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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2010
    Location
    Bay Area, CA
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    195

    Default Legs body legs

    I ride H/J.. my horse is jumped 3-4 days a week. He is super fit but I want to protect his legs/body the best that I can.

    Obviously I ride him in front and back boots for protection and well fitted tack

    He gets the Smartcombo supplement. (contains Glucosamine, MSM, Vitamin C, Biotin, Amino Acids, Omega 3 Fatty Acids, Probiotics, Prebiotics, Digestive Enzymes)

    I also do a Vetrolin Liniment all over his body about once a week. (http://www.smartpakequine.com/vetrol...x?cm_vc=Search)

    I notice that eventers tend to wrap their horses legs a lot after workouts/hard rides/shows.

    Does anyone have any advice/recommendations for anything I can do or should be doing for Henry after our rides?

    I want to make sure that I am tending to him the best that I can!

    Thanks!
    ::Karley::

    Henry (House of Fortuny) 7 yr old OTTB
    http://dondeestahenry.blogspot.com/



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 20, 2013
    Location
    Kansas City
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    746

    Default

    This is a great question! I too have wondered about boots and wraps to decrease the concussion of work. My mare is 8 and just starting on Smartcombo ultra so I know about that supplement. I will be interested in the experts responses.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
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    Default

    The use of boots/wraps does not go into the "obviously" category for me personally. If they need it for protection from bangs or bumps, sure. But that isn't going to help tendons or ligaments at all.

    I'm an eventer, and only wrap my white horse's legs to keep them CLEAN. I do ice, however, after XC and that (IMO) is very beneficial, with minimal to no down side other than a very small amount of work. I do not use poultice or liniments, having come to the conclusion after a lot of very scientific thinking about what they actually do that they do . . . virtually nothing. I feel the same about 99% of supplements. I do feed flax seeds and have no beef with appropriate vitamins/minerals. Everything else, IMO, is a bunch of fluff.

    My best advice for maintaining soundness? Keep the animal FIT, in ideal weight with the best nutrition choices available, invest as much as you possibly can in the best hoof care you can get, avoid bad footing like the plague, warmup and cool down appropriately, keep gratuitous pounding to a minimum, and turn the animal out as much as you possibly can. All of which adds almost NOTHING to the monthly horse bill, by the way.
    Click here before you buy.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2010
    Location
    Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    195

    Default

    Thanks for your 2 cents Deltawave

    Sounds like I'm already doing what you recommend (sans the ice)... just wanted to see what others thought
    ::Karley::

    Henry (House of Fortuny) 7 yr old OTTB
    http://dondeestahenry.blogspot.com/



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,220

    Default

    What is involved in these 3-4 days per week jumping?
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET


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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2010
    Location
    Bay Area, CA
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    195

    Default

    You mean height? 2'9" to 3' for most of the jumping- occasionally up to 3'6" for the one trainer ride a week.
    ::Karley::

    Henry (House of Fortuny) 7 yr old OTTB
    http://dondeestahenry.blogspot.com/



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul. 10, 2003
    Location
    Michigan, USA
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    Default

    The best way to keep a horse sound and jumping as long as possible is use their jumps prudently. There are only so many jumps in every horse; don't waste them. On a fairly "finished" horse I usually really jump school once a week, and not max effort at that.
    Good footing, good farriery, good riding, and rest when needed. Things like supplements and injectables will never replace good horsemanship.
    *CrowneDragon*
    As Peter, Paul, and Mary say, a dragon lives forever.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
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    Greensboro, NC
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    I know you didn't ask this, but IMHO, that's too much jumping on too many days.

    protecting the legs/body the best you can is to do the least amount of work necessary. There are only so many jumps in a horse - keep them to a minimum so you have more years to enjoy them
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET


    5 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 6, 2003
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    1,888

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    I know you didn't ask this, but IMHO, that's too much jumping on too many days.

    protecting the legs/body the best you can is to do the least amount of work necessary. There are only so many jumps in a horse - keep them to a minimum so you have more years to enjoy them

    Yes, what JB and Crowne Dragon said. That's an awful lot of jumping.

