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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep. 12, 2004
    Posts
    1,059

    Default Does a pad like this exist?

    Is there such a thing as a pad that will spread weight over a larger area than the actual bearing surface of the saddle?

    My husband's is good for an English saddle, but given his size vs. his horses, I tend to think that the horse would appreciate some more.

    He doesn't want a western saddle, and prices on reactor panels make him blanch.

    The saddle has an adjustable headplate and gullet, so I can go w/ a thicker pad if there is something that would actually help out.

    ???



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    17,754

    Default

    This thing, supposedly:

    http://thecorrector.net/index.html

    http://thecorrector.net/sitebuilderc...ebtn24a-bw.jpg

    Had never heard of it, but there's a COTH poster who uses it and swears by it. Can't remember who!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
    Posts
    36,321

    Default

    I bought a Reactor Panel on ebay for a few hundred bucks once. They do pop up from time to time.
    Click here before you buy.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 12, 2004
    Posts
    1,059

    Default

    I've used the corrector...it mostly keeps the points and gussets from digging in. But it doesn't do anything about the middle.

    Horse just had to have his back injected in the area that it wouldn't do anything for - and he didn't seem too thrilled w/ it the one time we tried it on him anyhow.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
    Posts
    36,321

    Default

    Have you looked at cork pads? I bought one once out of pure curiosity as to how the material would work under a saddle, and it was actually kind of nice. A little bulky for my taste, but certainly not excessively so. I just cannot stand fussing with different saddle pads and virtually always go back to the same, simple 2-3 ones I prefer no matter what I try.
    Click here before you buy.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep. 12, 2004
    Posts
    1,059

    Default

    cork is a thot....i had had that thot once, but it left!

    will look into the smart panels - maybe in the extra lite fill - again!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
    Posts
    36,321

    Default

    I could be persuaded to part with mine for not much if you could use it. Just would have to find it!
    Click here before you buy.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2010
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    125

    Default

    I read on a treeless saddle group that some users cut sheets of thin lexan to place in a pad with pockets. From what I understand, the foam layer goes against the horse, then the lexan. You would need a pad with pockets. I filed the idea away as interesting, maybe that would work? The Yahoo treeless saddle discussion board was where I read it. Good luck!
    "Do your best, and leave the rest, twill all come right, some day or night" -Black Beauty

    http://trails-and-trials-with-major.blogspot.com/



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 30, 2006
    Posts
    1,156


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 12, 2004
    Posts
    1,059

    Default

    Gumshoe - I had thot about the SR's...but didn't know if they distributed weight or just kept pressure off the back?



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2011
    Location
    Southern WI
    Posts
    311

    Default

    CSI Saddlepads makes some English versions. They are pricey, but really comfortable for the horse. They are bulky and kind of make you feel disconnected from the horse, but are the best for the horse's comfort because they really cut out the pressure points and disperse pressure over a larger area. There is a reason you don't find many used!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2008
    Posts
    4,055

    Default

    I was going to chime in with SR or Suber pad too. Yes SR pads distribute the weight over a larger area. You can try it on yourself, put your hand on the floor, put the pad over your hand, and have someone wearing a boot try to step on and crush your hand through the pad.... you'll feel the pressure spread out.

    You know what also works really well, plain ol' felt. GOOD THICK PURE felt, the expensive stuff, the cheap stuff is garbage. The lighter the color the more pure the felt. The process of "felting" creates a structure that spreads out weight, and reduces friction - something a lot of people don't take into consideration with saddles and padding. Think on it, the horse's back is in motion, the rider is in motion, and here is this rigid thing in between = friction.

    There is a reason why cavalry used *folded wool* blankets as saddle pads and its not just so they could have something to wrap over themselves. Wool is a great material, folding layers removes friction, gives other layers something to slide against instead of the saddle sliding against the horse's back.
    Worry is the biggest enemy of the present... it’s like using your imagination to create things you don’t want.
    An adorable photography book, makes a perfect gift.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep. 12, 2004
    Posts
    1,059

    Default

    Does the SR stay off the spine? We just had to get a couple of his vertebrae injected, and am thinking a pad that stays up off the spine might be a plus point....

