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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 7, 2012
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    119

    Default Can I leave boots on all night?

    After green bean knocked himself badly and caused an awful splint I cant help but worry about his legs being protected while turned out. Towards the end of rehab when he started to be turned out regularly for a few hours a day he was booted up and turned out and I felt really good about it. Now he is on 10-12 hours turn out nightly. Turned out right as the sun is going down and brought in normally around 7am ( bugs). Can I leave boots on that long? I use Woof boots that are not stretchy so they cant be put on too tight.. but I do worry about wrapping bow. He is a very leggy youngster that always finds a way to hurt himself. Any other suggestions? This is the only turn out schedule that will work at this time...
    Tinker Toy & Blue Bonnett



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
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    West Coast of Michigan
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    Default

    All things considered, I would not boot a horse (other than bell boots for a shoe puller) for turnout unless it was for a very short period of time and then only the lightest of boots.
    Click here before you buy.


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  3. #3
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    Mar. 28, 2002
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    East of Dog River
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    deltawave is right, no boots for turnout or for that long.
    Founder of the Dyslexic Clique. Dyslexics of the world - UNTIE!!

    Member: Incredible Invisbles


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  4. #4
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    May. 20, 2013
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    11

    Default

    When we get home from shows, the horses are already poulticed and wrapped with pillows and standing wraps, we go ahead and turn them out for the night with their legs wrapped and feet packed. But it's for that night alone.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
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    Round Hill, VA
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    I have a client that insists her horse goes out with 4 boots for turnout. This time of year that means he's in them 12-15 hours!!! It freaks me out and I would prefer not to do it...too many risks, not to mention the serious skin funk potential.

    Now, I do have to some times turn my horse out in boots over the cooler months, and when I switched him to night time a couple of months ago, I actually turned him out in his boots, then went out a couple of hours later and pulled them off. THAT worked well because he was able to bounce around and act like a fruitloop for awhile when he first went out, and I was able to pull the boots once he settled. This might work for you, especially if your guy is silly early on, then settles after awhile. (Obviously, someone has to be around to do it...my guy's pasture is beside my house, so I just slipped out after dinner!).



  6. #6
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    Mar. 7, 2012
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    Default

    He is turned out alone and in a grassy paddock... no mud so I'm not worried about funk getting underneath. He also isnt silly when turned out... rolls.. goes straight to hay for a few bites.. water.. then back to hay. He is surrounded by two other pastures with six horses so he feels like he is in a herd so isnt worried about being alone. I can count on one hand how many times i have seen skid marks or turned up grass in his paddock that indicates he had been galloping or turning fast.. not sure why or when. I just dont want him to hurt himself again. I wish there were some type of long term turn out wraps that were safe. Something with ventilation and non-stretch that wouldnt upset the tendon in the front...or the back. ugh.
    Tinker Toy & Blue Bonnett



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2012
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    71

    Default

    Another vote for no boots on during turnout. Too many risks and I can only imagine the skin issues that could arise should boots be worn for numerous hours.

    You say your horse is a leggy youngster- I know what it's like to own a young horse that comes in with bumps and scraps. Frustrating and a little nerve racking. But consider this: once while watching a jump lesson, the horse being ridden kept taking down rails. The trainer finally told the rider to take off the horse's boots and ride him right up to the jumps. Well she did, and after a couple more rails, that horse realized, "hey, this hurts!" and started to pick up his feet. Your youngster is learning where his feet are. Granted, it's not reassuring when he gave himself a splint, but my opinion is that if you were to keep him booted, he'll continue to be lazy. Some horses have conformation issues that causes overreaching, interfering etc. but if this isn't the case, let your horse be a horse and knock himself a few times and he'll learn to watch where he places his legs and hooves.


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  8. #8
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    Feb. 1, 2012
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WARDen View Post
    He is turned out alone and in a grassy paddock... no mud so I'm not worried about funk getting underneath.
    It's not necessarily the mud or other stuff getting underneath, its the humidity alone that could CAUSE skin funk under the boots (like a fungus, bacteria, scratches, etc).

    He also isnt silly when turned out... rolls.. goes straight to hay for a few bites.. water.. then back to hay. He is surrounded by two other pastures with six horses so he feels like he is in a herd so isnt worried about being alone. I can count on one hand how many times i have seen skid marks or turned up grass in his paddock that indicates he had been galloping or turning fast.. not sure why or when.
    Then why the need to worry about putting boots on him for protection? Your post above indicates that he doesn't do anything alarming in turnout.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."


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  9. #9
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    Jun. 23, 2006
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    Stoystown, PA
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    Default

    Another vote for no boots for turnout. In most cases they do more harm than good.
    Boyle Heights Kid 1998 16.1h OTTB Dark Bay Gelding
    Tinner's Way x Sculpture by Hail to Reason
    "Once you go off track, you never go back!"



  10. #10
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    Mar. 7, 2012
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    SuckerForHorses

    ... because in turn out was when he developed his first awful splint and I dont want to deal with another surgery. He doesnt have to be acting crazy to knock himself. He pulls his bell boots off in the crossties all the time just by stepping on his own feet. He is also really hard on his legs when rolling... just collapses his legs on each other and it makes me cringe. I can't keep him from being a horse, I know that, but I am curious as to how I can keep him safe from harming himself again.

