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  1. #21
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    Show me a 4 year old human with osteoarthritis . . . [ . . . ] . . . my point exactly.
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  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    An 85 year old human with OA got there by a different path than did the young Thoroughbred, no? Bottom line: what applies to one species can only be BROADLY applied to another, with a large number of caveats.
    An 85 year old human who tears their ACL has the same OA pathogenesis as a 14 year old human who tears their ACL. It just the pathogenesis is accelerated because the 85 year old's body is less able to handle it (I'm co-author on the equivalent of this study performed in mice, I'd be happy to share the manuscript with you). It's not the disease that is different, the body's reaction to the disease is different.
    Give those same two individuals the flu. I bet Grandma has a harder time handling it than Junior. It's not because the flu virus is different, or the pathogenesis is different, it's because Grandma's body can't handle it as well as Junior's.

    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    Bottom line: what applies to one species can only be BROADLY applied to another, with a large number of caveats.
    I wholeheartedly disagree with this statement. Did you know that anything that is put into a human's body is tested in animals as the step before clinical trials? It's not like there's a big jump here, otherwise we'd make no advancements in medicine.

    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    Show me a 4 year old human with osteoarthritis . . . [ . . . ] . . . my point exactly.
    A study that found OA in 10 year olds (average age 18.5 years). Secondary to Perthes, which leads to abnormal loading on the joint and subsequent OA.
    I don't feel like going through 83 pages (20 results each page) to find one closer to 4 years of age. I found this result on Page 2.



  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by morganpony86 View Post
    An 85 year old human who tears their ACL has the same OA pathogenesis as a 14 year old human who tears their ACL. It just the pathogenesis is accelerated because the 85 year old's body is less able to handle it (I'm co-author on the equivalent of this study performed in mice, I'd be happy to share the manuscript with you). It's not the disease that is different, the body's reaction to the disease is different.
    Give those same two individuals the flu. I bet Grandma has a harder time handling it than Junior. It's not because the flu virus is different, or the pathogenesis is different, it's because Grandma's body can't handle it as well as Junior's.


    I appreciate the replies, but you are sort of making my point for me. We are not in disagreement. Osteoarthritis is a disorder with multiple triggers, and although the microscopic appearance may be the same, the individual's history, genetics, age, weight, other health conditions, etc. play a large role in how the disease progresses and expresses itself. This was my point. Dosing oral products is iffy enough--extrapolating widely between different species and individuals just isn't possible, especially when talking about absorption of oral supplements. The response to a product has more (IMO) to do with the evanescent, relapsing/remitting nature of osteoarthritis SYMPTOMS than with some random supplement being "effective". In other words, grandma's hip is going to hurt worse on some days than on others because that is the nature of arthritic pain. Her using a supplement from the grocery store isn't going to change that fact, although she may swear that when they ran out of the chocolate flavor and she was forced to use the vanilla it made all the difference in the world. (<---actual patient story I was told, not that long ago)

    I wholeheartedly disagree with this statement. Did you know that anything that is put into a human's body is tested in animals as the step before clinical trials? It's not like there's a big jump here, otherwise we'd make no advancements in medicine.
    You may disagree if you like. I'm not saying animal testing has no role or that there are not some similarities. But on the other hand . . . do you know why tylenol is not used in cats? Why grapes should not be eaten by dogs? Chocolate? Why ivermectin cannot be given to certain breeds of dogs? Why benzodiazepines are lousy horse sedatives? Different chemicals and substances have different actions in different species. Fact.
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  4. #24
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    Scientist types, got a question here.

    We're talking about the efficiency of oral supplements or medication, for that matter.

    We know that HA works as an injectable, as do many of the other anti-arthritis injectables. We also know, don't we, what chemical reactions take place in the digestive system and where and how the active ingredients are taken up by the rest of the body. We could probably test blood to see how much active ingredient actually makes into the blood stream, which would be the equivalent, wouldn't it?, of an injectable's method of working unless it was injected IA.

    Couldn't someone develop a computer model and plug in the variables to see (virtually) if an oral supplement even had a chance of working?

