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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eclectic Horseman View Post
    Because a lot of riders go right from a 26 year old school horse on whom they have been taking lessons or part-leased to a 3 or 4 year old OTTB that they have adopted as a rescue. These riders would be unsuited to a 3 or 4 year old horse of any kind, let alone one that is a fit athlete that may have "baggage."

    As the OP is learning from this thread, it is not just a matter of the right bit, and bingo, you have yourself a pleasure horse.
    Thing is, that's a RIDER problem, not a horse problem. Unless you buy a three-year-old who washed out with injuries or brain problems, in which case you NEED a trainer who works with problems, not OTTBs specifically, you do not need to treat a racehorse like it's an insane firebreathing lunatic that needs to be handled like a wild thing straight off the range. I think some trainers create a bigger mental block by acting like they have to start from absolute scratch, which is just as bad as throwing the horse into full training the instant they get home.

    The RIGHT trainer (who understands racehorses and that they are not trained 'wrong', they're not insane, and they are not babies) can be a big help. Online advice can point you the right way, and online is a good place to find out why racehorses do what they do, but no one can know from one post by the OP if it's bit, saddle, just needs more time, mental issue, or whether the horse is suited to a pleasure life.


    8 members found this post helpful.

  2. #42
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    Jul. 14, 2003
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    MA
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    Quote Originally Posted by danceronice View Post
    Thing is, that's a RIDER problem, not a horse problem. Unless you buy a three-year-old who washed out with injuries or brain problems, in which case you NEED a trainer who works with problems, not OTTBs specifically, you do not need to treat a racehorse like it's an insane firebreathing lunatic that needs to be handled like a wild thing straight off the range. I think some trainers create a bigger mental block by acting like they have to start from absolute scratch, which is just as bad as throwing the horse into full training the instant they get home.

    The RIGHT trainer (who understands racehorses and that they are not trained 'wrong', they're not insane, and they are not babies) can be a big help. Online advice can point you the right way, and online is a good place to find out why racehorses do what they do, but no one can know from one post by the OP if it's bit, saddle, just needs more time, mental issue, or whether the horse is suited to a pleasure life.
    As I recall, you asked why OTTBs had a reputation of being so "scary" and I gave you the answer. YES, it IS a rider problem. I haven't seen trainers contribute to this poor reputation, except perhaps to appropriately warn their riding students that an OTTB may not be suitable for them to own.

    As far as starting an OTTB over is concerned, I think that the key is to ASSUME NOTHING when dealing with an OTTB. Some come from wonderful owners & trainers who start them like riding horses. Others are started so poorly and/or handled so abusively that they are mentally fried. I have reschooled several OTTBs and each was different. Again, the key is not to ASSUME anything.
    "Against stupidity the gods themselves contend in vain" ~Friedrich Schiller


    4 members found this post helpful.

  3. #43
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    Nov. 16, 2004
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    NE Indiana
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    OP? Where'd ya go?

    *sigh*


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #44
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    Sep. 11, 2008
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    Was wondering the same thing!!

    Quote Originally Posted by hundredacres View Post
    OP? Where'd ya go?

    *sigh*



  5. #45
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    May. 30, 2006
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    Little Rhody
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    Lost her/him after it was pointed out a new bit wasn't going to turn the horse into a pleasure mount.
    ;-)


    6 members found this post helpful.

  6. #46
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    May. 4, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Laurierace View Post
    Not a fan of the rope halter either. I think they are too easy to put pressure on without meaning to and the pressure is much more intense than a chain unless you are shanking the hell out of it.
    Does not sound like many are aware of the use of a rope halter, the knots are the key issue, and they have to be adjusted for different horses. If you are torqueing on the poll that hard, you have no clue what you are doing, and you are right, you are better off with a halter of any sort. You will not have any control over any horse, no matter what you use, unless you know how to handle the horse to begin with. A chain over the nose can break the nose bone, I never, ever had to use one directly on the bone, if I did there was something more needed than leading the horse that day. In other words, learn something about the pressure points, which exist in two areas in the poll area, same goes over the nose, hence why if you have the respect of the horse, (or even if you don't if you are a brutal manhandler) you can bend the horses head down pretty much to the chest with two fingers over the nose. These points are also known as acupressure points in case anyone wants to futher their education. I would not use a rope halter going to the post in a race but I also really despise the use of lip chains and tongue ties too. All of this crap would not be needed if the horse was handled and trained from the get go in the right way. Take a look at Orb and the Janney's. Different kind of horsemen and women. I took a very reactive, abused, claustrophobic horse and totally changed his handling with the use of the right kind of knotted rope halter. Try it, you might like it, but first, like everything else in life that one is not used to do, you do have to know the theory for the use and how to apply that theory.
    "When written in Chinese, the word "crisis" is composed of two characters, one represents danger, the other represents opportunity."

