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  1. #1
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    Dec. 28, 2012
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    156

    Default x

    x
    Last edited by ponypappy; Aug. 8, 2013 at 02:05 AM.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 16, 2003
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    Staunton, VA, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by ponypappy View Post
    Great Article On The Purchase Of Your Next Horse.


    http://www.ratemyhorsepro.com/news/h...or-a-ride.aspx

    Great article, should be read by all potential horse purchasers and sellers.
    Melyni (PhD) PAS, Dipl. ACAN.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2011
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    Pennsylvania
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    Interesting article, but I bought a low budget horse so most of that stuff didn't really apply. I had a PPE I had a trainer look at the horse, I took my time, asked many many questions and then took the plunge. Fortunately there are many decent low-budget horses out there and I have trustworthy people in my corner. I'd do the same thing if I were looking again.

    One point re: "Drug tests should be considered in all purchases because it costs more to maintain the horse then buying it."


    For goodness sake, proof read your work before publishing. The then/than error really irritates the snot out of me when I see it in supposedly professional articles.

    Paula
    Last edited by paulaedwina; May. 9, 2013 at 08:22 PM. Reason: Didn't proof read my complaint. Sheesh
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).


    5 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2000
    Location
    California
    Posts
    8,371

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    Well, hmmmm...

    As a buyer, sure that all sounds fine and dandy, but I am kind of about not buying "as-is." There is no way to guarantee soundness on any horse - heck, it could bang itself up in the trailer being shipped to the buyer; I also understand that horses are horses. While, yes, I do ask about behavioral issues, I would also not expect a guarantee that a horse would never spook, buck, spin, whatever. Horses are horses. Presumably you are buying a horse because you are interested in a relationship with a living animal, not a motorcycle.

    And as a seller (which I'm not, I've only sold one horse), it would not surprise me to find that my totally mellow-because-I-live-outside horse might show a different temperament if he spent all day in a box stall with minimal turnout. Or if a different shoeing protocol caused gait changes or, or, or . . . there are a million things that can change when a horse moves to a new home.

    The horses I have bought have been as-is sales and honestly, I can't imagine that a seller would agree to such a contract as was laid out in that link. But then again, I'm not in the market for high-dollar horses.

    And, pe, that wasn't the only typo I found!
    My Mustang Adventures - Mac, my mustang | Annwylid D'Lite - my Cob filly

    "A horse's face always conveys clearly whether it is loved by its owner or simply used." - Anja Beran


    3 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2000
    Posts
    1,202

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    Quote Originally Posted by paulaedwina View Post
    Interesting article, but I bought a low budget horse so most of that stuff didn't really apply. I had a PPE I had a trainer look at the horse, I took my time, asked many many questions and then took the plunge. Fortunately there are many decent low-budget horses out there and I have trustworthy people in my corner. I'd do the same thing if I were looking again.

    One point re: "Drug tests should be considered in all purchases because it costs more to maintain the horse then buying it."


    For goodness sake, proof ready your work before publishing. The then/than error really irritates the snot out of me when I see it in supposedly professional articles.

    Paula
    (you may want to edit your proofy comment.

    But I devoutly agree with the drug testing!!!!!!!!!!!!!



  6. #6
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    Mar. 26, 2011
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    Pennsylvania
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    5,165

    Default

    Yeah, Karma. I just caught that. My laptop eats my key strokes and makes me look like an idiot all the time. Don't buy ASUS.

    Paula
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 25, 2005
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    I can tell you as someone that breeds and sells horses I would never 1) guarantee a horse to be shipped to their new owner without injury. I guarantee the horse to be free of injury up until the sale. Once money has changed hands the horse is now the property of the NEW OWNER. i cannot be responsible if they get into a car accident on the way to the new home or get injured in the pasture/ stall between the time of sale to the time of pick up. And 2) a horse can only be sold "as-is". It is up to the buyer to determine what that "as-is" through thorough vetting. If a problem is found they can either renegotiate the price or walk away. there is no warrantee with a living animal.

    When I have sold a horse I give the potential buyer complete vet records (from the routine of deworming, vaccines, farrier to anything more involved). I let them spend time with the horse and am fully open to describe their personalities, habits, etc (thankfully I know these in detail as I have bred and raised the horse).

    It is in my, and the horses I breed, best interest that the right home is found.

