previous ones, you can see that it is really a crap shoot & a personal decision.

    I am sorry to hear, and wishing you the best.
    Hidden Echo Farm, Carlisle, PA -- home of JC palomino sire Canadian Kid (1990 - 2013) & AQHA sire Lark's Favorite, son of Rugged Lark.



  16. #16
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    I too am sorry to hear this happened to your sweet filly, but can echo the thoughts of others in that foals very often do heal very well and go on to live useful lives.
    Even if she is not an U/L prospect that she might do well at the lower levels, and also with her breeding be a valued broodmare.
    Given her pedigree, would she not would be worth keeping in your own breeding program?
    #ThankYouHillary


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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by columbus View Post
    I have both known a filly(Irish Sport Horse) who had a fracture(not a chip or chips but a fracture) and was treated...is an unsound adult now with expensive shoes..she is unsaleable and her owner does not want to breed anymore...you can have her for free. And I have put thousands of dollars into treatment of fillies(sepsis) twice. One ended in euthanasia as a yearling and the other is sound but flawed adult (Irish Draught)and I am not interested in breeding anymore...she is looking for a good home. They are lovely horses but not salable. They will never recover the money spent on saving them which I knew but I don't know if I can keep her safe her whole life. I love my mare...you are very very emotionally invested in these foals...and it would be very hard to send her off to most homes. I am not sure what the ISH filly cost in care but both my septic fillies were over 10K. Consider where this filly will live her life. Consider she will likely be unsaleable even if she recovers completely which is the most unfair of all. People imagine they can have perfect horses and will politely decline to buy a history...unless you give the filly to them and then will they be the best home for the filly. It was a learning experience and the wise decision would have been to euthanize the foals. PatO
    We have taken that into mind, but if there is a chance for her to be at least pasture sound, I don't think I can do it. She does have a great pedigree for sport and will be registered with the IDHSNA as a sport horse. I hope that she'd be sound enough to be presented for inspection.

    I do take their future homes and care seriously, and that's why I'm concerned about selling her as a broodmare only. When do make a final decision on whether or not we'll try to market her, I will be looking for someone like Muskoka Lakes that I know will do right by her.

    Fred - We are weighing our options, I like her a lot, and think she's quality enough to use in our own program, but her dam is 20, and I have to consider that she'll be retiring soon. I've always sold our youngstock rather quickly (out of 12, we sold all but 2 before they were 2 years of age, most were sold as yearlings); I have already retained one filly from this same line as my future eventer so I'm trying to weigh all my options.

    We are hoping to sell two of our imported ponies this year, so if that goes as planned (ha!) it will relieve some of the stress!
    Fade to Grey Farm
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    *NEW* website:www.fadetogreyfarm.com



  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by MuskokaLakesConnemaras View Post
    I am so incredibly sorry to hear that news GAEventer!!! How incredibly heartbreaking Fingers crossed she heals up just fine, but even if she doesn't, do please keep me in mind for her in the future as a brood mare! I adore her bloodlines and simply love the cross....
    Lots of jingles and healing thoughts to her!!!
    Muskoka - Your name has come up
    Fade to Grey Farm
    Eventing, Foxhunting & Connemaras
    *NEW* website:www.fadetogreyfarm.com



  19. #19
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    Thanks GAEventer.... I will keep thinking healing thoughts for her... babies DO have that funky ability to bounce back from the unbouncable
    www.muskokalakesconnemaras.com
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  20. #20
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    I totally agree that you need to go to the best. -- send xrays, photos, videos. And I feel that with a baby that young, the most a typical vet (non specialist) can offer is an educated guess, and I think vets/docs are cautious in their statements. There is so much growth and development yet to go in this filly, if you can get experts in on the case to guide you you're going to maximize your chances of a good outcome. GOOD LUCK!
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