    John F Kennedy


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #47
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    May. 9, 2013
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    2

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    I want to thank everyone for your response. I was visiting friends in des moines Ia. when this horse was not going to have a future any longer so I gave little monies and they delivered her to Mont. for me. I ride quarter horses have for 35 years, (for those who thought my questions were novice) Good news though, I had her in pasture for 2 days when a jockey and trainer spotted her from the road and asked if I wanted to enter her in the Mothers Day and Bucking Horse Sale horse races. Well I did, she has been at the local fair grounds now for 2 wks and doing what she loves. Since there was so much rain Sun. they will have the races this sat. Memorial weekend instead. Third race 5th hole, 6 furlongs. I got her insured today and will probably breed her thereafter. Too fast and too much horse for this little roper on quarter horses. But thank you to each one that took the time to help. I think it is wonderful to get different opinions whenever I need to learn which is daily. Thx


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #48
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    Mar. 8, 2004
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    Baltimore, MD
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    Quote Originally Posted by Calamber View Post
    Does not sound like many are aware of the use of a rope halter, the knots are the key issue, and they have to be adjusted for different horses. If you are torqueing on the poll that hard, you have no clue what you are doing, and you are right, you are better off with a halter of any sort. You will not have any control over any horse, no matter what you use, unless you know how to handle the horse to begin with. A chain over the nose can break the nose bone, I never, ever had to use one directly on the bone, if I did there was something more needed than leading the horse that day. In other words, learn something about the pressure points, which exist in two areas in the poll area, same goes over the nose, hence why if you have the respect of the horse, (or even if you don't if you are a brutal manhandler) you can bend the horses head down pretty much to the chest with two fingers over the nose. These points are also known as acupressure points in case anyone wants to futher their education. I would not use a rope halter going to the post in a race but I also really despise the use of lip chains and tongue ties too. All of this crap would not be needed if the horse was handled and trained from the get go in the right way. Take a look at Orb and the Janney's. Different kind of horsemen and women. I took a very reactive, abused, claustrophobic horse and totally changed his handling with the use of the right kind of knotted rope halter. Try it, you might like it, but first, like everything else in life that one is not used to do, you do have to know the theory for the use and how to apply that theory.
    I handled horses on and off the track for 25 years. I think I know how to handle a horse. I have never used a rope halter so I guess you are right there that I don't know how to use it. Don't want to know how to use it either so no harm done. Orb goes to the paddock in a stabilizer which is just another version of a lip chain.


    8 members found this post helpful.

  9. #49
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    Feb. 26, 2011
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    Glad you came back OP! Sorry Miles City got all the rain, that party is epic!!!
    From AliCat518 "Seriously, why would you NOT put fried chicken in your purse?!"


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #50
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    Nov. 18, 2010
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    california
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    Breeding her because you don't want to take the time to learn to ride/train her ? Even quarter horses need training....


    11 members found this post helpful.

  11. #51
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    May. 30, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by stolen virtue View Post
    Breeding her because you don't want to take the time to learn to ride/train her ? Even quarter horses need training....
    My thoughts exactly.



  12. #52
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    Jul. 19, 2007
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    Michigan
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    Well, if she doesn't want to ride her and has sent her off to run again (sounds like a bush track?) maybe her offspring have local value. Her horse, sounds like she found a use for it, and if OP is used to/likes stock-type working QHs, getting the mare to something she liked would probably be way more work than it's worth and not something the mare would enjoy.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  13. #53
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    Mar. 8, 2004
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    I obviously don't know what their agreement was but I woud be white hot if I gave away a horse to a pleasure home and the new owner immediately sent it off to a bush track.