    I do agree with everything else. I do think folks need to have written contracts and not oral agreements.
    Read about my time at the Hannoveraner Verband Breeders Courses:
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    5 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 27, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blume Farm View Post
    I can tell you as someone that breeds and sells horses I would never 1) guarantee a horse to be shipped to their new owner without injury. I guarantee the horse to be free of injury up until the sale. Once money has changed hands the horse is now the property of the NEW OWNER. i cannot be responsible if they get into a car accident on the way to the new home or get injured in the pasture/ stall between the time of sale to the time of pick up. And 2) a horse can only be sold "as-is". It is up to the buyer to determine what that "as-is" through thorough vetting. If a problem is found they can either renegotiate the price or walk away. there is no warrantee with a living animal.
    THIS. I can't imagine a seller guaranteeing the horse during shipping and as a buyer I would NEVER expect them to. Absolutely ridiculous. With horses it's buyer beware - either do your homework (i.e. thorough vet check) or accept the risk of the unknown. No 90 day money back guarantees


    2 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
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    5,380

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    I don't spend half a million dollars on a horse, but this still reads like a real estate article?? While I agree that if you are going to make financial agreements, things should be in writing, this seems entirely over-complicated. I also agree that horses only exist "as-is." They are just walking around looking for sharp objects to hurl themselves on -- once you hand over the money or sign the contract, that suicidal beast is your responsibility!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
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    15,467

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    Well.... the buyer can *ask* for anything she wants.

    I'm with Blume Farm, however. It's unreasonable for a seller to consent to guaranteeing the horse during transport to the new owner. And I, too, wondered what the author meant by selling a horse other than "as is." I suppose your purchase agreement could include a frozen blood sample that, if found to contain drugs, could later invalidate the deal. But what else could you do but sell a horse "as is" and give the buyer a chance to vet the boogers out of it?

    Also, as a seller, I'd give the buyer access to all medical records... that I knew about or could remember. But I wouldn't sign something that said I had actually delivered 100% of them for the lifetime of the horse. Owning a horse for a decade or more, there might be some stuff I don't remember. I'd hate to have an unhappy buyer try to invalidate an otherwise legitimate deal later because..... they found a vet to treated my horse for stepping on a clip at a horse show 7 years ago.

    Still, I think the article was thorough and timely. I don't care if it's written to be very pro-buyer. Apparently the modern horse trading industry is dishonest enough that we need this.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
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    Feb. 23, 2005
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    Spotsylvania, VA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RedmondDressage View Post
    THIS. I can't imagine a seller guaranteeing the horse during shipping and as a buyer I would NEVER expect them to. Absolutely ridiculous. With horses it's buyer beware - either do your homework (i.e. thorough vet check) or accept the risk of the unknown. No 90 day money back guarantees
    Isn't this why people buy INSURANCE?
    I wasn't always a Smurf
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    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
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    Jul. 31, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by carolprudm View Post
    Isn't this why people buy INSURANCE?
    Yes, it is.

    The article recommends that, as well as asking the seller to extend their guarantee up to the horse's arrive. To me, that's redundant and contradictory. You need to decide who owns it when and then that person can do whatever risk-limiting they want.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2003
    Location
    MA
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    6,374

    Default

    I was a bit taken aback when I saw the title of the article. I co-wrote an article for Equisearch.com with the same title several years back. My article did not deal with the obvious problem of less than honest sellers, instead it took on the issue of unethical trainers and other brokers who charge fees in the transaction. Far more common problem in my opinion.
    "Against stupidity the gods themselves contend in vain" ~Friedrich Schiller


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2011
    Posts
    535

    Default

    I agree that in this day and age signing an 'as-is' clause is a really bad idea unless you know the horse (not the seller, the actual horse) very well. I recently had to hire an attorney to settle a dispute, he told me the same. IMO the 'as-is' clause is abused by too many sellers to cover their a** while they lie to your face.

    However, I am curious to know what's recommended instead. Just leave the 'as-is' clause out? Just because it's missing doesn't mean you have to add specific guarantees.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul. 16, 2008
    Location
    Central US
    Posts
    164

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    I have been ripped off VERY BADLY by a seller out of Canada and don't think I have any legal recourse. But I am out $22K, not $150K, like this article suggests. That is just terrible!



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