The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2000
    Location
    passepartout
    Posts
    10,076

    Default rider fitness cont'd: ACSM Journal's High-Intensity Circuit Training Program

    A fellow COTHer alerted me to this paper in the American College of Sports Medicine's May-June 2013 Health & Fitness Journal:

    HIGH-INTENSITY CIRCUIT TRAINING USING BODY WEIGHT: Maximum Results With Minimal Investment

    The suggested circuit consists of straightforward bodyweight exercises; the only piece of equipment required is a chair. The entire circuit of 12 exercises should take approximately 7 minutes and can be repeated two or three times, if you're fit enough.

    So, have at it.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct. 22, 2001
    Posts
    5,149

    Default

    Isn't this the same one that was featured in the NYT's Well Blog recently?

    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/0...inute-workout/



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2012
    Location
    Twin Cities
    Posts
    2,142

    Default

    This just doesn't fit with my lifestyle

    Picking Thing Up From Apartment Floor Rescheduled For Thursday


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 1999
    Location
    Tuscaloosa, Alabama
    Posts
    11,208

    Default

    Please please PLEASE see your doctor, or at least be VERY honest in your self assessment of your abilities before beginning an exercise program. If there is even a doubt, classify yourself as detrained/beginner and follow the recommended modifications for that classification. If you have never had a physical exam, have one before you begin any program - but especially one like this.

    Also, do NOT stand on a chair pictured like the one in the exercise example. Or any chair, for that matter. What is the first safety rule listed on chairs? DO NOT STAND. Why? They are designed for sitting, and can be unstable for standing. Instead, INVEST IN PLYOMETRIC BOXES DESIGNED SPECIFICALLY FOR THIS USE (http://www.newyorkbarbells.com/1210-12.html). Stepping up 18" (standard chair height) can be a major balance issue for many. Without handles or an assist, the risk of falling is increased. Also, when properly performing a step up, the spine should be in as neutral a position as possible, with the majority of muscular action coming from the hip flexors/extensors. If you can't step up with your spine "straight" and upright unassisted, reduce the height to a position where you can. If you can, do these step-ups in a narrow hallway, where you can reach each wall easily, placing the palm against the wall to help stabilize you throughout the movement.
    When blood is the beverage of choice, the sharpest fangs feed first.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2006
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    5,053

    Default

    Very interesting-- both the paper and Robby's caveat. Perhaps this summer I will start again even though I am not prepping for a 3 day!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 6, 2010
    Posts
    383

    Default

    How funny, my sister was just telling me about this today and I figured I'd try it tomorrow instead of my usual run. I always hear how HIIT is better for you, but really haven't found a HIIT workout that I like better than just going on a run so haven't really seen if it is better yet...



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 4, 2004
    Posts
    2,631

    Default

    I'll try it tomorrow--I like fast. I will have to sub something for the chair though. Maybe I don't understand HIIT but some of those don't seem anaerobic (the wall sit, the plank/side plank)?



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 7, 2001
    Location
    Usually too far from the barn
    Posts
    8,802

    Default

    I've been doing Tabata classes at my gym and love them. I've toned up a lot. The regimen is 45 minutes. An exercise or combination of moves is repeated for 20 seconds followed by a 10 second rest. Once you have done the move 8 times, you begin a new move. The moves alternate between cardio and toning. Instructors offer low impact or less strenuous alternatives for each move.
    F O.B
    Resident racing historian ~~~ Re-riders Clique
    Founder of the Mighty Thoroughbred Clique



Similar Threads

  1. Fitness training
    By JackieG in forum Eventing
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Nov. 26, 2012, 11:57 AM
  2. Rider Fitness - how to do I get some?
    By Corky in forum Eventing
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: Oct. 26, 2012, 04:39 PM
  3. Need a fitness program
    By Heliodoro in forum Eventing
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: Sep. 16, 2011, 12:44 AM
  4. Rider Fitness
    By Kdash1228 in forum Dressage
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: Jun. 15, 2011, 06:30 AM
  5. Replies: 20
    Last Post: May. 27, 2011, 10:24 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness