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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Apr. 19, 2011
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    Madison, GA
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    Another vote over here for Dobies and Heelers. DH and I had 5 dogs and the Aussies were absolutely no good as guard dogs. They love(d) everyone.

    I thought my Heeler/Aussie cross loved everyone until a shady character came around the barn one night and she would not let him out of the car. She's great with all kids and can definitely tell a person who is up to no good from just one of our guests.

    Our Doberman is the ultimate family dog. All our guests and their children love him. I have seen little kids just laying around in the grass with him. If I had to leave a child with any of my dogs it would be him and my only fear is that he may accidentally sit on them. DH got a call one day that we had a hunter on our land illegally hunting so he took the Gator out there and the Dobie followed. Our Dobie ended up finding the guy before DH and had him pinned up to a tree by the time DH got there. He didn't bite him, just got really low and backed the guy up to the tree and stood in front of him till DH called him off. We were bewildered because we had never seen him so much as bark at anyone, let alone growl. He listened though and as soon as DH got there he backed off.

    FWIW the Dobie is also a fan of dress up: https://www.facebook.com/Megannigan?...type=3&theater
    Southern Cross Guest Ranch
    An All Inclusive Guest Ranch Vacation - Georgia
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    RIP Bocephus March 2008 - April 2013


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov. 24, 2006
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    1,125

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    If you're protecting family, I believe you want a big,black dog- visual intimidation takes care of more than half of criminals with ill intent I'd bet. If someone is scoping a house and sees a medium sized heeler cross at one place and a big,black Shep/Dob/Rott at the other- they'll be hitting up the heeler's house first. Now, the heeler may take care of the issue- but the big,black dog already took care of his issue just by the way he looks. When it comes to choosing that big,black dog- I'm all for a GSD especially if you already have experience with Malinois. You'd be getting a less intense, bigger,somewhat similar dog which seems to be what you're looking for? My GSD is the perfect dog for us, he can go anywhere and he will listen. He likes people, he's not going to bound over and lick a stranger to death, he's going to stand in front of us and watch and wait....then when he sees all is ok, he will go to be petted then come back to his family. He sees my nephew (2 years old) maybe twice a month and there are no strangers who would be allowed near him, yet he plays great with him. I have no doubt you would need to kill him to get to my daughter or myself, yet he's offleash with us everywhere we go-he listens wonderfully. I put a TON of time in him as a pup. To getwhat you want, I would clarify that- socialize like crazy, every second of his puppyhood I think I directed lol. He knows hand signals for every command, can drop him by pumping your fist, stop him by holding up your hand, so smart! Which could backfire if the time's not spent training I'm sure. Love him to death, he's our perfect family/farm dog.
    http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b2...pse09a98cd.jpg
    Video of him doing a few of his hand signals, tough to do the hand signals and video with your phone lol-
    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v...type=2&theater
    Kerri


    3 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2012
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    Vermont
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    I have a cattle dog, and I'm certain nobody would leave without at least bloodshed if they broke into our house or were intimidating to me in any way, he isn't good with other people's kids

    [Clarification here: I don't have children, but some friends do have 2 girls, and they have been around a lot since my ACD was a pup...he is good with them, but is not allowed around other children because he will snap at children who get in his space. These two girls know to just leave him alone, but he doesn't chase them or be obnoxious to them, and they can interact with him and he is fine].

    If you have other people's kids going in and out a lot, I wouldn't recommend a heeler for that environment. They really are dogs who have "their people" and then there's everybody else who are not "their people"
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2012
    Location
    Fern Creek, KY
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    3,010

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    Quote Originally Posted by Canaqua View Post
    We have one of those too (JRT X ACD) and she is exactly the same. Best dog I've ever had, but a serious handful, training-wise and very opinionated . She's 16 now and quite arthritic. I never worried at all, when she was younger and my husband was travelling extensively for work and I was alone in the house with baby and 10 year old. She'd been "put to the test" too...let's just say that NO ONE would get in this house around her, unless they had a gun and were willing to shoot her, and able to kill or disable her on the first shot, to get near any of us, yet, she's very tolerant of family members, including kids.
    How big is she, if you don't mind me asking? Our Dixie clocks in at about 26lbs and stands maybe calf height. The only thing I can't seem to 'turn off' is her bark. I don't mind that she alerts, but she'll keep alerting until whatever it is is out of sight. I really didn't think anything of her as a "protector" until we had somebody break into our bedroom and she sent him to the hospital with stitches.

