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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2010
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    Tucson
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    5,784

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    I had a palomino QH who was the single most powerful horse I have ever ridden (beyond some very fancy WBs I've ridden) and we only did 4' courses because I was chicken to go higher even though he did with my trainer.

    So I'm looking at this purely with the assumption the QH stallion and your mare are both the quality to make it worth breeding and a match for each other - and saying go for it. You didn't give us any real info on how much research and studying you've done on their quality, his offspring, how it matches up with your mare's breeding, how they would complement each other, etc., but I'm going to assume you either did or will do that research before making a decision, and say just based on color and knowing you could end up with a bay, chestnut, something else, go for it.
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug. 6, 2000
    Location
    lexington, virginia
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    359

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    If you're not dying to have a buckskin, why breed to a Palomino quarter horse if your interest is hunters? There are many spectacular Hunter sires available and if it is a matter of cost, I can assure you the stud fee will be the cheapest part of breeding a horse you want to keep.

    Go to sport horse breeding and peruse some of the hunter stallions. Cunningham, Paparazzo, Cabardino, Popeye K, etc etc etc. Or go to UESF and see who is fathering the youngsters winning line, not that I think that means you'll end up with a great riding horses, but that's a whole 'nother debate.

    Plus, I was just talking to my vet about the ocular problems inherent in many color breeds, including Palominos.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2012
    Posts
    292

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    For a while I showed this absolutely lovely big palomino QH gelding. He was one of the most stunning horses I have ever seen, and was a lovely hunter. Since he was an excellent mover, his color helped him out since you couldn't help but notice him, and he had great presence in the ring. He cleaned up at shows. I don't think he ever lost a pleasure class.
    And, as for buckskins, my mother once knew a great buckskin hunter who won nearly every class he was put in. Once again, he was a phenomenal mover, so his color could only help him, since it drew your eye. Not sure what breed, but apparently he was totally gorgeous. I never saw him, since he was before my time.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2002
    Posts
    2,535

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    For everyone who says her mare would be out of competition for the year of gestation, it doesn't have to be so. If she is in shape, there is no reason she can't continue to work under saddle up to a couple of months before she foals. When I was breeding, some of our horses worked up to a month before they foaled, and went back to work with baby at the side a month after foaling.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2001
    Location
    down the road from bar.ka
    Posts
    31,047

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    Nobody really said she would be out of work completely but some care has to be taken plus some mares do have issues while pregnant and have to take it easy-you never can be sure, particularly a maiden mare.

    I don't see obviously pregnant mares jumping around at the shows much less one with a foal hollering for mom so it has to be factored into the decision to breed a bit if you only own the one horse.

    I am more concerned that if this proposed mating takes place, it is likely to create just another bay or chestnut grade horse in a market glutted with them if OP finds she needs to sell, even if she plans on forever, that can get cut short.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct. 4, 2012
    Posts
    135

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    Color is great. I used to show a very flashy overo, and color was never an issue for us (just don't make mistakes- people will remember you forever!).

    With that being said, my family owns several TB/QH crosses and they ALL have leg/foot/soundness issues. Different TB bloodlines, different QH bloodlines. I'm not sure if we got unlucky or if it is a combining thing. Just a heads up.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,493

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigBayHunter9272 View Post
    My trainer and I have been toying with the idea of breeding my bay TB mare. My trainer knows of a very flashy palomino quarter horse stallion that moves well and is built nicely for a hunter and thinks he would be a great match for my mare. Being that my mare is a bay and the stallion is a palomino, there's a high chance that the foal would be buckskin. I have no problem with a buckskin baby, but what about as a hunter??!! Is it good to stand out in the field of bay hunters?? Or too extreme for mainstream hunter judges? (Think: paints and appys aren't favorites in the hunters)
    At best it's a 50/50 chance, and at worst it's 12.5%. You can also get palomino or smoky black as your dilute colors, as well as bay, brown, black, or chestnut.

    Who is the stallion, if I may ask?

    Background: mare and I currently show in the 3ft at schooling and smaller rated shows. Baby would be a hunter prospect for me to keep, not necessarily to sell.
    But selling is a possibility, no matter what one thinks in the beginning. So, why would you want to "settle" for a horse who may only ever be suitable for 3' schooling shows? That dramatically lowers your potential buyer pool. I'm not saying there aren't some QH stallions who are quite capable of producing a solid 3' AA Hunter at rated shows, but unless I knew for certain he already had kids doing that, or better, there is no way I would choose him for a Hunter sire, no matter how well he moves.

    there are PLENTY of really, really nice Hunter stallions out there, including quite a few now who are colored. Heck, I'd choose RFF Starbuck for a guaranteed dilute Hunter foal if I was set on going the QH route (assuming compatibility with the mare).

    Colored Hunters, both dilute and spotted, are not nearly as rare these days as 10 years ago. At Sedgefield's A show a couple of weeks ago there were 2 pintos in the same small division.

    Ivory Coast is a truly fantastic TB Hunter stallion who is a double dilute and would guarantee you color as well as GREATLY increase the odds you get a really nice Hunter foal.

    Firstly, be sure YOU want to breed your mare for a future Hunter (or whatever) mount. That is up to you - not your trainer, unless you trainer and you want to do a breeding lease on her Then, choose a stallion who best suits your mare AND has kids doing at least what you want to be doing. Don't settle for the pretty palomino QH stallion just because he's close and moves well. Don't settle for the highest odds of producing a lower level horse. Breeding for higher does not always end up getting there, and THEN you have your nice lower level horse. But if you do end up with the higher level horse, then you have a MUCH better chance of finding a nice home for it down the road.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET


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  8. #28
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
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    35,493

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kiera View Post
    With that being said, my family owns several TB/QH crosses and they ALL have leg/foot/soundness issues. Different TB bloodlines, different QH bloodlines. I'm not sure if we got unlucky or if it is a combining thing. Just a heads up.
    You've got to be unlucky Maybe environment, maybe management, maybe poor choice of purchases or breedings. But there is not anything inherently bad about a TB/QH cross.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET


    2 members found this post helpful.

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