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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov. 28, 2000
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
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    10,414

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    Quote Originally Posted by ahf View Post
    I am very proud of the stallion I bred, just as I am proud of all the other Hanoverian breeders whose shoulders I stood on to produce him. It took a village.

    I am just as proud of his accomplishments after he was sold. I didn't get into sporthorse breeding to produce pasture ornaments, and seeing products of my program out there and performing is a huge relief, and quite honestly it is solace that all the heartbreak and years of work weren't for naught.
    I understand and empathise with this statement completely.
    I would be proud beyond belief to have a colt from my small breeding program in someone else's good program. Out performing, yes - because that is what every single one of them was bred to do - but if he were also a quality stallion?
    I would be beyond happy.
    As breeders, and in particular as a stallion owner, I hope to leave some small legacy of sane, sound, beautiful athletes - for the same reasons as ahf - for the solace in knowing that the years of hard work, faith in the future, belief in what you are doing, missed vacations, torn rotater cuffs, and broken hearts - were somehow 'worth it' in the end.
    At this point, AFR has no stallion sons. There have been exceptional colts, but I have gelded everything.
    Now, in retrospect, of course, I question that decision.

    There were colts owned by others who were being kept intact.
    One of them died last year, very sadly.
    The owners of the others realized they didn't really want to stand a stallion, and gelded them.
    Which I understand and support - it does take a special commitment to produce and develop a stallion.

    At this point, at least, any small legacy I might have will be through the AFR daughters, and the daughters of his sisters.
    It is my sincerest and deepest hope that in time, they will all go to wonderful breeding programs and be bred to outstanding horses, to keep the bloodlines alive and performing.
    A FINE ROMANCE - JC Reg Thoroughbred - GOLD Premium CSHA - ISR/OLDNA Approved
    CSHA Brickenden Stallion Award Winner - for Performance offspring.
    Please visit A Fine Romance on FB!


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  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan. 24, 2000
    Location
    Bath, PA, USA
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    466

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    I understand, Fred, but all breeders need excellent mares! It would not be a small legacy at all if A Fine Romance became a name breeders sought in the dam line of a pedigree!
    "Horsemanship is not merely a matter of bodily skills, but is based on scholarship and, therefore, is a matter of the mind and intellect." Charles de Kunffy

    http://www.equiimages.com


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  3. #23
    Join Date
    Nov. 28, 2000
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
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    Quote Originally Posted by SueL View Post
    I understand, Fred, but all breeders need excellent mares! It would not be a small legacy at all if A Fine Romance became a name breeders sought in the dam line of a pedigree!
    Thank you very much SueL.
    I hope that will be the case.
    A FINE ROMANCE - JC Reg Thoroughbred - GOLD Premium CSHA - ISR/OLDNA Approved
    CSHA Brickenden Stallion Award Winner - for Performance offspring.
    Please visit A Fine Romance on FB!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2001
    Location
    Catharpin, Virginia
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    6,671

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    Quote Originally Posted by DownYonder View Post
    I wonder if you and I are thinking about the same person - LOL!

    OTOH, lots of people think their cute colts are stallion prospects - warmbloods for sale has 25 ads containing the words "stallion prospect" - including one for a 1/2 Friesian, 1/4 Hanoverian, 1/8 Arabian, and 1/8 Saddlebred colt (but he is a pinto, so of course he is a stallion prospect!); several other ads for colts who are apparently considered stallion prospects because they are "homozygous pintos"; another ad with multiple misspellings of the name of the well known WB sire; and several ads for colts sired by WB stallions out of ISH mares (I didn't think any registry approved stallions from that type of cross - or does ISH?).

    As for "when the inspector says it is" - I know of several examples where the breeder asked the inspector, "Do you think he could be a stallion prospect?", and the inspector shrugged and say, "Well, maybe." And next thing you know, said breeder is advertising the colt as a genuine stallion prospect, and telling people the inspectors said it was. Uh, since when did "maybe" mean the same thing as "definitely!"?

    In the cases I experienced, the owner did not approach the inspection jury...the inspectors approached the colt owner to "suggest" they might want to keep intact, watch and return to the registry for reinspection.

    BIG difference between the owner of a cute colt approaching inspectors, who may just may being "diplomatic".



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Sep. 4, 2007
    Location
    Crossville, TN
    Posts
    1,123

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    Really interesting question I think. A few weeks ago I paid the prenomination fee to the ATA for my yearling colt. I did this because he scored very well at his foal inspection, he scored well with very positive comments at the DSHB shows, and people whose opinions I value have said that he might have what it takes. To that end I am about to take him to a great place to spend the next few months until we sell our current farm (NOT set up for a young colt) and move to a farm that I will properly set up for a colt/stallion.

    So we'll see, but I am very aware of the ego that can sometimes go along with owning a stallion and the barn blindness that can occur with any horse owner. I am trying to be as grounded and realistic about my boy as possible.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct. 20, 2008
    Location
    Sunshine State
    Posts
    2,215

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    We're gelding ours this winter. We'd do it now but our vet says it might add height and he should already mature plenty tall. With our set-up a colt could only be a stallion prospect if he was going to live with someone else.
    The rebel in the grey shirt



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct. 4, 2003
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    7,405

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    A different point of view ...

