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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2003
    Location
    NJ
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    1,521

    Default Show jumping question

    Horse that has a great jump but does not try when the jumps are straight forward. Combos, fillers, things to look at, feet to spare over it, as soon as the jump is "normal" rails fly...

    Horse is 6, starting his 3rd season of eventing, going training.

    Just to add he is sound, well cared for, no back, hock, etc issues.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 6, 2008
    Location
    Area II, the Blue Ridge Mountains
    Posts
    2,204

    Default

    School with solid, heavy poles. Sounds like he needs to feel some "sting."

    Also, make sure he is in front of your leg, and not just getting flat and lazy in sj. Sometimes we as riders are more complacent in sj and don't have the quality canter needed to get a good jump.

    I've had this problem with the smart Irish horses before.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 10, 2001
    Posts
    6,728

    Default

    Where is the horse hitting the rails? On the shin, hoof, knee,...? I had one that would not touch a XC fence but new exactly how high to lift his feet in stadium. Never hit with a shin etc., but his feet came out of the ring all sorts of new, pretty colors.

    That was something that could not be fixed. The horse was too smart. We tried "legal" (bamboo poling, gymnastics,...) and "illegal" (tack rails, heavy but thin steel poles blindly set at rail height,...) methods but none worked.

    There are some horses that are just too damn smart and know exactly how much effort that they want to put into something.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 25, 2012
    Location
    Blythewood, South Carolina
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    98

    Default

    One thing to think about before trying any of those poling methods is that you can cause your horse to start refusing. It's happened before, and they're extremely smart animals, smarter than us. ugh!
    Save The Date 08-15-2011



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2001
    Location
    Lexington, KY--GO BIG BLUE!!
    Posts
    3,346

    Default

    Time to move up?

    I do agree with ahbaumgardner. Make sure you have a good canter, and aren't just relying on his "sharpness" to get a good jump. No matter how good you think it is, the canter can always get better. Work with ground poles, series of canter rails, on angles, turns, circles, adding/leaving out strides, etc.
    “A clever person solves a problem. A wise person avoids it.”
    ? Albert Einstein

    ~AJ~



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 6, 2008
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    Area II, the Blue Ridge Mountains
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RAyers View Post
    Where is the horse hitting the rails? On the shin, hoof, knee,...? I had one that would not touch a XC fence but new exactly how high to lift his feet in stadium. Never hit with a shin etc., but his feet came out of the ring all sorts of new, pretty colors.

    That was something that could not be fixed. The horse was too smart. We tried y"legal" (bamboo poling, gymnastics,...) and "illegal" (tack rails, heavy but thin steel poles blindly set at rail height,...) methods but none worked.

    There are some horses that are just too damn smart and know exactly how much effort that they want to put into something.
    ^^^
    Yep. Had a very scoped Irish horse who was just that.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2000
    Location
    Nokesville, VA
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    35,432

    Default

    You just have to ride better to the fences he doesn't find imposing.
    Janet

    chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 30, 2002
    Location
    Looking up
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    6,318

    Default

    No ground lines.
    "Passion, though a bad regulator, is a powerful spring." -- Emerson
    www.eventhorse.wordpress.com



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2003
    Location
    NJ
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    Default

    Thank you everyone. His canter has gotten much stronger over the winter but you may be on to something there, getting it even better, steadier, lighter, etc. he is the first WB cross I've seriously ridden. I think I am so used to TB canters and go that I am also having to learn how to get the best out of this type of horse...I will amp up our canter work, poles adding taking out etc and see where that gets us.

    Janet - He in the past has wanted me to carry him to the fence in stadium which I have worked hard to teach him he has to do it on his own. Suggestions for "riding better" while teaching him to do it on his own? I am pretty sure if i got more involved I could probably get him to leave the rail in, speculating a little here...sending him into gymnastics he does very well with an auto release



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 6, 2008
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    Area II, the Blue Ridge Mountains
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by retreadeventer View Post
    No ground lines.
    Tell me more? Interesting....



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2000
    Location
    Nokesville, VA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DancingPretense View Post
    Janet - He in the past has wanted me to carry him to the fence in stadium which I have worked hard to teach him he has to do it on his own. Suggestions for "riding better" while teaching him to do it on his own? I am pretty sure if i got more involved I could probably get him to leave the rail in, speculating a little here...sending him into gymnastics he does very well with an auto release
    "Ride better" doesn't mean "interfere more", especially not in the last couple of strides.

    For instance, you mention working on the quality of the canter.

    "Riding better" means that, well before the "problem becuase it is plain" fence, you get the best canter you possibly can.

    Make sure you have the intended pace and rhythm.

    Make sure he is straight.

    Make sure he neither falls in, nor runs through the outside shoulder on the turn.

    If it is the second fence of a related distance, make sure he lands balanced from the previous fence.

    And so on.

    You "set him up" PERFECTLY before the fence, then let him "do it on his own" on the actual approach.


    - where, with a more "imposing" fence, you can probalby get away with a slightly less-than-perfect "set up".
    Janet

    chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).



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