    And Re: Great Danes, I used to work for a big AQHA barn, and the barn owner had a big Dane that she didn't tell me about. When I walked into the barn on my first day, there she was. Just standing in the aisle staring at me. Didn't growl or bark, just stood up straight and looked me right in the eyes. I locked myself in a stall, called the BO, and said "Lucifer is standing in the barn aisle waiting to take me. I swear I'm not a bad person!" She laughed, said it was just Daisy, and to give her a cookie out of the jar. She was a doll after that! I've never been more wary of a dog in my life!
    Quote Originally Posted by MistyBlue View Post
    I prefer them outside playing as opposed to standing in the barn aisle playing "I can crap more than you"
    New Year, New Blog... follow Willow and I here.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Apr. 19, 2011
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    Madison, GA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Superminion View Post
    How big is she, if you don't mind me asking? Our Dixie clocks in at about 26lbs and stands maybe calf height. The only thing I can't seem to 'turn off' is her bark. I don't mind that she alerts, but she'll keep alerting until whatever it is is out of sight. I really didn't think anything of her as a "protector" until we had somebody break into our bedroom and she sent him to the hospital with stitches.

    And Re: Great Danes, I used to work for a big AQHA barn, and the barn owner had a big Dane that she didn't tell me about. When I walked into the barn on my first day, there she was. Just standing in the aisle staring at me. Didn't growl or bark, just stood up straight and looked me right in the eyes. I locked myself in a stall, called the BO, and said "Lucifer is standing in the barn aisle waiting to take me. I swear I'm not a bad person!" She laughed, said it was just Daisy, and to give her a cookie out of the jar. She was a doll after that! I've never been more wary of a dog in my life!
    LOL I had a similar experience with a really big black chow. It came running and barking at me and I was convinced it was a bear! I then realized bears don't bark and the owner called the dog off and all was okay
    Southern Cross Guest Ranch
    An All Inclusive Guest Ranch Vacation - Georgia
    www.southcross.com
    RIP Bocephus March 2008 - April 2013


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
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    Feb. 1, 2012
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    Vermont
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    Quote Originally Posted by Superminion View Post
    And Re: Great Danes, I used to work for a big AQHA barn, and the barn owner had a big Dane that she didn't tell me about. When I walked into the barn on my first day, there she was. Just standing in the aisle staring at me. Didn't growl or bark, just stood up straight and looked me right in the eyes. I locked myself in a stall, called the BO, and said "Lucifer is standing in the barn aisle waiting to take me. I swear I'm not a bad person!" She laughed, said it was just Daisy, and to give her a cookie out of the jar. She was a doll after that! I've never been more wary of a dog in my life!
    I agree with you here! A friend had TWO of them, brothers...there is no way I would've ever gone into her house without them home, and sometimes even when they were home, one of the dogs still was very protective.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2012
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    282

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    Quote Originally Posted by Superminion View Post
    How big is she, if you don't mind me asking? Our Dixie clocks in at about 26lbs and stands maybe calf height. The only thing I can't seem to 'turn off' is her bark. I don't mind that she alerts, but she'll keep alerting until whatever it is is out of sight. I really didn't think anything of her as a "protector" until we had somebody break into our bedroom and she sent him to the hospital with stitches.

