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  1. #1
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    Mar. 14, 2010
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    Default Selling a horse that is currently leased out--weird update

    I have a horse leased out right now--it is a monthly lease and either party can stop the lease with 30 days notice for any reason. I love the lessee's--but I find myself in the position where I need to sell the horse.

    I have contacted lessee's and offered to sell to them. They are unsure about the commitment and aren't sure they could afford him. They are also quite disappointed that they may not have him for the whole show season (which I feel bad about, but this is why I did a month to month lease, not say, a 12 month commitment).

    Has anyone done this before? I do not want to bring him home (I can, would rather not) while he is up for sale. He is in regular work with lessee and will be shown while there. If I bring him home, I can probably ride a little but don't have a ring. If anyone has done this, can you share details about it? Did buyers try horse out at lessees barn? Thanks!
    Last edited by AliCat518; May. 6, 2013 at 11:36 PM.
    Charlie Brown (1994 bay TB X gelding)
    White Star (2004 grey TB gelding)

    Mystical Moment, 1977-2010.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
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    Default

    If the ones leasing it won't buy it, how about, once this month is over, putting the horse on consignment with a carefully screened trainer that sells the kind your horse is?

    This way you won't have to keep the horse fit and showing it to any and all.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
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    Default

    I was really hoping to let him stay with the lessees for as much of show season as possible. (Teenage girl who leases will be heart broken if I pull him in the middle of their season!) but I do need to do what's best for me financially. Consignment is a great idea--how would I go about finding a trainer for that?
    Charlie Brown (1994 bay TB X gelding)
    White Star (2004 grey TB gelding)

    Mystical Moment, 1977-2010.



  4. #4
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    Default

    You could ask on the hunter/jumper forum who in your area knows of a good barn/trainer for that?
    Or go to shows and meet some, or ask your vet or farrier?



  5. #5
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    Nov. 13, 2002
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    Maryland
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    Default

    I did it as the person leasing the horse and it was not that complicated but we were all reasonable people so we simply agreed that they would ask me about setting up a time with the horse when they had someone interested and we would both try to be reasonable about when we would do it (I would be reasonable about not saying no when I could accomodate them and they would be reasonable about not doing it all the time and respecting when I had competitions or lessons scheduled). It was laid out this simply in the lease contract.
    In my case, they tried the horse at the barn I had her at, but only because it was okay by the BOs and they knew they had to sign a release.
    So your first step I would think would be to contact the person leasing your horse and ask if they are willing to accomodate requests to have someone try the horse. If they say no or they say yes and then are not reasonable about your requests, then simply end the lease that month and either take the horse home or put them in a training/consignment barn.
    If the horse has to be made available for other people to try him, I would expect a reduction in the lease fee.
    There is something about the outside of a horse that is good for the inside of a man.(Churchill)



  6. #6
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    Horse is free leased, so I don't think it would be a problem! I'm thinking consignment sounds like the best option...just feel terrible about the girl not being able to ride him during show season!
    Charlie Brown (1994 bay TB X gelding)
    White Star (2004 grey TB gelding)

    Mystical Moment, 1977-2010.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7

    Default

    How fast do you need to sell, exactly?

    If it's not ASAP, I'd let the lessor decide whether they want to keep leasing (knowing he's for sale) or would rather stop now and find another horse before show season gets too far along.

    If they want to keep leasing, redo the contract specifying how you'll work out all the potential buyer visits, PPEs, handling fees if the horse sells in the middle of the month, etc. For example, I'm not adverse to leasing a sale horse, but if I pay a month's board and the horse is sold before the end of the month, I'd expect the seller to refund me the balance of the board I paid. But there are no rules for this -- sort out whatever makes everyone happy.

