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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 25, 2013
    Location
    South of Edmonton, Alberta
    Posts
    62

    Unhappy Horse afraid of people due to static electricity shocks

    I am nearly in tears as I write this.. I am so disheartened.

    I have an 8 year old mare who is having issues. In the last month or so she has gone from an in your pocket, first to the gate, loves attention kind of horse to one who is afraid of people and won't let anyone catch her or touch her. This was a big mystery to me until earlier today as no apparent traumatic human encounter was glaringly obvious. It all began while I was out of the country for a few weeks and my hubby was caring for her at our neighbor's ranch where we board our three horses. He said that nothing traumatic had happened to cause it, but that one day he went over there and she simply would not let him anywhere near her.
    Since I have been home, I went out there the very girst day back and she came up to me like she always has, but the very next day wouldn't let ME anywhere near her either. (For those of you who might be tempted to suggest that she was simply trying to get out if work, this mare has been on holiday from work for 8 months due to medical issues I was dealing with that prevented me from riding etc. She has only been coming up for grooming and positive interaction.) It has taken me three weeks to get to the point where I can catch her, groom her, and do ground work with her again, but she still does not WANT me to touch her, and looks away and moves away at any human touch. She really does not wish to have much of anything to do with people by choice, it is obvious in the way she acts. She is like a completely different horse. So anyway, today I brought her up for grooming outside her pasture and everything seemed to be going OK. I was finishing up grooming her with the soft brush and she was pretty relaxed but alert. Well, we live in a very dry place, and static electricity had apparently built up, and when I put my other hand on her neck it discharged a HUGE shock. She just about jumped out if her skin and wanted to run away from me, no attempt to console her made any difference, all she knew was that my touch HURT. I distracted her with some ground work exercises, disengaging the hindquarters and such and she calmed down after several minutes.

    Back in the winter time a similar thing happened where I walked out into the pasture on a very cold -30 C day and she came up to greet me. Well, I normally greet my horses by bending slightly at the waist, and blowing into their noses etc.. On this particular day my mare touched her nose to my winter hat and got zapped right in the nose. She just about had a heart attack and ran off, no amount of coaxing would get her to come near me the rest of the day, and she was VERY wary of me for days afterward.

    So now, this static electricity business has turned into a HUGE issue and working with her is taking up all of my time. It is my guess that my hubby had inadvertently shocked her one day while he was grooming her etc while I was away and that is why she wouldn't come near him the next day. Let me also add that they are fenced in with electric fencing, not sure if this has anything to do with it.

    I am so discouraged, sad, and frustrated that I could cry. It took me three weeks to begin gaining her trust back and now all that work was for nothing and we are back at square one all over again. At least now I know what the root cause is anyway, but I have NO CLUE how to fix this. Anyone have any ideas??? We need HELP!
    Thanks everyone...



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct. 11, 2011
    Posts
    191

    Default

    I just googled it coz heaps of the horses on our agistment property have that problem too. Mine don't interestingly enough and the only difference is that they don't wear light rugs. Just heavy rugs. Could that be a correlation??



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 11, 2011
    Posts
    191

    Default

    Oh ps. There's HEAPS of ideas on old mate Google!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 7, 2004
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    1,246

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    Make sure your footwear is better at earthing electricity than hers! Wear natural soled shoes / boots or even get metal heel plates put on. Then her touching you will cause you shocks but not her.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 18, 2004
    Location
    Catonsville, MD
    Posts
    6,966

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    I haven't googled, but I shocked my mare that way once this past winter, and fixed it by getting my hands damp when I handled her, and with of course cookies.
    I tolerate all kinds of animal idiosyncrasies.
    I've found that I don't tolerate people idiosyncrasies as well. - Casey09




  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 7, 2007
    Posts
    1,430

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    Had this problem with the quarter sheet and fleece cooler. Static Guarded both to death, which stopped him from being shocked again. To regain his trust of both objects, I fed him LOTS of treats, while holding the sheet and sometimes right out of the sheet.

