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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 4, 1999
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    1,887

    Default Grazing muzzle woes

    This is my first spring with my lovely Welsh pony, and therefore my first experience with a grazing muzzle. She came with a muzzle, and everything was going swimmingly until I realized that she was getting way too much grass through the hole. Alas, I bought a new muzzle and found that the hole in the new one was *much* smaller than the one she came with.

    She now has the new muzzle on and will not graze. She is basically sulking. It seems to fit fine, but she cannot figure out how to get grass through the hole. The vet says she will figure it out.

    Experiences? Are there certain brands that are better than others? I have seen one online called a GrassGuard muzzle, but it looks like they are only available in the UK.

    I feel awful seeing her pouting...but I do not want to risk her getting sick, as she was getting quite plump.

    Now, if I could create a grazing muzzle for myself, that would be a great thing! ;-)



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
    Posts
    36,321

    Default

    Your vet is right. Ignore the pouting. You would both look and be much sadder if you had to treat the pony for laminitis.
    Click here before you buy.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    13,223

    Default

    What Deltawave said. Listen to your vet. She will figure it out as soon as she realizes the pouting will not get her what she wants.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2002
    Location
    between the barn and the pond
    Posts
    14,495

    Default

    Feed her carrots through the hole a time or two. And is she on grass that is short enough for her to get the hang of it? Tall grass just frustrates them, I think.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 5, 2011
    Posts
    461

    Default

    My friend's mare with IR is doing the same thing with the deluxe muzzle from SmartPak. She now refuses to graze at all if it's on. I don't think it's a "pouting" issue. The horse probably realizes she expends a lot of energy for hardly anything. The horse gets a blade or two of grass out of every 10 tries. I'd probably give up too.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
    Posts
    36,321

    Default

    I watched my Shetland yesterday--she is a remarkably efficient eater through even a muzzle! She has the head-bob perfectly down to where when she plunks the muzzle down and wiggles it with her nose a couple of blades pop through the hole. She's still plump on her strict muzzling regimen, so she's now spending the night in a stall with a very scant hay net rather than having night-time hay with the skinny TB broodmare, much to her disgust.
    Click here before you buy.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul. 17, 2005
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    574

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    Your vet is right. Ignore the pouting. You would both look and be much sadder if you had to treat the pony for laminitis.
    Had to do this with mine. She was NOT pleased. At least this year she has a pony friend for a turn out buddy that is also muzzled. I have a picture somewhere of them both looking at me, while wearing their muzzles, with faces that say 'CLEARLY you're joking...'
    Pisgah: 2000 AHHA (Holsteiner x TB) Mare (lower level eventing, with a focus on dressage)

    Darcy: 7? year old Border Collie x Rottweiler? Drama Queen extraordinaire, rescued from the pound in Jan 2010



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2010
    Posts
    2,512

    Default

    Ignore the pouting.

    My mare stood in one spot for 8 HOURS STRAIGHT after I put the muzzle on the first time. Survival of the fittest or smartest clearly would not apply to her. Eventually she started walking around and by the next day progressed to throwing her face into the ground over and over. Day three she figured out how to graze and after a few waterboardings also managed to gauge the water bucket with her muzzle.

    I just invested in a new best friends muzzle and actually wish there was a way to reduce the hole size since she has mastered how to maximize the muzzle. I think it is rare that the hole is truly to small.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    11,160

    Default

    Not only must you ignore the pouting, when she does give up and start grazing, you must inspect the muzzle frequently. Some "problem solvers" figure out how to widen the hole.

    I haven't found a fix other than a new $$$ muzzle.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 27, 2008
    Posts
    2,687

    Default

    I certainly cannot advise you as I am having the same problem. My two cannot, will not, do not graze with the muzzles on. It's been about three or four weeks now.

    I go out every couple of hours and feed them a handful of hay through the muzzles. I don't want them fasting! And I take the muzzles off each night for about 8-10 hours, midnight until morning, which is when the grass has the least sugar (from what I've read).

    This does not seem like a good process to me. I'm not always available to go out and handfeed them.

    What I really wish is that there were a way to electronically open (widen) and close (narrow) the holes. I'd love to let mine eat their low-sugar hay five freely for five minutes an hour or so. Could somebody invent that for me?