    If you need to sell ASAP or there would be some issue with having buyers try the horse wherever he is now, then yes, you need to end the lease and move him to a situation where he can be shown properly.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 11, 2007
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    Central VA
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    Default

    Well, I know both parties here and am sad to hear this, but a few things come to mind. Can you offer to lease him to them for say the next 3 months for a fee? That way if show season is important, they could be "locked in" without spending a ton or being fully "committed" like they would buying? It would get some money in your pocket as well. Secondly, remember that just because you're selling doesn't mean anyone is going to be buying-- not to be a downer but my horse has been for sale for over two months and exactly two people have come and seen him (neither was a match.) Since you don't have the facilities to keep him in steady work, you're probably better off leaving him there or sending him to a consignment barn to sell. However, as I've found out, those barns are $$$ for board around here so now you're looking at spending a considerable amount each month still with no guarantees. Oh, and you have all the vet/farrier expenses again.

    The other thing you could do is tell their trainer that horse is for sale and that you'll pay her commission if she sells it. That could put her in a bad spot with her student, though.

    It's a hard spot to be in and honestly, I thought about free leasing my guy but figured the hassles wouldn't be worth it. (Mine is going to a trainer's barn this weekend so he will hopefully sell soon.)

    Good luck with whatever you decide, I'm sure you'll keep everyone's best interests at heart.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
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    Dec. 2, 2007
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    You could think about offering an incentive to the leaser for keeping him in work and showing him to potential buyers/allowing you to show him to potential buyers while still at the current barn. Say 5% ish. You would be spending at least that for a consignment barn anyway. Positives for you would that you would not be paying sale board while horse is at sale barn. Positives for them would being able to continue to ride and show a horse they enjoy until he's sold. And a token for their cooperation with the selling process.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KPF View Post
    Well, I know both parties here and am sad to hear this, but a few things come to mind. Can you offer to lease him to them for say the next 3 months for a fee? That way if show season is important, they could be "locked in" without spending a ton or being fully "committed" like they would buying? It would get some money in your pocket as well. Secondly, remember that just because you're selling doesn't mean anyone is going to be buying-- not to be a downer but my horse has been for sale for over two months and exactly two people have come and seen him (neither was a match.) Since you don't have the facilities to keep him in steady work, you're probably better off leaving him there or sending him to a consignment barn to sell. However, as I've found out, those barns are $$$ for board around here so now you're looking at spending a considerable amount each month still with no guarantees. Oh, and you have all the vet/farrier expenses again.

    The other thing you could do is tell their trainer that horse is for sale and that you'll pay her commission if she sells it. That could put her in a bad spot with her student, though.

    It's a hard spot to be in and honestly, I thought about free leasing my guy but figured the hassles wouldn't be worth it. (Mine is going to a trainer's barn this weekend so he will hopefully sell soon.)

    Good luck with whatever you decide, I'm sure you'll keep everyone's best interests at heart.
    I'm sad about it too. It's really the perfect free lease situation. Life is just throwing me some major curve balls right now and I need the money. That's a good idea about offering them a lease for a fee--I just feel bad doing that since they've been getting a free lease all this time! I've been open and honest with the lessees about this for over a month so hopefully they don't feel caught off guard.

    My only other option is to bring him home and keep him at a friends house down the road. She has a ring so I could keep him in work a few days a week and not pay board. She's also a pro, so I could have her do a few rides and give her commission. Oy, this isn't fun. Oh how I wish money grew on trees!!
    Charlie Brown (1994 bay TB X gelding)
    White Star (2004 grey TB gelding)

    Mystical Moment, 1977-2010.



  11. #11
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    Default

    So I updated lessee with the options I was considering. She got back to me quickly, stating that she had planned on calling me tomorrow to tell me she didn't think horse would work for them anymore. Apparently he is terrified of the donkeys that he has to pass to get to turnout and cannot handle it. She stated how awesome he has been under saddle but that he cannot behave while walking past the donkeys. She has offered to bring him back to me next weekend! I am not ready or equipped to bring a horse home right now. He may have to go to a consignment barn sooner than later.
    Charlie Brown (1994 bay TB X gelding)
    White Star (2004 grey TB gelding)

    Mystical Moment, 1977-2010.