    You have to do everything you can to stop from shocking her and then provide a ton of positive reinforcement that you're okay again. She'll come around as long as she doesn't get shocked again.


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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    46,285

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    Happens with dogs too here, we are so super dry, lizard, desert dry.

    Water is your friend, carry a spritzing bottle or a wet hand towel and use that first, before touching her.

    Now, any time a horse for any reason is hard to catch, you don't want to keep that horse in the situation where it can be hard to catch, training 101.
    Be proactive and put the horse up and work at catching it several times a day, until it remembers that is what it needs to do.
    Don't turn it out before you have it retrained and let it practice running away from you, if a horse you can catch out there is important to your management.

    Many cowboys can't catch their horses, they run them into something and rope them.
    That is not a problem for them.
    Most of us want to be able to walk up to our horses or better, call them to us, so that is what we have to train our horses for and reinforce it.
    I have trained plenty of cowboy horses that at first almost go over a fence if a human approaches them with a halter, expecting to be roped.
    They are worse than a feral horse that doesn't know what you want, is just wary, not scared out of it's wits.

    I hear you, it is very disheartening at several levels and it is causing you anxiety and anguish that she is so scared and with reason, shocks hurt!

    Now, just get on with the retraining with a smile, all will be fine, just as if you were training for some other you do with her.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 9, 2012
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    NYC=center of the universe
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    2,117

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    I had a similar, though not as bad, issue with my mare after I zapped her something ferocious on her muzzle. Lots and lots of hand-fed treats got my mare's head out of the stratosphere!

    Now I really should do something to avoid shocking her. Yesterday I think she got mini shocks as I was brushing her. I didn't feel anything, but she was getting upset.
    Born under a rock and owned by beasts!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 26, 2008
    Posts
    2,308

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    I have a horse who seems to hate the sound of electric discharges...she flinches at the shock itself, but anything that has a similar "clicking" sound makes her agitated. Camera flashes have a similar effect, and lightning. This horse HATES being shocked. I am not exaggerating, if you put her on one side of some fence posts with NO FENCE, she'll avoid trying to walk between them for DAYS, just in case there's electric.

    My horse is now well broke, a working horse...she got over the huge "spook and run away" thing, but it did take a while. It's just something that she had to respond appropriately to...the panic/run away was an overreaction...I don't WANT to shock her, but it's something that happens, she needed to respond appropriately. Flinching is fine, I don't mind her getting a bit tense, even the odd jig step...jerking her head up, pulling/setting back, running off...not ok.

    Make sure that you don't get upset by the shock/flash...it's tough, but if you act like it's no big deal, she will eventually start to trust that it is no big deal. If you startle and immediately make a fuss of consoling her, she'll keep thinking that it is a big deal and act out. Cookie, pat, return to grooming. If she does blow up, ok, make sure you're safe, and as soon as she is calm enough, just lead her right back to where the event occured, and go back to whatever you were doing.

    I think that the anti-shock stuff for laundry is called "static guard" here, it's an aerosol. This might help de-static your brushes and clothes. Different types of brushes will have different tendencies to create a buildup of charge on the horse, you can experiment and make sure that you use the less static-collecting ones...although as you use any brush it will collect oils and dirt and probably not accumulate charge as bad.
    Lifestyle coordinator for Zora, Spooky, Wolfgang and Warrior


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  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 25, 2013
    Location
    South of Edmonton, Alberta
    Posts
    62

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    Thanks for the responses everyone, I truly appreciate all of your thoughts and ideas.

    I guess I should have given more details in my original post. This mare is pasture boarded on our neighbor's ranch of a couple hundred acres. There is a barn, but there is not a chance in hell that I would get her or any of my horses in it b/c it also doubles as the ranch owners shop where he cleans and dresses his hunting kills. (Horrible place to do that, really.) So, keeping her up in the barn is not a good option. I don't really have any small padocks to keep her in right now that have both good access to water and hay/forage, not to mention that she turns into a totally neurotic fence running maniac if paddocked off from her herd mates, which only causes more problems (ie: extreme buddy sourness) when reunited with them.
    This mare is such high maintenance, truth be told! She is my "problem child."