    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    I appreciate the replies, but you are sort of making my point for me. We are not in disagreement. Osteoarthritis is a disorder with multiple triggers, and although the microscopic appearance may be the same, the individual's history, genetics, age, weight, other health conditions, etc. play a large role in how the disease progresses and expresses itself. This was my point. Dosing oral products is iffy enough--extrapolating widely between different species and individuals just isn't possible, especially when talking about absorption of oral supplements. The response to a product has more (IMO) to do with the evanescent, relapsing/remitting nature of osteoarthritis SYMPTOMS than with some random supplement being "effective". In other words, grandma's hip is going to hurt worse on some days than on others because that is the nature of arthritic pain. Her using a supplement from the grocery store isn't going to change that fact, although she may swear that when they ran out of the chocolate flavor and she was forced to use the vanilla it made all the difference in the world. (<---actual patient story I was told, not that long ago)



    You may disagree if you like. I'm not saying animal testing has no role or that there are not some similarities. But on the other hand . . . do you know why tylenol is not used in cats? Why grapes should not be eaten by dogs? Chocolate? Why ivermectin cannot be given to certain breeds of dogs? Why benzodiazepines are lousy horse sedatives? Different chemicals and substances have different actions in different species. Fact.
    "I'm a lumberjack, and I'm okay."
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  5. #25
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    I guess I just misunderstood your wording, then:

    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    and the causes of arthritis in one species may not be even remotely the same as it is in another.
    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    An 85 year old human with arthritis of the hip may look the same under the microscope as a 2yo TB with early hock arthritis, but on a non-molecular level it is not the same disease.
    This is why I thought you were saying in all of these people and animals, it is not the same disease. Which was why I was arguing that it is the same disease. There are many different causes of the disease, but the disease itself is the same.
    If you're arguing about treating the symptoms of OA, then that's a whole different ballgame. Symptoms are far different than pathogenesis.


    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    I'm not saying animal testing has no role or that there are not some similarities. But on the other hand . . . do you know why tylenol is not used in cats? Why grapes should not be eaten by dogs? Chocolate? Why ivermectin cannot be given to certain breeds of dogs? Why benzodiazepines are lousy horse sedatives? Different chemicals and substances have different actions in different species. Fact.
    But this is true within the same species as well. Peanut butter can be consumed on a daily basis by one human, and kill another. It's the nature of biology and normal variation. We're all different.

    So should we say that what applies to one human can only be broadly applied to another, with a large number of caveats?? No.

    Sure, there are specific examples of where you cannot apply something across species, as you pointed out above, and that is well noted in research. But osteoarthritis is not one of these examples. That was the point I was trying to make.



  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    Show me a 4 year old human with osteoarthritis . . . [ . . . ] . . . my point exactly.
    Kid's story was in the local paper - she's maybe 7 now

    Sometimes you are just amazing ...



  7. #27
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    The odd peanut butter allergy is not an exception that proves the rule that peanuts are good sources of nutrition for humans. We don't feed cats vegetarian diets because we know CATS IN GENERAL don't thrive without at least some animal products. Trying to point out differences between species, not odd anomalies here. And the rare child with a rare form of joint disease (if the "local paper" is even accurate--not all arthritis is osteoarthritis) is not the exception that proves the rule that osteoarthritis IN HUMANS is generally a time-dependent, degenerative condition that has a lot to do with overuse, age, weight and anatomy. I still maintain that although under the microscope a young racehorse's knee arthritis may look similar to an elderly person's wrist arthritis, it is still not necessarily precisely the same disorder in that different factors had a role. Factors we almost certainly do not yet understand fully.

    A bruise from a hammer blow to the thigh is going to look the same under the microscope as a bruise on the sole of the foot from running barefoot on concrete.

    But I think this is straying far enough from the original topic that it is no longer worth belaboring. Suffice to say that I've been around long enough to never think that one size fits all. And this goes double and triple for the use of medications and/or supplements in one species and expecting it to be the same in others.

    As to computer modeling of drug absorption and distribution--probably it exists. There are actually studies on oral absorption of GAGs in multiple species, as well. But whether a given supplement manufacture is going to bother doing a study to show that their product does what it's supposed to do? Why would they bother? People buy it without any proof at all. Waste of money in their view.
    Last edited by deltawave; May. 22, 2013 at 02:16 PM.
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  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    And the rare child with a rare form of joint disease (if the "local paper" is even accurate--not all arthritis is osteoarthritis)
    As I said, amazing ... the "local paper" was not inaccurate.

    You said
    Show me a 4 year old human with osteoarthritis . . . [ . . . ] . . . my point exactly.
    as if it were some unprecedented phenomenon, mere conjecture for the sake of argument.





    And this goes double and triple for the use of medications and/or supplements in one species and expecting it to be the same in others.
    I'm not sure what you're arguing here, we use human drugs in horses all the time, use vaccine methodology which is efficacious in human,cats & dogs & only marginal in horses ...