    And Re: Great Danes, I used to work for a big AQHA barn, and the barn owner had a big Dane that she didn't tell me about. When I walked into the barn on my first day, there she was. Just standing in the aisle staring at me. Didn't growl or bark, just stood up straight and looked me right in the eyes. I locked myself in a stall, called the BO, and said "Lucifer is standing in the barn aisle waiting to take me. I swear I'm not a bad person!" She laughed, said it was just Daisy, and to give her a cookie out of the jar. She was a doll after that! I've never been more wary of a dog in my life!
    LOL, I had that happen at a new boarding barn too! Big black Dane came barking and bounding towards me, I ran back into my car.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jul. 8, 2007
    Location
    Maryland
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    1,313

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    I would vote against a Border Collie. I have one and while he is a wonderful dog they are just too motion sensitive to be good around children. No matter how well you train them if they get into a frenzy they still have that instinct to go for an ankle nip. they tend to not have the kind of patience you see in the larger calmer breeds.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jul. 13, 2008
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    I suspect that more kids get bitten - and yes, really bitten, not nipped - and mauled by dogs every year than get snatched by strangers, or abused by non-family in a situation where the family dog would be around to protect them. So why get a protection/guard breed to protect the kids? It's like getting a mammoth SUV to protect your children, despite the fact that your larger, heavier vehicle is now an increased menace to every child traveling in a car.

    Personally, my childhood pet was a Beardie. 30lbs soaking wet, sweet beyond words, utterly kind, never bit. Would have died for me. I think her presence alone deterred some bad people, a few times, but I also think that if the bad people in question had really wanted to do something as violent and dangerous as grab a child in public, there is little chance they'd be stopped by a larger dog.



  10. #30
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    Jul. 13, 2008
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    I suspect that more kids get bitten - and yes, really bitten, not nipped - and mauled by dogs every year than get snatched by strangers, or abused by non-family in a situation where the family dog would be around to protect them. So why get a protection/guard breed to protect the kids? It's like getting a mammoth SUV to protect your children, despite the fact that your larger, heavier vehicle is now an increased menace to every child traveling in a car.

    Personally, my childhood pet was a Beardie. 30lbs soaking wet, sweet beyond words, utterly kind, never bit. Would have died for me. I think her presence alone deterred some bad people, a few times, but I also think that if the bad people in question had really wanted to do something as violent and dangerous as grab a child in public, there is little chance they'd be stopped by a larger dog.



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Aug. 6, 2010
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    16

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    I am fostering a JRTx and boy does he get protective! Little body with a big bark when someone comes to the door! He even will be sitting in my lap and growl and anyone coming over just to say hi! He is a trip! Lots of personality!



  12. #32
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    Jun. 7, 2002
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    I think that "bark when needed" ( I hate yappers) and size / looks are a good deterrent. It's true that a lot of accidents / mauling happen with these so-called "protection dogs" that have not been well-trained, or trained enough.

    I've known GSDs, Dobermans and all kinds of good-size mutts to be great protection dogs just because of their attitude (not threatening per se, but off-standish with strangers), their size, and their looks.

    My parents have a Tervueren who, while she is very friendly and doesn't have a mean bone in her body, has that attitude/looks and definitely give strangers pause! She truly looks like a small wolf.

    My sister lives in an area where there are regular break-ins, so she has a protection dog - he lives in the court yard and no one (not even the mailman, who knows him) will get in without anyone being home. I'm not scared of dogs but his size, bark and attitude are all very impressive! He is a Podhal (Polish Tatra sheepdog).
    http://www.podhalan.pl/Podhalany/wzorzec-ang.html
    More of a farm / barn dog tho. Too big, sheddy and smelly for me personally!

    The only other dog that gave me pause once, was a Briard.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Briard
    You can't see their eyes...lol
    Ottbs - The finish line is only the beginning!



  13. #33
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    Nov. 3, 2011
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    81

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    I vote for the English mastiff, if you can stand the drooling
    Big, bred to stay home and gaurd the manor, protective but not inclined to bite, no doubt will as a last resort but rather stand between a suspicious person and its family, escalating the confrontation only if the person doesn't back down or owner says otherwise. I've yet to meet a person bad ass enough not to back off. All of mine have been great with kids and smaller pets.
    I grew up with police k 9 dogs, all GSD, and they were highly trained, but so well tempered they lived in the house as a family member when off duty. Loved those guys, but honestly my mastiffs seem to do what these guys did instinctually, no actual training outside of regular obedience.



