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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 25, 2001
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    2,545

    Default Medication in Horse Racing, Part II

    Wish I had posted part I. This is really interesting:

    http://www.thoroughbreddailynews.com...TOKEN=22516891
    "If you can't feed 'em, don't breed 'em."



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 5, 2009
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    1,407

    Default

    Very interesting indeed--and very scary.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 25, 2001
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    Default

    "If you can't feed 'em, don't breed 'em."



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2011
    Location
    So California
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    2,981

    Default

    Thanks for the article. Mind boggling and depressing.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 23, 2004
    Location
    Los Angeles
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    977

    Default

    I think if you hid the identity and the fact that that was a racehorse, the care for A Circuit showhorses wouldn't look that different (other than Lasix of course).

    A non racing barn I was in used to call joint injections "maintenance" and I don't think we were unique or even particularly heavy duty on meds.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 20, 2000
    Posts
    1,106

    Default

    Its one thing to know about drug use, but to see it written down is particularly revolting.
    I dont really get it when people who defend racing bring up abuses in other horse sports, but I remember reading the thread about that trainer whose pony dropped dead after she gave it an injection, and the long list of meds given to that pony. Sickening also, but I think main difference is that racehorses are so much at risk for a catastrophic breakdown, where the show horses are just cantering round and round and round and round.
    I just dont understand people though, the trainers or the owners or the vets.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 23, 2004
    Location
    Los Angeles
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    977

    Default

    Some people just don't see the use of therapeutic medications (and especially anti inflammatories) for a high performance horse as abusive per se. Being a racehorse is a hard job. OTOH if there was a mepivicaine injection on a horse in training, I'd be the first in line with the pitchfork. Same with any other blockers or stimulants or EPO.

    This is not a black and white issue.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 25, 2001
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    Default

    "If you can't feed 'em, don't breed 'em."



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 15, 2008
    Posts
    2,953

    Default

    hmm. and this bill was dropped yesterday:

    By Mr. PITTS (for himself, Mr. Whitfield, Ms.
    Schakowsky, and Ms. Eshoo):
    H.R. 2012. A bill to improve the integrity and safety of
    interstate horseracing, and for other purposes; to the
    Committee on Energy and Commerce.


    no text yet so i called over there; has to do with testing of horses that race in simulcast races. apparently a follow on to an earlier senate bill, s. 973.

    http://www.tomudall.senate.gov/?p=press_release&id=1283
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Gravity works, and the laws of physics are a bitch.

    Member: Rabid Garden Snail Clique



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,527

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pronzini View Post
    Some people just don't see the use of therapeutic medications (and especially anti inflammatories) for a high performance horse as abusive per se. Being a racehorse is a hard job. OTOH if there was a mepivicaine injection on a horse in training, I'd be the first in line with the pitchfork. Same with any other blockers or stimulants or EPO.

    This is not a black and white issue.
    Exactly. And if the show horses are REALLY sound and just "cantering around", why do they need so many injections (including ones that aren't actually allowed?) Never mind they also work longer over time and as such get as much or more wear and tear than a racehorse who in most cases is five or six when they retire--we've seen hunter/jumper people justify the massive amount of "maintenance" injections with "it means they're able to keep working"? Ie, the old 3'6" horse who instead of being retired gets joint injections and 'handed down' to keep campaigning at lower levels (plus the painkillers.) And that doesn't bring up the extra "calming agents", testable or not, and the justification "I need to give my horse a good experience, so I give him something to calm him down."

    Racing if anything has less dubious drugging because it involves interstate gaming and gets monitored a lot more. For some other disciplines, the attitude seems to be "It's okay because this is a hobby/I'm paying a lot of money/it's not a rated show so no one's testing." Lasix for all might be debatable, but joints? If racehorses shouldn't get it and it's proof they're not really sound, what does that say about all the show horses who "need" their joints done to show?


    1 members found this post helpful.

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