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  1. #1
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    Default French Guinea fowls for ticks eradication - anyone have them?

    Just pulled three (very) big, fat, juicy, disgusting ticks out of my poor filly's little tail. The day before was four. FOUR! Also pulled four out of my dog's neck, with one almost as big as my pinky. I can almost hear a waterfall splash when I stepped on that round belly of tick. Yike. That spurred me on to wage a new wave of tick war. This time, I'm thinking to try French Guinea fowls. They are supposed to grow faster, and have a bit of better instinct for survival. The ones we had (the normal guineas fowls) had a knack for getting themselves killed. Lost them all (total of grand 60 stupid guinea fowls raised from keets) within a year to a neighboring blood hound - that dog got rehomed somewhere, thank god. I'm hoping with the addition of my Maremma as guardian, plus a herd of smarter birds, we can at least get them to live past their first year and get the ticks under control. We get neighbor's herd of guineas fowls to roam part of our pasture but with the serious tick infestation they are not cutting it.

    Anyway, anyone has these french guinea fowls? Are they really smarter, or at least know better survival?
    Last edited by Gloria; May. 7, 2013 at 07:02 PM.



  2. #2
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    LOL!!!! Guinea Fowls are Guinea Fowls. I sincerely doubt that any Guinea Fowls of French heritage will be any different re: being smarter or less susceptible to predation than "regular" Guinea Fowls. Sorry, but too funny to even think there would be a difference.


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  3. #3
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    Well, they are supposed to grow faster, become larger, and thus tougher and less susceptible for predators. That is the logic anyway, and not in a totally non-sense way. Now whether that logic really pans out is what I'm trying to find out. To be honest, after losing sooooo many guineas fowls, I'm ready to try something... anything.

    Oh and they are not French heritage. They are still African heritage, but don't you know, selected by French to produce larger meat birds. Those French love to eat. lol.


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  4. #4
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    Tougher?? Against fox, coyotes, wolves, bear, hawks, owls, etc.?

    If you really believe that, I have a bridge I'd like to sell you.



  5. #5
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    Tougher in comparison to the common guineas fowls. I'm quite sure I never said tougher than fox, coyotes, wolves, bear, hawks, or owls - though I doubt one of those hawks or owls can carry off one of these birds. And I'm quite sure we don't have bear or wolves around. My livestock guardian dog can take care of foxes and wolves. Do you really need to get nasty for one simple question? Or you just have problem with French?


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  6. #6
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    Gloria, I had the same issue with chickens a few years back. I researched and purchased some Saipan Jungle Fowl as they were supposed to withstand predation better than say your ordinary backyard chickens. They have lasted. FWIW, it cannot hurt to try the French Guineas. Hopefully the addition of your dog will make the biggest difference this go around. Good Luck!


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  7. #7
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    Thanks, quarterhosre4me. I sure hope this time around I can finally get an upper hand. It was rather frustrating to raise a bunch of keets only to have they lost before reaching their first year. Umm need to convince my Maremma that these birds are in his jurisdiction too. He is dutiful guardian for my horses, sleeping outside of the foaling stall the first night my filly was born, and growling down another visiting neighboring dog (Aussi shepherd) when it tried to nip at my gelding's heels. Too bad we didn't get him when the blood hound was wrecking havoc in my yard.


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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gloria View Post
    Tougher in comparison to the common guineas fowls. I'm quite sure I never said tougher than fox, coyotes, wolves, bear, hawks, or owls - though I doubt one of those hawks or owls can carry off one of these birds. And I'm quite sure we don't have bear or wolves around. My livestock guardian dog can take care of foxes and wolves. Do you really need to get nasty for one simple question? Or you just have problem with French?
    Nasty? LOL! Good Lord girl, if you really thought my post was "nasty", I'd hate to see you come up against true "nasty". You must collapse into a heap - lol!!

