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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2010
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    2,204

    Default Mouse problem

    My parents house has apparently succumbed to a mouse problem. I was over for mothers day and they told me they got 4 in one night. The problem is that they are using glue traps, which I'm pretty sure are inhumane. I want to offer something that doesn't make mice die a slow death. Poison is out because they have dogs. I suggested borrowing a few barn cats but they don't like that idea either. Any ideas? Apparently it's a pretty big problem, they're eating through entire bags of stuff.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2007
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    8,417

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    Mice are disease spreaders and present an clear and present danger to humans when they infest a house. Glue traps are effective. In the great scheme of things worrying about humane treatment of disease vectors seems to be an exercise in political correctness, if not futility.

    One way to help ease the problem is to address the source of mouse feed. Put the bags of stuff into cans, bottles, tins, etc. Also look at the house and plug up any holes they are entering with steel wool. It's also not benign for mouse but my health is more important than the mice comfort.

    If the glue traps are working then stick with what works. Add to it sequestration of food sources and blocking holes and problem should be brought under control.

    G.
    Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão


    3 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
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    Northeast
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    10,192

    Default

    These Kness traps are efficient. Almost always a head catch, so quick. Can be washed and reused.

    http://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&key...l_12lxc9xujh_b

    I would be careful placing these that an inquisitive dog doesn't get them. I use the wooden traps to keep cats out of house plants. Would not use these.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    Canada
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    13,897

    Default

    Wooden traps are also effective in keeping dogs off furniture and for discouraging counter surfers...never caught a dog yet.

    Now I have a theory (unproven) that while there are mice around at least there are not any rats. I claim the rats cannibalise the mouse nests and eat the babies. I hate rats worse than mice.

    I hope my little weasel will hang around and do the job for me, cutest little thing.
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
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    2,966

    Default

    PLEASE - NO GLUE TRAPS. THEY ARE INHUMANE. PERIOD. In fact, the stores around here don't even sell them anymore because of it. If you need to trap, even the old-fashioned "snap traps" are more humane than the glue ones.

    The biggest cure is, as mentioned before - to be sure to stop up with steel wool EVERY SINGLE POSSIBLE ENTRANCE HOLE. Keep in mind that mice can squeeze through a hole the size of a dime. Otherwise, you can trap all you want, but you'll be trapping for the rest of your life, because as you trap/kill the current population, more will just move in to take their place.

    And of course - also as previously mentioned - to keep all bagged/boxed foodstuffs in glass or heavy-duty hard-plastic canisters. There's no way around that.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2000
    Location
    midwest
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    10,134

    Default

    We've used steel wool in suspected openings but nothing beats the trap of your choice. I hate glue traps but I hate disease more so I kill any mice caught on a glue trap so they don't suffer.



  7. #7
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    Sep. 5, 2011
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    2,966

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    Quote Originally Posted by SLW View Post
    We've used steel wool in suspected openings but nothing beats the trap of your choice. I hate glue traps but I hate disease more so I kill any mice caught on a glue trap so they don't suffer.
    Snap traps are just as effective, more humane, & also REUSABLE.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Alabama
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    Default

    To get rid of mice, you have to block the way they are getting in. Some old houses have openings under the eaves to allow air circulation, instead of the roof vents, and other vents we use now. If you have the aluminum vents with the under eave metal, it should stop them that way. Are there big gaps under outside doors? If so the strike plates by the latches can be adjusted to close tighter, and bottom jambs (spelling?) can be replaced with a tighter fit jamb. If there is siding, and there are gaps near the ground, then it needs to be blocked with steel wool, and the dark orange fire-rated foam insulation. Are outside doors being blocked open? And do all opened windows have screens? Is there a basement? And if so, is it packed full of stuff? Is there an attic full of stuff? Once the mice are gone you need to have the electrical system in places like the attic, and basement checked for chewed wires. Check behind the fridge and stove for chewed wires also. Clean out the pantry, everything should be checked for chew marks, and all poop needs to be removed and the entire pantry sanitized. Everything needs to be in thick plastic storage or metal containers. All pipe entrances under sinks need to have the orange foam blocking the wall entrance.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 10, 2003
    Location
    Michigan, USA
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    3,095

    Default

    Glue traps are inhumane, as are poison (who wants to slowly bleed to death internally?) and snap traps (if they catch the mouse behind the head, they're humane. When they snare a leg or half of the mouse and you see the poor thing frantically struggling to get free, it's awful).
    I would suggest a shock trap. I think that's probably the most humane solution.
    In a house the most important thing is to prevent them from getting in. You really shouldn't need traps.
    *CrowneDragon*
    As Peter, Paul, and Mary say, a dragon lives forever.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 21, 2012
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    1,258