    We raise many stallion prospects and have produced 5 licensed stallions to date. For us, it is not about ego. It is about moving breeding forward. If someone doesn't raise stallion prospects, than we will be 10 to 20 years behind the curve. Someone has to do it.

    I know immediately if a colt is a stallion prospect. It is a bit easier as all of our jumper breds have been bred to have international sport potential, so pedigree is a given. I can see the presence, carriage, quality of conformation, etc. at birth. Correctness, gaits, character, and sport potential take a bit longer to gauge. The final judgement is on going and sometimes we do not completely decide until the colt is 3 or 4 years old. Sometimes, he is still suitable to be a stallion, but maybe not suitable for our program. Not every colt matures as we hope or has the character / rideability that we breed for.

    In regards to others raising stallion prospects, the advice I offer is to only do it if you have the resources to do it right and that you are going through the process with a horse worthy of being a stallion. It isn't always easy to house a stallion and can be even harder finding a good trainer willing to take a stallion on. The emotion needs to be totally taken out of the decision making process.
    Silver Creek Farms - home of Apiro & Validation
    Visit us on facebook!


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  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2004
    Location
    Virginia. We Do Ponies!
    Posts
    11,821

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    ^^^THIS^^^
    Randee Beckman ~Otteridge Farm, LLC (http://on.fb.me/1iJEqvR)~ Marketing Manager - The Clothes Horse & Jennifer Oliver, Equine Insurance Specialist


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2007
    Posts
    101

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    Quote Originally Posted by DownYonder View Post
    25 ads containing the words "stallion prospect" - including one for a 1/2 Friesian, 1/4 Hanoverian, 1/8 Arabian, and 1/8 Saddlebred colt (but he is a pinto, so of course he is a stallion prospect!)
    ROFL. Sad but true. "Stallion prospect" is becoming as misunderstood as "FEI prospect" sometimes.

    I'd consider the source. Some people are fools or egomaniacs, but Silver Creek makes a point too, we need good breeders producing stallion prospects. I look at who's claiming to have a stallion prospect. There are some breeders if they say they've got a stallion prospect, I know they've got a stallion prospect. These are reputable breeders associated with legit registries and I can trust they know what they're talking about.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2001
    Location
    Catharpin, Virginia
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    6,671

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    Quote Originally Posted by showjumpers66 View Post
    In regards to others raising stallion prospects, the advice I offer is to only do it if you have the resources to do it right and that you are going through the process with a horse worthy of being a stallion. It isn't always easy to house a stallion and can be even harder finding a good trainer willing to take a stallion on. The emotion needs to be totally taken out of the decision making process.
    Exactly. Very cogent points when it comes to the "reality" of raising and standing a stallion. This is one of the biggest "bottom lines".


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  11. #31
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2012
    Location
    In the wrong place!
    Posts
    107

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    Totally agreed with showjumper66, donatella and sid!!


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  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jan. 2, 2009
    Posts
    410

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    Easy question...If it is on Creig's List and still has it's equipment it is a "stallion" prospect!


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  13. #33
    Join Date
    Oct. 17, 2011
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    40

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    [QUOTE=showjumpers66;6991724]A different point of view ...

    I like your answer, showjumper66. As a first time breeder, it has crossed my mind what to do with any colts I have.
    PMS: Pissed-off Mare Syndrome
    _______________________________________________
    http://marshallfarms.ca/
    http://www.facebook.com/marshallfarms.ca



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Dec. 11, 2005
    Location
    Castle Rock, CO
    Posts
    2,818

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    Quote Originally Posted by showjumpers66 View Post
    A different point of view ...

    We raise many stallion prospects and have produced 5 licensed stallions to date. For us, it is not about ego. It is about moving breeding forward. If someone doesn't raise stallion prospects, than we will be 10 to 20 years behind the curve. Someone has to do it.

    I know immediately if a colt is a stallion prospect. It is a bit easier as all of our jumper breds have been bred to have international sport potential, so pedigree is a given. I can see the presence, carriage, quality of conformation, etc. at birth. Correctness, gaits, character, and sport potential take a bit longer to gauge. The final judgement is on going and sometimes we do not completely decide until the colt is 3 or 4 years old. Sometimes, he is still suitable to be a stallion, but maybe not suitable for our program. Not every colt matures as we hope or has the character / rideability that we breed for.

    In regards to others raising stallion prospects, the advice I offer is to only do it if you have the resources to do it right and that you are going through the process with a horse worthy of being a stallion. It isn't always easy to house a stallion and can be even harder finding a good trainer willing to take a stallion on. The emotion needs to be totally taken out of the decision making process.
    Agree 100%!
    Hickstead 1996-2011 Godspeed
    " Hickstead is simply the best and He lives forever in our hearts"
    Akasha 1992-2012 - I will always love you sweet girl.



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2005
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    12,428

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fred View Post
    At this point, at least, any small legacy I might have will be through the AFR daughters, and the daughters of his sisters.
    It is my sincerest and deepest hope that in time, they will all go to wonderful breeding programs and be bred to outstanding horses, to keep the bloodlines alive and performing.

    And that is a great legacy. A friend of mine had a small breeding operations but produced lovely horses (and very competitive ones), including one she kept as a stallion for many years. She gelded her stallion and he is living out his days as a nice gelding. But I have one of his daughters who has now produced two lovely daughters....and so a bit of her program lives on in mine....and will likely live on in others.
    ** The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits. -- Albert Einstein **


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