    On thick felt - I had been thinking to try a 5*....maybe in a 1/2"? Doesn't seem like the quarter would do a lot...but was worried about edges near the spine. Altho it seems like they shouldn't get all that much pressure from a treed saddle...



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2008
    Posts
    4,055

    Default

    Yes the SR is sewn down the middle and *peaks* over the spine, it makes no spine contact (in most cases, unusual conformation aside) and actually goes a good long way to protect it. I used mine under a treeless saddle to protect the spine on a horse that turned out to have broken withers, very sensitive spine. He liked the SR pad a great deal.

    SR pads are highly desirable and keep their resale value, so if it doesn't work for you you can resell it quite easily. Check ebay for used deals. Used in good condition they're generally about $150.

    They're also made to wear like iron and last decades. I bought mine used about 5 years ago (dressage, glove leather) and used it hard and it looks brand new still.

    Suber pads aren't formed like SR pads but a real suber pad has a channel free of cork filling down the center. For high withers I had to modify mine and cut a wither V, but mine is older. I believe Suber has a shaped high wither model now.

    I don't like thick felt pads that have that spine free channel, I see the edge of the felt creating a major pressure spot because felt doesn't compress (one of the reasons its so great).

    1/2" isn't terribly thick for a felt pad, which makes it a a good choice for an english pad and should conform nicely. Do pay attention to the channel width of the saddle however. That pad will want to fill up that space. If the channel is just wide enough for the spine then you might have pressure directly on the spine. Make sure the saddle's channel offers ample room for the pad to fill it up and still clear the spine.

    5* is the best in wool felt pads, and I believe will make you anything you wish. Diamond Wool makes good pads too, and in english shapes (I use the "aussie" style for dressage and just trim the bottom to fit). There is an Australian maker of fine felted wool pads too that I just covet, but the name escapes me. I think its Wallaby or something to that effect.

    If you're adventurous and crafty you can just buy F10 felt too, in the thickness of your choice, and cut your own pad.

    If your saddle doesn't offer enough room in the channel and you need a spine *free* design, consider something that "floats" like the SR, or a spine free pad design in a material that blends away without a hard edge like sheepskin, skito, suber, or prolite.
    Last edited by buck22; May. 25, 2013 at 02:16 PM. Reason: got my felt F's wrong! had tomcats and tom cruise on the brain!
    Worry is the biggest enemy of the present... it’s like using your imagination to create things you don’t want.
    An adorable photography book, makes a perfect gift.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep. 12, 2004
    Posts
    1,059

    Default

    Thanks, buck!



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr. 19, 2007
    Posts
    180

    Default

    Another vote for the CSI pad. I use one with my endurance and another with my western. Worth every penny. I do like my Skito, SR and CorrecTor, but the CSI is the winner ime.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2012
    Location
    Twin Cities
    Posts
    2,329

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by buck22 View Post
    You know what also works really well, plain ol' felt. GOOD THICK PURE felt, the expensive stuff, the cheap stuff is garbage. The lighter the color the more pure the felt. The process of "felting" creates a structure that spreads out weight, and reduces friction - something a lot of people don't take into consideration with saddles and padding. Think on it, the horse's back is in motion, the rider is in motion, and here is this rigid thing in between = friction.

    There is a reason why cavalry used *folded wool* blankets as saddle pads and its not just so they could have something to wrap over themselves. Wool is a great material, folding layers removes friction, gives other layers something to slide against instead of the saddle sliding against the horse's back.
    I was going to make this suggestion myself. and, even thought it is thick & seems heavy, wool is breathable. I ended up buying a really nice piece of merino wool felt and cutting it the size I wanted. You need to make sure there are no synthetics & you want good wool.

    A solid colored wool Navajo was also in my thoughts, but I couldn't find one that fit my list of requirements.



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