    ETA: Forgot my favourite
    Horse & Human DNA are more homologous than Human & (closest) Primate DNA



  9. #29
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    Oy. Yes, we use some human drugs on animals. After they've been TESTED FOR SAFETY AND EFFICACY, for the most part. And there are many, many human drugs which are NOT used on horses, cats, dogs, etc. because we know THEY DO NOT WORK THE SAME BETWEEN SPECIES and are UNSAFE or INEFFECTIVE. Humans are not horses are not dogs are not cats are not pigs, although many biological systems work very much the same. Supplements can just be sold with no testing. They are not drugs with evidence behind them. The topic is nutraceutical hyaluronic acid in oral form. It is absorbed and utilized differently between species and this is not a matter of opinion on my part! Jeez.

    Their DNA may be very close to the same, but would you give your collie a nice big dose of ivermectin while you're deworming your horse or your other dogs? Some nice tylenol for your kitty who just had stitches and seems a little sore? A nice little bit of xanax for your old dog who's afraid of thunderstorms? Of course you wouldn't. Because we know these drugs, while perfectly fine in the proper dose in the proper species, are unsafe or may have unexpected effects for these individuals.

    One can find 4 year old humans with advanced atherosclerosis and all manner of other diseases. Doesn't remotely mean that a young horse and an old human have the same story to tell when it comes to their bodies and what's happened to them. One-in-a-million freak occurrences are not what I was referring to. Apparently, however, it is imperative to find a single example of something to disagree with every last thing I write. Not atypical, of course.
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  10. #30

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    Try a good green lip mussel extract, all GAGs are in it included HA, it is affordable and works. We use allinflex, see their facebook page, heaps of references. And from our own experience on 14 horses, I can not believe how good this product works. Or go www.allinflex.co.nz



  11. #31
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    Back to the topic...

    I did the injectable HA for a 12 year old Hunter with diagnosed arthritic changes in the hocks and OCD for several years. There was an obvious difference. At the suggestion of my vet, I tried the oral HA gels LubriSyn and Hyalauronix and observed similar benefits to the injectable. We were able to increase the time for hock injections from yearly to 16-18 months. We also were careful of footing and watched the workload.

    During that period, we experimented with switching to less pricey powders with disappointing results-as in they did nothing. Must have tried all of them that were available at the time, had to keep returning to the oral HA. When the horse hit about 17, had to go back to every 12 month hock injections, then every 6 months. Stopped the oral HA and returned to the Legend IV but noted little improvement. Stopped jumping the horse at 20, retired at 21 with unrelated injury.

    Anecdotal for sure but consistant to what friends experienced, observation within the large show and sales barn I boarded at for many years and what my vets were observing with those specific products on horses of similar age and background with known, diagnosed issues.

    So, for OP? Whether it works or not depends on the horse and what is actually wrong that is making them uncomfortable. But those few products that worked, the injectable and oral gel HAs, worked right away if they were going to and they did not work on all of them. If you are not seeing any improvement, use up what you have and move on.

    Cannot see any reason to use it as a preventative, they don't even offer human products as arthritis preventative. So many get it as we age, if something worked to avoid it it would be out there.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

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  12. #32
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    I have seen the use of the liquid form of HA used to good effect on a stable full of racehorses, many of them claimers, many of them with various and sundry joint issues. All of them were helped. It has to be given daily and squirted in the mouth, not put on the feed. This is the product we used.

    http://lubrisyn.com/equine/
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  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by lindawood036@gmail.com View Post
    Try a good green lip mussel extract, all GAGs are in it included HA, it is affordable and works. We use allinflex, see their facebook page, heaps of references. And from our own experience on 14 horses, I can not believe how good this product works. Or go www.allinflex.co.nz
    Reported
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  14. #34
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    I was syringing Flex-Force HA into my horse's mouth for a few months. Got tired of the sticky mess and now just squirt it onto his feed. Haven't noticed it being any less effective.



  15. #35
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    I had great results with lubrisyn over the years but it seemed like it was very sensitive to cold and would not be effective if it got cold. I could keep it at a suitable temp but had no control over the various places it was shipped before I got it. I stopped using it for that reason and switched to pentosan or legend.



  16. #36
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    This article today in the NY Times is sort of on point.
    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/0...=top-news&_r=0
    "I'm a lumberjack, and I'm okay."
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  17. #37
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    Pentosan was not available until the very end of the years I managed my aging horse. Anecdotally, it seems effective depending on what's going on with the horse. I would have used it. Horse, now 26 is on nothing except occaisionally Previcoxx
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.



  18. #38
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    This is a very old thread.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



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