    22 members found this post helpful.

  14. #54
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    Nov. 13, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Laurierace View Post
    I obviously don't know what their agreement was but I woud be white hot if I gave away a horse to a pleasure home and the new owner immediately sent it off to a bush track.
    Me too. The update by the OP made my heart sink terribly. This poor horse. Reason number 5,000,001 my OTTB stays with me for life. I can scarcely imagine a worse outcome for this horse.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  15. #55
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    Nov. 13, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by raspberry jam View Post
    I want to thank everyone for your response. I was visiting friends in des moines Ia. when this horse was not going to have a future any longer so I gave little monies and they delivered her to Mont. for me. I ride quarter horses have for 35 years, (for those who thought my questions were novice) Good news though, I had her in pasture for 2 days when a jockey and trainer spotted her from the road and asked if I wanted to enter her in the Mothers Day and Bucking Horse Sale horse races. Well I did, she has been at the local fair grounds now for 2 wks and doing what she loves. Since there was so much rain Sun. they will have the races this sat. Memorial weekend instead. Third race 5th hole, 6 furlongs. I got her insured today and will probably breed her thereafter. Too fast and too much horse for this little roper on quarter horses. But thank you to each one that took the time to help. I think it is wonderful to get different opinions whenever I need to learn which is daily. Thx
    Quoted, because I think it may be necessary.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  16. #56
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    Nov. 13, 2009
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    http://www.buckinghorsesale.com/racing.html#

    I believe this horse will be running in the Don Stewart "Hockey Puck Special" for TBs 3 and older that have run for a claiming price of $3,000 or less in 2012 or 2013.

    God, I feel sick. I am so glad that my TB's race owners didn't do this to him, and I am so glad he ended up with me instead of somone who would do this to him.

    Anyone in the area want to go try to buy this horse from the OP? Give her a chance at something other than breaking down at a bush track?


    9 members found this post helpful.

  17. #57
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    Jul. 14, 2003
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    MA
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    I think that is refreshing when someone admits that they are overmounted. So please don't beat the OP up. That's one of the problems with the "adopt an ex-racer" promotions-- not many average riders have the skill set and the temperament to reschool them.

    Kudos to the race trainers who are now starting their young horses with the basics that they will need in order to have a career as riding horses when they come off the track. That is forward thinking that will help secure ex-racers a good home.

    http://offtrackthoroughbreds.com/201...ey-race-train/
    Last edited by Eclectic Horseman; May. 24, 2013 at 02:51 PM. Reason: add link
    "Against stupidity the gods themselves contend in vain" ~Friedrich Schiller


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #58
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    Nov. 13, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eclectic Horseman View Post
    I think that is refreshing when someone admits that they are overmounted. So please don't beat the OP up. That's one of the problems with the "adopt an ex-racer" promotions-- not many average riders have the skill set and the temperament to reschool them.

    Kudos to the race trainers who are now starting their young horses with the basics that they will need in order to have a career as riding horses when they come off the track. That is forward thinking that will help secure ex-racers a good home.
    There are a LOT of ways to address being overmounted OTHER than sending a horse to a bush track and then BREEDING it.

    Like, I don't know, working with a trainer, selling the horse to someone who rides better than you do, NOT BUYING IT IN THE FIRST PLACE. That kind of thing.


    11 members found this post helpful.

  19. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by FineAlready View Post
    There are a LOT of ways to address being overmounted OTHER than sending a horse to a bush track and then BREEDING it.

    Like, I don't know, working with a trainer, selling the horse to someone who rides better than you do, NOT BUYING IT IN THE FIRST PLACE. That kind of thing.
    Everyone makes mistakes, and fixing them is often easier said than done.
    "Against stupidity the gods themselves contend in vain" ~Friedrich Schiller



  20. #60
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    Nov. 13, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eclectic Horseman View Post
    Everyone makes mistakes, and fixing them is often easier said than done.
    Yes, people make mistakes. But this is NOT the way to fix the mistake that has been made here. One other option would be to retire the horse in the field she was apparently turned out in when the jockey/trainer noticed her and suggested she be run at a bush track.


    4 members found this post helpful.

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