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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul. 30, 2005
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    England
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    Quote Originally Posted by LuvMyTB View Post
    Ah, but she IS in work....20 mins of trotting per day, plus another 20 mins of walking. 6 days/week. She behaves like this no matter what.....and she is Aced for turnout.

    Her behavior was like this prior to the injury, I believe it was what caused the injury......was just looking for anecdotes from others as I haven't come across one like her before.
    I know she's rehabbing, but that's not really work. Can you add something in to tire her brain out?

    Could you try a different sedative?

    I have four fit TBs- two mares and two geldings. The girls aren't too bad, but sometimes I just have to walk away and not watch the boys.
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  2. #22
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2010
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    Tucson
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    5,785

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    Quote Originally Posted by bluebuckets View Post
    And then there are those who truly shouldn't be turned out... and are none the worse for wear. Which would be my mare. Not because she is too silly, but because she literally does not know what to do in turnout and will panic, scream to be brought in, and gallop the fence line constantly until I go catch her. She is obviously more relaxed once she gets to her "house", a stall with a nice sized yard and no mesh grate (It has the bottom boards, but not the mesh top so she can put her head over her "wall", if that makes sense, and a swinging door, not a sliding door) and a neighbor she can visit with that she just adores (the other mare is kinda like her nanny).

    We tried for three years to introduce her to turnout, and this would happen consistently. Since she functions perfectly well without it, we figured that it was kinder to avoid stressing her this much and will just leave her in her stall, and give her a spin around the lunge line when she needs to get a few bucks out (which is rare). If she wants to go outside she can go out. She has enough space to trot around, nap, wander and nibble at leaves that fall into her yard, or come into her stall and sleep, eat, drink, etc.

    Being in the barn is her "happy space". She, too, was an OTTB, and for the first few years I had her off the track was absolutely bat sh** INSANE. People would ask me what she would do, and the answer was, "Everything." She reared, bucked, bolted, spun, spooked, stopped at fences, attempted to throw herself on the ground, the whole nine yards. After much trial and error, we figured out what program works best for her and I stick to it, no matter whether it is "fashionable" or "conventional" or what. It works for her and that's all that matters.

    A similar approach may work with this one- although it sounds like you have the under saddle part down! Try everything that is reasonable and use the results of these trials to guide what you try next. When you find what works, stick to it. Good luck!
    To me this is what I think when someone says a horse can't handle turnout. Truly, legitimately, anxious and asking to go home. A horse who happily plays too hard is a horse who isn't getting enough time to play in my mind.

    Quote Originally Posted by kookicat View Post
    I know she's rehabbing, but that's not really work. Can you add something in to tire her brain out?

    Could you try a different sedative?

    I have four fit TBs- two mares and two geldings. The girls aren't too bad, but sometimes I just have to walk away and not watch the boys.
    I used to have to turn away from my horse. Everyone else would talk about how spectacular he was to watch, but I'd just stand there feeling sick to my stomach as he ran. I also removed his hind boots because he was doing amazing sliding stops, and a 16.3 TB with relatively straight hind legs should not be doing that to his joints. It took two sliding stops and the resulting dirt burn on his fetlocks (first one just shortened the hair - second one was the one he felt) before he stopped that!
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  3. #23
    Join Date
    Nov. 10, 2005
    Location
    Va
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    I have a TB mare who has been naughty with turnout in the past. She would run, buck, rear and walk around on her hind legs, both in the paddock and on the lunge line when I would prep her for riding. She has lived on 24/7 turnout for a number of years now. Just this month I had to move to a new farm(old one closing). She was fine in turnout with her friend(who moved from other farm), but when I would take her out of the field, lots of hollering, spinning, etc. We had to leave them in a stall at night for about 5 days to acclimate them to much lusher pastures. I could barely ride her as she was so bad. Once back out on her 24/7 routine, she was back to normal. She is 19 this year and still acting like a nitwit without her pasture routine.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2004
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    Whidbey Is, Wash.
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    Quote Originally Posted by betsyk View Post
    Magnesium? lots and lots of it? only half kidding - my gelding is a much nicer guy with a huge dose of Remission and some sort of calming cookie that my friend buys for him...
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  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec. 9, 2012
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    210

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    What about a turnout situation where she's not out with other horses but on the other side of a fence as them? That way she's not in too much danger of hurting herself or another but she's also not alone?

    Besides that, I can only really think that the combination of being an OTTB and the injury rehab are making her a bit wonkers... That being said, she does sound very special to do all of this on ace!



  6. #26
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    Jan. 24, 2000
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    Aaannnddd ... no matter what you do, some horses are just silly in turnout. I keep waiting for my now 15yo to "settle down," but she is still pretty rambunctious. I am lucky enough to have my own place and to offer pretty much 24/7 turnout most of the time. The rowdy behavior is definitely more frequent and more extreme after a period of being stalled (even if just overnight, for instance) and reduced when she is out except for feeding, grooming, tacking, etc.
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