    When my horse got to the "knows what he's doing" stage he was jumped maybe twice a month. Everything else was flatwork. We did a lot of cavaletti and ground poles as well.
    According to the Mayan calendar, the world will not end this week. Please plan your life accordingly.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 29, 2009
    Posts
    2,576

    Default

    I do not think the vetrolin does a thing for the horse.
    I did a one rat test on my husband on his very sore knee. He said it smelled good, but didn't do anything at all. Smelled good.

    Yes, keep your horse fit. And pretty much what Delta Wave has said.

    Ice is your friend. Get ice boots, ice the legs or any part of the body you need to.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr. 20, 2013
    Location
    Kansas City
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    Default

    So would you all ice the legs after every jumping session?



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 28, 2002
    Location
    East of Dog River
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    Default

    I'm in the good conditioning camp and that doesn't mean jumping a 3-4 times a week, that means getting miles and miles on the horse, mostly at a trot but using all gaits. Unless the horse interferes, ditch the boots because they cause a huge buildup of heat which is not good for the tendon and ligaments; if you don't believe me about heat buildup, pull the boots off immediately after work and you will understand. Bath the horse with what you will, but plain tepid water after every ride (the beastie should be sweating with every ride for conditioning) works very well but if you want him to smell like mint, whatever you wish.

    Linaments CAN do good if used as a lubricating medium for massage provided they contain nothing that will cause scald with long rubbing. Things like Green Cool will give you up to 15 minutes of rubbing per leg before it dries out but plain water also works but does dry more quickly; always rub WITH the hair growth when doing legs, never against. I rarely used mud/poultice unless a horse had a fresh knock on a leg and said knock wasn't accompanied by a skin break or abrasion. A daily routine of ice and massage do wonders for legs. Wrapping should be completely unnecessary unless there is an obvious problem.

    As to feed, give him what he needs, which will be salt, and supplements that are adjunct to what he eats, no need to piss away money on, for example, calcium and protein if the horse gets good quality alfalfa. If you are feeding whole oats as part of the hard feed, quit spending money on biotin and if you feed oil or oil seeds (flax, sunflower seeds) you can dispense with the omega three stuff as well. The joint supplements work for horses like for people - work on some quite well, and on others, not at all.
    Founder of the Dyslexic Clique. Dyslexics of the world - UNTIE!!

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  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
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    West Coast of Michigan
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    If icing is a hassle, cold hosing is simple and effective to cool the legs as well. If the majority of the horse's life is going to be jumping and it has to do that 3-4x per week (wow, that's a lot) then yes, I would cool the legs after each jumping session. FWIW, my eventers jump once a week at the most. Virtually everything I need to do with them to be successful jumping is done in my dressage saddle.
    Click here before you buy.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2012
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    71

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    If icing is a hassle, cold hosing is simple and effective to cool the legs as well. If the majority of the horse's life is going to be jumping and it has to do that 3-4x per week (wow, that's a lot) then yes, I would cool the legs after each jumping session. FWIW, my eventers jump once a week at the most. Virtually everything I need to do with them to be successful jumping is done in my dressage saddle.
    Exactly this.

    I agree that jumping 3-4 times a week is an awful lot, especially at those heights. Granted, your horse can obviously take the stress now, because you're jumping so often and your horse is still sound. But remember that a horse has a limited amount of jumps in him.

    I event and I only jump my mare once a week MAX. And most of the time, those jumps aren't even maxed out height wise, but they are small jumps set up in grids. My horse knows how to jump high, so I focus on getting her to jump correct. And after jump day, she gets her relaxing hack day. And I always, always cold hose legs after a rigorous workout.

    As for his body, because you jump your horse so much, I would consider looking into having a massage therapist work on your guy every now and then. I'm sure he'd love it (and it's a nice present for your horse's Birthday, Christmas, ect. =P)



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
    Location
    Middleburg, VA
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    12,468

    Default

    A lot of what I would say has already been said.