    Here are pictures of my pathetic fellas.
    I have a Fjord! Life With Oden



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 27, 2008
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,805

    Default

    Ignore it. Mine sulked and would scream for me to take it off. I wasn't the meanie who put it on her so she thought I would save her from the indignity of it all. Too bad she didn't know I was the one who bought it in the first place. I fed her some grass through the hole, but she mostly figured it out on her own after a little while.
    Poor, poor horsie.
    You are what you dare.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    13,223

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cindyg View Post
    I go out every couple of hours and feed them a handful of hay through the muzzles.
    They certainly have you all trained.


    7 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2008
    Posts
    7,606

    Default

    if you hand feed and take muzzles off at night, of course they are not going to eat through the muzzle during the day. They will wait until it is easier. Put the muzzles on and leave them except for meals for a couple of weeks and this problem will go away. I go through it every year with my old man. When he gets good and hungry he gives in...usually about day 2-3. He's fine. He gets the muzzle because he is fat anyway so a little less grass for 2 days is not going to hurt him.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2011
    Posts
    348

    Default

    Id have to agree with leaving the muzzles on all the time. In my case, my mare was so pissed about the muzzle, that she would gorge on grass after I took it off for the evening. I didnt see much results doing it half on/half off.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2007
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    1,042

    Default

    I have a horse that pouted for three solid weeks.

    Of course it was in the dead of summer with all heat/humidity southern Middle Tennessee has to offer.

    I collared him in the farthest corner of 22 acres (in close proximity to his buds) and ponied him to the barn on the 4-wheeler --- every single day so he could eat hay and drink water.

    I almost caved but he finally started to eat thru the muzzle.

    It helped a lot to buy the Tough 1 Easy Breath muzzles, as they have a lot of room for the nostrils to get air. I could hear him struggling to breath in the Best Friend and Weaver.

    It's tough love for sure but it's a lot better than watching the horse suffer thru founder, knowing full well you may have prevented the founder had you put the muzzle on


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul. 17, 2005
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    574

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by merrygoround View Post
    Not only must you ignore the pouting, when she does give up and start grazing, you must inspect the muzzle frequently. Some "problem solvers" figure out how to widen the hole.

    I haven't found a fix other than a new $$$ muzzle.
    I bought a replacement rubber disk (with the hole in the middle) for the muzzles have metal bottoms for cribbing and just put it in the grazing muzzle with the 'enlarged' hole.
    Pisgah: 2000 AHHA (Holsteiner x TB) Mare (lower level eventing, with a focus on dressage)

    Darcy: 7? year old Border Collie x Rottweiler? Drama Queen extraordinaire, rescued from the pound in Jan 2010



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov. 18, 2011
    Posts
    93

    Default

    My mare did the same thing with the pouting until shoe figured out how to get it off. We tried to zip tie it and now she has figured out how to rip out all the stitching off the muzzle. Pouting is much better than the alternatives.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2009
    Posts
    481

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GraceLikeRain View Post
    after a few waterboardings also managed to gauge the water bucket with her muzzle.


    I almost died laughing reading this... thank you
    "Be the change you want to see in the world."
    ~Mahatma Gandhi


    2 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2009
    Posts
    1,246

    Default

    I moved to a new farm with good pasture from a farm with dry lots. I bought
    a new, small-hole muzzle so that we could slowly get my horse used to the
    grass. The last time she was muzzled, she was able to wear one with a bigger
    hole. Eventually she got transitioned to that muzzle, but she was very
    not happy for the first few weeks. She stood in the corner pouting.

    Eventually she got over it . She's been transitioned to the bigger-hole
    muzzle so gets a little more grass.

    Is it true that there is less sugar in the grass overnight ? Because I sure
    would like to let my mare have the muzzle off overnight, they are on
    24/7 turnout now.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Sep. 29, 2009
    Posts
    2,576

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cindyg View Post
    You MEAN momma. Those poor little darlings muzzled up. You sure have *them* trained, instead of them having *you* trained.

    IME pouting happens and it takes time for the pouting to stop. Make sure you show them how to drink with the muzzle on. I gave mine salt and he got it figured out. I figured he thought, "I can pout and be very pitiful while she looks at me, but I ain't gonna die of thirst, I will drink while she doesn't look".



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