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Apr. 24, 2010
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    225

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    My Dobie is the best protection dog. While he is a big cram puff, he is very standoffish with people he doesn't know until I let him know that they are ok. He doesn't bark much but when he does you know someone is there that shouldn't be. He is great with the horses and plays "tag" with my newborn foal. I think she has bitten him many times and he just lets it go and walks away when she gets too rough. That being said he will NOT allow any male to walk into my house after dark unless I open the door and let them in. While I don't have any children of my own a friend has 2 daughters that don't really have manners and he tolerates them and has even let the youngest, when she was 3, drag him around the farm by his tongue. He has never bitten anyone but he has put his mouth on people and said "stay right there until my mom says that you are ok". I have owned alot of different breeds and keep coming back to the Dobies. I don't think I will ever own another breed.
    Member of the Standardbreds with Saddles Clique!


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  15. #35
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2009
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    Area 51
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    Quote Originally Posted by sophie View Post
    I think that "bark when needed" ( I hate yappers) and size / looks are a good deterrent. It's true that a lot of accidents / mauling happen with these so-called "protection dogs" that have not been well-trained, or trained enough.

    I've known GSDs, Dobermans and all kinds of good-size mutts to be great protection dogs just because of their attitude (not threatening per se, but off-standish with strangers), their size, and their looks.

    My parents have a Tervueren who, while she is very friendly and doesn't have a mean bone in her body, has that attitude/looks and definitely give strangers pause! She truly looks like a small wolf.

    My sister lives in an area where there are regular break-ins, so she has a protection dog - he lives in the court yard and no one (not even the mailman, who knows him) will get in without anyone being home. I'm not scared of dogs but his size, bark and attitude are all very impressive! He is a Podhal (Polish Tatra sheepdog).
    http://www.podhalan.pl/Podhalany/wzorzec-ang.html
    More of a farm / barn dog tho. Too big, sheddy and smelly for me personally!

    The only other dog that gave me pause once, was a Briard.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Briard
    You can't see their eyes...lol
    hahaha--it says that Chewbacca was modeled after the Briard! Learn something new everyday!
    I LOVE my Chickens!



  16. #36
    Join Date
    Jul. 26, 2007
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    779

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    Kerry Blue Terriers, bred to help the farmer work the farm, control rodents, and protect/entertain the wife and kids when the farmer was away from the home. Medium-sized, non-shedding, and full of personality. Very smart and bred to be independent thinkers, though, so require an owner who can provide constructive guidance to a puppy to instill good habits.


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  17. #37
    Join Date
    Nov. 27, 2007
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    Glen Burnie, Maryland
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    46

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    If you don't want a dog that will actually attack (which I think would be a huge homeowner liability) I would vote for a Collie. I don't think Collies have a mean bone in their body (at least mine don't) but they will bark their fool heads off if they see something they don't approve of. Nobody comes near my house without my 2 Collies sounding the alarm, and they sound fierce enough that any burglar would think twice about breaking into my house.



  18. #38
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    Nov. 24, 2006
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    Some collies will absolutely stop a threat. I was raised with rough collies all my life. I clearly remember my brother getting a swat on the behind and yelling about it, a collie came around each side of the car and the big male grabbed my dad's hand ;-) Another of our collies jumped from the doorway onto the bed where my brother was wrestling with a buddy and put his mouth around the back of the buddy's neck, not biting, but holding....Collies are protectors when they feel they need to be.
    Kerri



  19. #39
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    Jul. 20, 1999
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    CA
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    How dangerous is your neighborhood?



  20. #40
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    May. 5, 2011
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    Our standard poodle is extremely protective of the house and us. Me especially. She would eat someone alive if they aren't supposed to be here. She loves people though and is friendly if you're supposed to be here.

    The minis are great little alarms, but at 15lbs, they're not good for much beyond that. They'd stand and bark at someone, but would easily be run off.

    We don't have kids, but friends with small kids come over and all the poodles (we have two miniatures and a standard) are great with the kids. They will let them do anything to them.



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