    Good fitness, smart riding, good warm up and cool down, a good farrier, a good vet, good feed (start with a forage based diet and only add a hard feed as needed), and liberal use of a curry comb. Ice or cold hose after a hard ride/big jump/whenever. Good horsemanship is actually pretty simple (Which is why I'm always baffled that so many seem to not get it).

    I am an eventer and only wrap my horse if he's standing around in a stall or trailer for more than an couple of hours after a hard day (ie, xc day at an event or a gallop day at home).



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2010
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    2,242

    Default

    If you need to jump that often I would jump the set courses at half height. You can still work on pace, rhythm, and distances at 2 feet and it puts less wear and tear on the legs. Honestly I think that is the best thing you can be doing for the legs. Prevent the damage rather than try and compensate later.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug. 7, 2005
    Location
    Georgia
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by loshad View Post
    Yes, what JB and Crowne Dragon said. That's an awful lot of jumping.

    When my horse got to the "knows what he's doing" stage he was jumped maybe twice a month. Everything else was flatwork. We did a lot of cavaletti and ground poles as well.
    Going to add my "too much jumping".
    Shouldn't be necessary and will be harmful.
    You know why cowboys don't like Appaloosas?" - Answer: Because to train a horse, you have to be smarter than it is.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun. 18, 2006
    Location
    New England
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    If you have not already done so, get some xrays of the front feet for shoeing purposes and to make sure there isn't anything funky going on that could be a red flag for future issues (like navicular bone spurs). Invest in the best farrier you can find (meaning one who is very particular about things like making sure angles are correct and hoof is as healthy as can be). Wish I had done this years ago before problems started!
    "And I saw heaven opened, and behold a white horse..." ~Revelation 19:11



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug. 3, 2010
    Location
    for now, Ohio
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    I agree with most of what's posted above.

    - too much jumping unless those days are just 2-4 fences worked into a mostly-flatwork school (some horses do better with a few jumps frequently, vs more jumps one day a week)
    - Cold Hosing is great
    - I'm a fan of standing wraps and poultice after a particularly hard work out. Especially in a show situation where my horse will be confined to a stall afterwards (I'd rather turnout and let them walk around for several hours after strenuous effort).
    - Some horses need hoof packing to keep their general comfort and soundness after a lot of jumping
    - I do like supplements (I use Smartflex 4 on the AO horse and 2 on my greenie) and joint maintenance as required (hock injections, etc)
    - Regular Chiro appts can do wonders for long-term soundness
    - And of course, the obvious components: fitness, good farrier work, properly fitting tack, etc

    there's also the "dumb luck" component of soundess. Some horses are still jumping Grand Prix at 17. Some are lame at 10. Depends on genetics, conformation, injuries, care/mx over their lifetimes. etc. Most of these are outside your span of control, but the more you know, the more you can develop a routine to minimize the risks to your horse.
    A good man can make you feel sexy, strong, and able to take on the world.... oh, sorry.... that's wine...wine does that...



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2010
    Location
    Bay Area, CA
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    195

    Default

    Thanks for all the advice!

    I ride with an amazing trainer and believe 100% in what she had us doing, otherwise I wouldn't be with her haha! I understand that not everyone is on the same train as we are when it comes to jumping but we aren't doing course after course after course- we are working on a line, a combination or something specific... we aren't jumping a million times or in excess- some weeks we are only jumping 2 ft other weeks it's 3 ft. My horse is in training and like I said, I do what my trainer says- if I didn't feel it was right we wouldn't be doing it

    X-rays of his feet have been taken, he is on good feed and supplements to compliment his feed, have a great farrier, hosed off after rides (weather permitting), lots of grooming, utd with the vet and Chiropractor...

    Looks like I might add icing his legs after particularly hard rides.

    Thanks again!
    ::Karley::

    Henry (House of Fortuny) 7 yr old OTTB
    http://dondeestahenry.blogspot.com/



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