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  1. #41
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    Jun. 7, 2002
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    I LOVE these threads and I want to thank EVERYONE for their recommendations!

    I am now very intrigued by Edward Rutherfurd's books! Sarum, The Forest, Paris...lots of reading in perspective!

    I really enjoyed Sharon Kay Penman's books, especially her Eleanor of Aquitaine and Welsh series.

    Robin Hobb's The Assassin series was also quite good. The books are short but there are many in a series.

    Ken Follet's Fall of Giants and Winter of The World (3rd book coming soon?) are also very good.

    Another series that I fell into by chance and absolutely loved (if you're into dystopian novels) is WOOL.

    I am currently reading Salman Rushdie's Midnight Children, 500 page book, great storytelling.
    Ottbs - The finish line is only the beginning!



  2. #42
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    Oct. 29, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Yonder View Post
    Anna Karenina is fascinating.
    God I LOVED Anna Karenina! The classics endure because the writer understood human nature, and their characters are still relate-able 100 years later.
    "Things turn out best for the people who make the best of the way things turn out." ~John Wooden

    Phoenix Animal Rescue



  3. #43
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    Feb. 25, 2012
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    I love the recommendations andreminders too!
    James Clavell! for SURE - I started with Tai pan actually, then NOble House and then Shogun. But Taipan was my favorite, but...

    COUNT OF MONTE CRISTO! someone recommended and really, fiction does not get much better than this, ever! Sure, three musketeers is great and man in the iron mask but, the Count...just a masterpiece and LONG! But... not long enough! The main story will suck you in and all the other back stories as well (and there are plenty!) I am off to find my copy AND to look for Rutherford's "the forest" as well!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #44
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    Jul. 14, 2003
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    "Shantarum" by Gregory David Roberts was also a really good long (944 pages) book. It is the fictionalized autobiography of a man who escaped from a maximum security prison in Australia and went to live in a Bombay slum.
    "Against stupidity the gods themselves contend in vain" ~Friedrich Schiller



  5. #45
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    Sep. 5, 2005
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    Well, anything by Stephen King. Also: Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell; The Queen of Bedlam; The Far Pavilions (this is very good - older, but was very popular when it came out. An epic romance of India under the British.)

    The ORIGINAL Robert Ludlum books, not these crummy new imitations. Ditto the original Tom Clancy ones. The original DUNE novels by Frank Herbert.
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry



  6. #46
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    Apr. 26, 2003
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    SoCal
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    If you are into biographies, Irving Stones' "Lust for Life" and "The Agony and the Ecstasy" are very good.



  7. #47
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    Dec. 20, 2003
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    Hillsborough, NC
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    I will second Stephen R. Donaldson (Thomas Covenant series) and third Robin Hobbs.

    As a former Russian lit major, anything by Dostoevsky or Tolstoy. (Sholokhov if you want to go 20th Century).

    And then there's always William Makepeace Thackary's Vanity Fair.

    If you like mysteries, you could also go with a series. Anne Perry has two that are placed in Victorian England that are quite entertaining (read them in order of publishing since they kind of build on the prior books).

    Back in Sci Fi mode, I'd recommend these by Connie Willis: Blackout and All Clear. Really more like one long book but published as two. She writes really well, IMHO.
    Only one cat - must not be totally crazy yet!



  8. #48
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    Feb. 24, 2011
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    I haven't read all the posts:

    Anna Karenina
    War and Peace
    Don Quixote
    several John Fowles books
    several John le Carre books
    Les Miserables
    LOTR
    Lots of Stephen King stuff

    Of course a lot of non-fiction is pretty long. I just finished a biography of Catherine the Great that was outstanding.



  9. #49
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    Apr. 5, 2011
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    Anna Karenina and War & Peace are both excellent books. I think War & Peace is the better of the two. It takes about 200 pages to get all the characters straight though. It doesn't help that most of them have several pet names so they are called different things by different people depending on who is speaking. They're all just plays on their actual name, the equivalent of calling someone named William Will or Willie.

    My favorite book of all time is quite long, Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clarke.

    Also:
    House of Leaves by Mark Z Danielewski
    The City of Dreaming Books by Walter Moers
    The Stand by Stephen King
    The Hobbit (much better imo than the Lord of the Rings Trilogy)
    The Once and Future King by TH White - part of this book is what Disney's The Sword in the Stone was adapted from


    2 members found this post helpful.

  10. #50
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    Dec. 20, 2009
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    OK, my recommendations aren't quite as LONG as some others, more in the 400=600 page range, but: Elizabeth George writes great British type mysteries, and has done maybe 10? A lot. Also, Nelson DeMille, I don't know what they are - some mystery, some spy type stuff, also has written lots. I've read every one of both of these authors.

    Not long ago I read a long novel on Vietnam War, "Matterhorn" - its a tough story, but very well done.
    We don't get less brave; we get a bigger sense of self-preservation........



  11. #51
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    Sep. 19, 2009
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    Another Stephen King fanatic here. He is certainly my bucket of blood.