    And what else besides predators do you expect your birds to be "tougher" against? Weather? Dandelion fluff? Lol!! If they're not "tougher" against any or all of the predators I mentioned (& I doubt they will be), then whether or not they're French (& no, I have nothing against "French" - lol!!!!), Italian, or Patagonian isn't going to make a whit of difference.

    You're a real hoot.


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  9. #9
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    Let's all agree to call them Freedom Fowl


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  10. #10
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    You know, Bacardi, some people can be humorous without being rude; the others, well, they are so accustomed to being nasty they don't see it when it is splashed on their faces. Seriously, go get some beauty sleep, Good Lord girl. Maybe you will wake up feeling better, or at least have a more logical crystal clear brain. That way, maybe, just maybe, you can at least attempt to read for comprehension.

    With that said, may I request you to keep your response within a "meaningful" realm? It is one thing to share experiences, quite another if you can't wait to start the customary nasty streak. I would like to see whether anyone has any experiences with these birds, good or bad; I'm not interested in meaningless cat fights, which you seem to particularly enjoy based on your posting history. Since this is a threat I started, I intend to keep it a bit more suited for mature discussion. Thank you.


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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hippolyta View Post
    Let's all agree to call them Freedom Fowl



  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hippolyta View Post
    Let's all agree to call them Freedom Fowl
    LOL!!! Works for me.


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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gloria View Post
    You know, Bacardi, some people can be humorous without being rude; the others, well, they are so accustomed to being nasty they don't see it when it is splashed on their faces. Seriously, go get some beauty sleep, Good Lord girl. Maybe you will wake up feeling better, or at least have a more logical crystal clear brain. That way, maybe, just maybe, you can at least attempt to read for comprehension.

    With that said, may I request you to keep your response within a "meaningful" realm? It is one thing to share experiences, quite another if you can't wait to start the customary nasty streak. I would like to see whether anyone has any experiences with these birds, good or bad; I'm not interested in meaningless cat fights, which you seem to particularly enjoy based on your posting history. Since this is a threat I started, I intend to keep it a bit more suited for mature discussion. Thank you.
    Oh for heaven's sake woman - lighten up. Otherwise you're going to be a complete mess the first time something picks off one of your "Freedom Fowl" - lol!!



  14. #14
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    Oh for heaven's sake woman - the first time someone picks off one of my "Freedom Fowl", he/she will meet my newly acquired gun. Snort.


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  15. #15
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    Not to be one to join the debate here but for what it's worth, I've watched Red Tail Hawks carry off adult chickens, which out weigh any guineas fowl. No problem, just snatch and go. And for owls, well, Great Horned owls can carry away cats and skunks (a favorite), so they can carry off your fowl too. They hunt by day and night when they have babies to feed, settle back to night feeding in summer when babies fledge, til next spring.


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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hippolyta View Post
    Let's all agree to call them Freedom Fowl
    My first thought was to make a joke about them being French, does it mean they give up without a fight?. Does that make me mean?
    "You can't blame other people. You can't always say what happened wasn't my fault, and you know what? Even if you have an excuse, shut up. "Bruce Davidson Sr.


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  17. #17
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    That means French love big fat birds, chism. lol. They selected bred and produced these giant guineas fowls for meat, hence "French".

    blue phlox farm, average chickens if I'm not mistaken weight 3~5 lb; these guinea fowls I'm referring to weight average of over 5 lb.

    They are also called "JUMBO" guineas fowls, if anyone prefer it.

    Nobody ever heard of these "French"/"JUMBO" guinea fowls? Scratching head....



  18. #18
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    Default

    Question: don't all birds eat ticks? Why the focus on guineas?
    If all do, then ducks geese and turkeys would be an option as well, right?



  19. #19
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    Oh - Bacardi is just being Bacardi - situation normal.
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique


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  20. #20
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    I said it before on the other thread, consider Muscovy ducks. They are large enough as adults that the hawks leave them alone and truly nothing really bothers mine. They eat a ton of bugs.



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