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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 25, 2013
    Posts
    135

    Thumbs down Transitions, Transitions, Transitions!!!!!

    So, my horse was in H/J training for the last 6-9 months and has improved on a lot of things but I have noticed that my horses beautiful dressage transitions are very much lacking right now. He used to be great at them but they kind of suck right now..... I know that transitions in jumpers are way different and they don't care about the frame and everything that dressage riders care about. So, here is what my horse is doing.

    -From walk to halt, he likes to pull his head forward and open his mouth. It takes 3-4 strides to get a good halt.
    -From the trot to walk, he still tries to pull his head forward, but will also try and pull downwards and or be heavy in your hands. This makes the transitions very icky and it elongates the transition time. He also will start excessively chewing and opening his mouth when he is irritated.
    From canter to trot, the same exact thing happens.

    Any exercises you would recommend to help with this? Should I only be worrying on getting the transition and not about the head, neck, or hindquarters too much? I have been doing transitions on circles and straight lines but I'm not seeing much improvement yet.... Any ideas would be appreciated!


    Also, his teeth were floated about a month ago.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2006
    Posts
    9,398

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    Quote Originally Posted by PonyGirl15 View Post
    So, my horse was in H/J training for the last 6-9 months and has improved on a lot of things but I have noticed that my horses beautiful dressage transitions are very much lacking right now. He used to be great at them but they kind of suck right now..... I know that transitions in jumpers are way different and they don't care about the frame and everything that dressage riders care about. So, here is what my horse is doing.

    -From walk to halt, he likes to pull his head forward and open his mouth. It takes 3-4 strides to get a good halt.
    -From the trot to walk, he still tries to pull his head forward, but will also try and pull downwards and or be heavy in your hands. This makes the transitions very icky and it elongates the transition time. He also will start excessively chewing and opening his mouth when he is irritated.
    From canter to trot, the same exact thing happens.

    Any exercises you would recommend to help with this? Should I only be worrying on getting the transition and not about the head, neck, or hindquarters too much? I have been doing transitions on circles and straight lines but I'm not seeing much improvement yet.... Any ideas would be appreciated!


    Also, his teeth were floated about a month ago.
    Do whatever you did that got them good before he went to the hunter trainer.
    If it worked before, it will work again.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 23, 2010
    Location
    Lancashire UK, formerly Region 8
    Posts
    662

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    Do you have an effective half halt at all paces? If not, that's the place to start. Also, remember that your hands need to give slightly, even in a downward transition; be sure you are releasing the rein forward enough to allow the horse to move into the new gait. And, don't forget to use your seat!
    Proud COTH lurker since 2001.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 25, 2013
    Posts
    135

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    Quote Originally Posted by meupatdoes View Post
    Do whatever you did that got them good before he went to the hunter trainer.
    If it worked before, it will work again.
    I started him under saddle. I always just did a lot of repetition on transitions. Maybe I just need to be more patient. Its only been a month... I guess I was hoping people had some new exercises to help with giving him things to do so that he is always busy during the transitions.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    36,508

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    Quote Originally Posted by PonyGirl15 View Post
    I know that transitions in jumpers are way different
    GOOD Jumper (or Hunter) transitions are not remotely different from Dressage. Proper transitions are proper transitions, all the basics are the same

    and they don't care about the frame and everything that dressage riders care about.
    GOOD trainers do

    The only thing different is the outline of the horse as he progresses up the levels. The UL Dressage horse is going to look much different in his outline going from the walk to the canter, than is the Hunter.

    So, here is what my horse is doing.

    -From walk to halt, he likes to pull his head forward and open his mouth. It takes 3-4 strides to get a good halt.
    -From the trot to walk, he still tries to pull his head forward, but will also try and pull downwards and or be heavy in your hands. This makes the transitions very icky and it elongates the transition time. He also will start excessively chewing and opening his mouth when he is irritated.
    From canter to trot, the same exact thing happens.
    He's being pulled into the down gait, which is exactly backwards. That is not a Hunter or Jumper thing, that is poor riding/training.

    What happened in this 6 months to get him here? Were you doing most of the riding? Under what sort of instruction, ie, what words were being told to you?

    Any exercises you would recommend to help with this? Should I only be worrying on getting the transition and not about the head, neck, or hindquarters too much? I have been doing transitions on circles and straight lines but I'm not seeing much improvement yet.... Any ideas would be appreciated!
    Ride him forward into the transitions, back to front - that's how he got the "beautiful dressage transitions" he had, that's how ALL horses should move between and within gaits.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    11,514

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    Any jumper riders I've known that were in the "big League" knew their dressage, and were very capable of riding it. A good jumper cannot be ridden off the the hand. He needs the freedom of the head and neck to jump well.

    So go back to your basics, and expect him to come with you. If you need help from a dressage instructor, get it!
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 25, 2013
    Posts
    135

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    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    GOOD Jumper (or Hunter) transitions are not remotely different from Dressage. Proper transitions are proper transitions, all the basics are the same


    GOOD trainers do

    The only thing different is the outline of the horse as he progresses up the levels. The UL Dressage horse is going to look much different in his outline going from the walk to the canter, than is the Hunter.


    He's being pulled into the down gait, which is exactly backwards. That is not a Hunter or Jumper thing, that is poor riding/training.

    What happened in this 6 months to get him here? Were you doing most of the riding? Under what sort of instruction, ie, what words were being told to you?



    Ride him forward into the transitions, back to front - that's how he got the "beautiful dressage transitions" he had, that's how ALL horses should move between and within gaits.
    I was only riding him 1-2 a week in a jump lesson scenario. I agree with this. I think that he was being ridden by the assistant more than the actual trainer. Hence why I left.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    36,508

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    Glad you left Not only was the assistant not capable of riding him correctly, the head "trainer" obviously didn't choose assistants properly and did not supervise (at least) that one. As well, if the head "trainer" had actually been riding him, and knew these things were wrong, s/he would have worked on fixing them and talked to the asst about why it was happening.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 25, 2013
    Posts
    135

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    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    Glad you left Not only was the assistant not capable of riding him correctly, the head "trainer" obviously didn't choose assistants properly and did not supervise (at least) that one. As well, if the head "trainer" had actually been riding him, and knew these things were wrong, s/he would have worked on fixing them and talked to the asst about why it was happening.
    I know. Its not that he doesn't transition. Its just that he is now very grumpy about it. He changes his stride length at the w,t,c are great but the transitions just really suck. This will be my daily project. o well. Live and learn!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    36,508

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    Something else to consider - make sure in all that 6 months of work that he didn't outgrow his saddle. A too-tight saddle can make it painful to engage the back and transition properly
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET


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