    I too, just finished reading 11/22/63 and Under The Dome. Pretty much anything by him is a lonnnnnng read. LOL. You develop good biceps picking up his books. The last book of his (along with Peter Straub) I read is The Black House - excellent. The prequel to The Black House is The Talisman. If The Black House has a sequel, I would love to know what it is. I would like to know what happens with the main character, Jack Sawyer, after that.

    King's, The Skeleton Crew, was quite "gushy." It has a series of short stories in a big book. "The Raft" was the goriest one of King's that I recall.

    I love Dean Koonz too. I quite enjoyed his The Darkest Evening of the Year. I like that Dean loves Golden Retrievers. The GR is the main character in this book. I think that he has telepathic powers.


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  12. #52
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    The Talisman and Black House are the only two that King/Straub collaborated on. I would love to see a third installment myself, but can't quite figure out how they would manage to get Jack back out of Mid-World. It was pretty clear that Jack wouldn't survive in the modern world.
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #53
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    Apr. 15, 2008
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    Yes, rutherford is simply incapable of doing 'short.'

    http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss...er%2Caps%2C241

    I just finished Painted Caves; man, that was a tough one. I have the tad williams otherworld books but haven't gotten to them yet. Katherine neville's The Eight was good, as i recall; have some ponderous tome called The eagle and the raven on the shelf here... The CS Friedman books are over 400 pp.
    Gravity works, and the laws of physics are a bitch.

    Member: Rabid Garden Snail Clique



  14. #54
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    Sep. 5, 2011
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    These are "golden oldies", but as such they're frequently available at very low prices (especially for used copies):

    Shogun, Noble House, & Tai-pan - both by James Clavell
    Anything by James Michener
    Gone With The Wind
    Lonesome Dove
    The Hobbit & The Rings Trilogy by Tolkien (if you're into that)



  15. #55
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    Jun. 20, 2009
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    Atlas Shrugged Which I describe as a very, very long story about a super smart, fearless woman who goes on a quest to save the world.

    Memoirs and Selected Letters Of Ulysees Grant. Starts off with several spiffy horsey stories including tales of some training errors, a description of how the US army broke feral mules to harness in a day, bull fighting in Mexico in the 19thC, and more good agricultural and youth tales. He's a smart guy with a wicked sense of humor. That will get you interested so you can into the rest.

    Guns, Germs, and Steel. Non-Fiction. One researcher's theory on why the industrial revolution happened when and where it did. It's pretty interesting to think that human development has relied on a close relationship with, basically, a very short list of animals and plants. Without these few animals and some key plants, mechanized civilization as we know it might never have happened. Or so this guy thinks.

    A book that was agonizing, but so fascinating I couldn't put it down, was The Tao of Equus. I don't go for 'woo-woo' stuff and that book is so full of wacki nonsense I just couldn't put it down. Seriously.... that horse you can't get broke to saddle...... might...... just be suffering from.... too much past life trauma..... I'll admit some concepts such as the 'non local mind' had me too intrigued to look away. But good mercy, that chick is bonkers!!



  16. #56
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    Feb. 4, 2009
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    Imajica. Clive Barker can write a horror/fantasy story that can't be beat. just a couple short of 1000 pages.

    http://www.amazon.com/Imajica-Featur...ywords=imajica



  17. #57
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    Sep. 19, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guin View Post
    The Talisman and Black House are the only two that King/Straub collaborated on. I would love to see a third installment myself, but can't quite figure out how they would manage to get Jack back out of Mid-World. It was pretty clear that Jack wouldn't survive in the modern world.
    In The Black House, Speedy Parker tells Sophie that Jack can visit the modern world for short periods then he must return to The Territories. Within days or weeks in the modern world, his wounds will come back. (I hope this is not a spoiler. SO much happens in this book with twists & turns that it is a suspenseful read.

    ... and yet again, Google is my friend:
    Jack Sawyer 3, or Talisman 3, is a temporary title for an upcoming book to be pusblished by Stephen King and Peter Straub. The book will be a sequel to Black House, and is projected to be the final volume of a fantasy trilogy that began with The Talisman.
    Now the next question is, when?


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #58
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    Sep. 5, 2005
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    WEBSITE WHERE YOU FOUND THAT??? Is it just rumor-mongering (considering they spelled "published" wrong!) or something legit?
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry



  19. #59
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    Mar. 1, 2003
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    I'll second the recommendation for The Agony and the Ecstasy - a (fictionalized) biography of Michelangelo. Very good.
    Blugal

    You never know what kind of obsessive compulsive crazy person you are until another person imitates your behaviour at a three-day. --Gry2Yng



  20. #60
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    Apr. 15, 2008
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    Oh, did anyone mention peter f hamilton? Another one who can't do short:

    http://www.amazon.com/Peter-F.-Hamil..._athr_dp_pel_1
    Gravity works, and the laws of physics are a bitch.

    Member: Rabid Garden Snail Clique



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