    I only blanket her in the very coldest part of winter, like -40, or when we are expecting a lot of snow. Blankets and coolers are not an issue for us because we rarely, if ever, use them.
    It is more the static that builds up ink the brushes and in people's bodies that gets discharged upon touching her that are causing a huge problem. I think I will try the spray bottle and Static Guard ideas. I've never lived in such a dry climate before, so this is totally foreign to both her and I, I never even thought to use static guard. We never had this problem when we lived in KY!

    Again, thanks everyone for your replies and ideas, they are greatly appreciated!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 7, 2005
    Location
    Lancaster, PA
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    5,380

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    Discharge yourself before you handle her. Touching a metal part of your car will do.


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  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 10, 2008
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    616

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    Body brushes will really build up charge, wear a damp glove on one hand and after you pass the body brush over her, neutralize the bristles by touching them to your glove. BTW, you will not feel much sting with a glove as opposed to with your bare hand. Same goes for your mare. The first time you touch her, lean into her a bit and let the the static discharge on your coat or through your clothes. Sounds wacky but it does work haha
    "Disapproval of the way other people run their businesses and treat their horses is the meat and drink of the hunter-jumper industry."
    Working Student Blog
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  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2010
    Location
    Alberta
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    5,055

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    Moisturize her coat too: that Healthy Hair Care (or something similar) works well.

    She is just reacting as a rational horse would to an electric fence.
    Freeing worms from cans everywhere!


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  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2003
    Location
    Alberta
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    5,747

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    Like what CHT said, moisturize her coat too. I use the one on the below link and it's amazing. We have incredible electric shocks in Calgary from the dryness and since I've started using this I've never zapped my horse. You mix it with water and it lasts for months!! It smells divine and really helps keep the horse dust free and glossy (but not slippery so you can use it all over) as well. When I'm grooming I spray it onto his body on the really dusty parts and then also give my groom brushes a spritz. Amazing stuff!

    http://www.bigdweb.com/Healthy-Hairc...ductinfo/1014/
    Go Ahead: This is a dare, not permission. Don't Do It!


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  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2012
    Posts
    314

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    My horse had a similar thing happen to him. I kissed him on the nose, and shocked him pretty badly. Honestly I probably shouldn't have kissed him on the nose anyway. He didn't get too upset, though, but he won't let me kiss him on the nose unless he is awfully relaxed, otherwise he goes into giraffe mode with his head straight up in the air! I can touch his nose and brush his face, etc. he just gets worried when my face is near his.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    May. 25, 2013
    Location
    South of Edmonton, Alberta
    Posts
    62

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    Been using gloves, spray bottle etc, works great unless I forget. I forgot a few days ago and gave her a tiny shock that caused her to jump and run away, but I was able to work my way back up to her and finish after wetting the brush.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan. 28, 2013
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    Southeastern US
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    When all else failed, I used to spit on my brushes when I lived in Colorado (blush).
    “You made us for yourself, O Lord, and our heart is restless until it rests in You."

    -St Augustine


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  18. #18
    Join Date
    Sep. 6, 2012
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    Moved South from North Pole
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    1,019

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    What is worse is the owner accidentally touching electric tape when trying to put on a horse's halter. The horse will not appreciate that at all. BTDT.

    Be careful not to touch the face. Static electricity shock to the side or shoulder is not nearly as bad as a shock to the nose or ears.


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  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb. 17, 2000
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    3,526

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    I would be looking into a possible thyroid issue or lymes or other things that may cause skin or muscle sensitivity.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    May. 25, 2013
    Location
    South of Edmonton, Alberta
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    62

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    She has not had any other symptoms of Lyme, she has always been a very sensitive mare, and she is fenced in partially by hot wire. I believe now that she is simply reacting like a normal horse does to electric fencing, by avoidance. There is no other problem with muscle or joint stiffness or pain that is even remotely evident. Now that I am taking extra care to prevent static electricity shocks we are having no problems.



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