    Default

    It's your parent's business and if what they are doing is working- I wouldn't burden them with the PC earful. Google Hanta Virus. I have a close relative who died of a very strange sickness that set in exactly the day after he'd done a major cleaning of the garage. As his wife drove him to the hospital he communicated his last wishes to her. He knew he was a goner as he began to drown on dry land. He was isolated in the hospital and his death was not fast- it was horrible. He was a healthy young man- he left behind a pregnant wife and young son.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
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    Feb. 4, 2000
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    up a creek without a saddle
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    The most effective method I've used is a bucket of water, with a 1 x 4 "ramp" up to the rim. Smear peanut butter a few inches under the rim, just about where they have to stretch to reach it. They fall in, and trust me, they can't swim. Sounds too simple, but it works better than anything else I've tried.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 4, 2004
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    2,612

    Default

    I have a Rodent Terminator in the barn and garage (elec shock) and it is very effective. Not cheap, $45 or so on Amazon. Have to admit, though, it was as much my squeamishness about constantly cleaning up splattered mouse parts and traps as it was for the mice. I guess if your parents are happy with the glue traps, it just depends on if you want to spend the money to get them something you are more comfortable with.

    Agree with other posters that in a house the larger issue is how are they getting in, are they nesting in the walls, etc.



  13. #13
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    Jun. 24, 2005
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    Alabama
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    Make sure that if you have a rodent problem, or have been in a place that has evidence of rodent infestation, that if you get sick you tell the doctor about the rodents. Many of the hanta virus-type illnesses aren't hard to treat successfully, but the doctors have to know you've been exposed, so you get prompt treatment and the correct treatment.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White


    2 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul. 21, 2006
    Location
    South Carolina
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    4,935

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SAcres View Post
    My parents house has apparently succumbed to a mouse problem. I was over for mothers day and they told me they got 4 in one night. The problem is that they are using glue traps, which I'm pretty sure are inhumane. I want to offer something that doesn't make mice die a slow death. Poison is out because they have dogs.
    I hate glue traps and poison. I was going to suggest . . . dogs. What's up with your folks' dogs that they won't kill a mouse or twelve?

    Originally posted by Sparky
    The most effective method I've used is a bucket of water, with a 1 x 4 "ramp" up to the rim. Smear peanut butter a few inches under the rim, just about where they have to stretch to reach it. They fall in, and trust me, they can't swim. .
    I've seen rats swim like Mark Spitz. Surely mice can't be that different?



  15. #15
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    Mar. 10, 2007
    Location
    Montana
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    4,916

    Default

    Well they have mice b/c they don't have cats. If they don't want to give on that point then they deserve what they get!

    We're about as hardcore as it gets but we won't have glue traps here either, we only had to stomp on one half bald alive mouse to put it out of its misery to switch to snap traps. The water buckets work super well too. If they can keep an eye on the dogs the poison will work-no biggie if a dog eats a dehydrated mouse but certainly it can't eat a bunch of the poison.

    It's a little rough b/c two of the best methods are eliminated-cats and poison. If it's already bad they're going to have a hard time unless they make some concessions.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun. 5, 2007
    Location
    New Hampshire
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    1,190

    Default

    Our house has mice in the dropped ceiling in the basement. They find their way into the kitchen from the hole in the floor under the stove.

    Our house is a 1969 ranch. The basement windows are shot and the bulkhead needs to be replaced. Until we get to those two items, we deal with the mice.

    Snap traps. Fast kill and effective.
    Siamese Cat. Strong deterrent (although he's too dumb to kill them. Lol)

    Once the windows and bulkhead are replaced and the basement can be sealed from the outside, we'll take a much stronger approach to erradicate the mice which will include poison.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun. 5, 2007
    Location
    New Hampshire
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    1,190

    Default

    Our house has mice in the dropped ceiling in the basement. They find their way into the kitchen from the hole in the floor under the stove.

    Our house is a 1969 ranch. The basement windows are shot and the bulkhead needs to be replaced. Until we get to those two items, we deal with the mice.

    Snap traps. Fast kill and effective.
    Siamese Cat. Strong deterrent (although he's too dumb to kill them. Lol)

    Once the windows and bulkhead are replaced and the basement can be sealed from the outside, we'll take a much stronger approach to erradicate the mice which will include poison.



  18. #18
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    Nov. 6, 2002
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    Henrico, NC 36 30'50.49" N 77 50'17.47" W
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    5,773

    Default

    Tall kitchen plastic trash can, with nothing in it except a little bait-like cheese, pushed up against something that they climb on-like cabinets. The next morning you will have several mice in it. They go in but can't climb back out. Dispose as you see fit. Wash, and repeat each night until you stop catching mice.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2006
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    Behind the cheddar curtain
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    115

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sparky View Post
    The most effective method I've used is a bucket of water, with a 1 x 4 "ramp" up to the rim. Smear peanut butter a few inches under the rim, just about where they have to stretch to reach it. They fall in, and trust me, they can't swim. Sounds too simple, but it works better than anything else I've tried.
    Totally agree with this. We smear the peanut butter on the bucket handle, but same idea. But this works well, and is non toxic, and reusable.



  20. #20
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    Feb. 1, 2012
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    Vermont
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    4,842

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    Quote Originally Posted by pAin't_Misbehavin' View Post
    I've seen rats swim like Mark Spitz. Surely mice can't be that different?
    They can swim, but they can't get OUT of the bucket, so they basically swim to death in the water.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



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