    HorsePlay

    .... I wish I could do that with this guy but honestly by the time he would realize where his feet are or grew into them he will be retired with injuries and with both splint bones removed.
    Tinker Toy & Blue Bonnett



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2008
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    Default

    What about something like BOT quick wraps? They're not sturdy, and only about as protective as a polo, but its something. A bit more breathable than boots I'd imagine.

    I have an oldster who lives out 24/7 and benefits from BOT wraps on his legs in the cold arthritic months. He wears them 20hrs straight as he ambles around his paddock.

    They do get funky though just from general body heat and dampness, and that is in the colder months. I have never tried in hot humid months, might be too much now that I think on it.

    I have 3 pairs that I rotate through so each set gets to air out for 2 days before being called back into duty.

    They also wick ambient moisture, so dewy grass would have them soaked in no time.
    “I am sorry negativity, I have no time for you. I have far too many positive things to do.”



  12. #12
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    Jul. 19, 2003
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    Round Hill, VA
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuckerForHorses View Post
    It's not necessarily the mud or other stuff getting underneath, its the humidity alone that could CAUSE skin funk under the boots (like a fungus, bacteria, scratches, etc).


    Then why the need to worry about putting boots on him for protection? Your post above indicates that he doesn't do anything alarming in turnout.
    Honestly, I agree with all of this. If you had said he was a big dork and bounced around and acted like a maniac (Which my horse does! He caused a tendon injury by bashing into himself during hooliganism WHILE BEING LED TO THE FIELD), then I would understand. But, really, leaving boots on for more than a few hours just is a recipe for OTHER issues.

    Really, I've been involved with a lot of young, gangly, clumsy kids and they DO grow out of it. And (I'm sure I'll eat my words) the chances that he'll bash himself so hard to cause a surgery inducing splint are probably slim. Especially if he's quiet.

    Really, the BEST thing you can do for him is give him a safe environment to go in, give him a job (when he's ready, obviously) and let him learn where his body is. Keeping him bubble wrapped and sheltered isn't going to let that happen.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2007
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    CT
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    Default

    Ours go out in boots, but only for 3 hours at a time. That said, I personally would try it and see how he reacts. You will have to be vigilant about checking for irritation and skin funk, and immediately discontinue use if you find something. However, neoprene wouldn't be my choice. I like these: http://www.equilibriumproducts.com/l...allsport_boot/



  14. #14
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    Jan. 16, 2002
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    West Coast of Michigan
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    Default

    If his legs are protected all the time he may never learn to quit knocking himself.
    Click here before you buy.


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  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2002
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    525

    Default

    No boots for all the above reasons - it's too long of a time & too much can happen. I don't know of 1 manufacturer that would recommended their product under those circumstances. And what is the likelihood of a repeat injury? If he knocks himself that often, maybe you need to talk to your vet/farrier. I understand your concerns, but if you feel that strongly about the need for boots, then maybe he should only be going out for a few hours.



  16. #16
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    Jul. 24, 2006
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    Default

    I dislike the idea of a horse being in boots all of the time for a whole host of reasons.

    Not the least of which, as mentioned by deltawave, is the idea that he will "train" himself to be able to be even goofier in turnout because what used to hurt (and where he might typically draw the line in bashing himself) will now be protected. That sounds like the path to needing even more protective gear and eventually bubble wrap.

    I'd rather my young horses figure out that doing something hurts immediately and hopefully learn a lesson from it.

    I've had a lot of doofy young boys (I know mares can be goofy too, but I'm convinced that testosterone or some other male hormone is what makes boys of ALL species so reckless with their own bodies) and I know it can be terrifying to watch them act like idiots, but it's also something that you have to let them figure out.
    __________________________________
    Forever exiled in the NW.



  17. #17
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    Mar. 28, 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    If his legs are protected all the time he may never learn to quit knocking himself.
    100% agreement from me. We never boot a horse in training aside from bell boots so they learn where their feet are and that bad steps can hurt. Most quickly learn where their feet should go and never see a boot unless conformation dictates use at speed.

    Also, those boots build up a huge amount of heat, far higher than body temperature, heat that tendons are not meant to handle. Just stick a thermometer between the boot and leg if you don't believe me and make sure it is digital as the heat will blow the top off a regular glass tube.
    Founder of the Dyslexic Clique. Dyslexics of the world - UNTIE!!

    Member: Incredible Invisbles


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  18. #18
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    Jul. 19, 2003
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    I believe I read it in a Blythe Tait book, but he never turns horses out in boots (including his top level partners), because he WANTS them to learn where to put their feet. If that means a bang from time to time, so be it. I agree with this thought.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep. 29, 2009
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    No, you can not.

    Horse legs ain't meant for coverage for that long. Also dirt can get in and rub legs raw.

    Take them off.



  20. #20
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    May. 6, 2003
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    Oy. This makes me . This would not be my choice for my horse at all.

    When we get home from shows, the horses are already poulticed and wrapped with pillows and standing wraps, we go ahead and turn them out for the night with their legs wrapped and feet packed. But it's for that night alone.
    According to the Mayan calendar, the world will not end this week. Please plan your life accordingly.



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