  12. #12
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    Dec. 19, 2012
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    Default

    That's an, um, creative? excuse on the lessee's part. Hope you can find a spot for the horse!



  13. #13
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    Jun. 30, 2009
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AliCat518 View Post
    So I updated lessee with the options I was considering. She got back to me quickly, stating that she had planned on calling me tomorrow to tell me she didn't think horse would work for them anymore. Apparently he is terrified of the donkeys that he has to pass to get to turnout and cannot handle it. She stated how awesome he has been under saddle but that he cannot behave while walking past the donkeys. She has offered to bring him back to me next weekend! I am not ready or equipped to bring a horse home right now. He may have to go to a consignment barn sooner than later.
    a 30 Day Notice is usual in these situations ...
    unless they already have a replacement lined up, they would need to do a notice with the boarding barn - set up a return date that works for you as well as the leaser.
    Hopefully your friend is able to accommodate your horse.



  14. #14
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    If this is the horse I think it is, I bet you will have a buyer soon! Sorry to hear life is a challenge right now, I know how you feel. Hang in there!
    Sorry to see xtranormal is gone
    For funnies, search youtube for horseyninjawarrior!

    Www.caringbridge.org/visit/mysecretgarden



  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by alto View Post
    a 30 Day Notice is usual in these situations ...
    unless they already have a replacement lined up, they would need to do a notice with the boarding barn - set up a return date that works for you as well as the leaser.
    Hopefully your friend is able to accommodate your horse.
    Lessee has offered to keep him til early June. She's a very reasonable person, thankfully! I hope to have him back by the end of May.

    Quote Originally Posted by alittlegray View Post
    If this is the horse I think it is, I bet you will have a buyer soon! Sorry to hear life is a challenge right now, I know how you feel. Hang in there!
    Thanks alittlegray! I hope you're right! And I hope all is well with you
    Charlie Brown (1994 bay TB X gelding)
    White Star (2004 grey TB gelding)

    Mystical Moment, 1977-2010.



  16. #16
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    Whoops, duplicate. Apparently I have not yet mastered the multiquote.
    Last edited by AliCat518; May. 7, 2013 at 07:06 AM. Reason: Not enough coffee
    Charlie Brown (1994 bay TB X gelding)
    White Star (2004 grey TB gelding)

    Mystical Moment, 1977-2010.



  17. #17
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    We are just now hitting prime buying/selling season so this is actually the half full glass if it had to happen.

    IMO you need to get him into a high traffic barn where it's easy for buyers to see him and having a trainer really makes setting showing easy- they can prep him when you can't be there and be more available to set them up then you can be.

    But I would not leave him where he is for another month if he can't get to turnout or if your leasor has lost interest/found another project/is out of money. If he sits? He's going to back up training and appearance wise.

    Prime selling season ends mid August... Most sale barns do charge sale board, nobody takes them "on the cuff" for more then a few weeks if at all. If I were you I'd contact a few local trainers and see if they have anybody who would lease a sale horse month to month or could use him for lessons. It would get him where he has a better chance of selling, keep him in work and out of your wallet.

    If/when you have to sell? Gotta do what you gotta do.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.



  18. #18
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    Nov. 30, 2006
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    I think you really have to look at it from her pov. If I were leasing this horse I would feel like I was being used to pay for the horse's care until it sold. I wouldn't be happy and if I had been planning to show I would want the horse gone asap so I could find something else in time.

    If she kept the horse and allowed you to show it to potential buyers, how would you handle the 30 days notice if you sold the horse?

    IMO if you want to sell the horse, give her 30 days notice (from the 1st) and take the horse back.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
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    As I read OPs update, her leasor was going to call to return the horse because he was not working out, could not get past the donkeys to turnout or whatever the truth may be BEFORE being told OP needed to sell sooner then later. Something is not right with the lease situation and ending it early with consent on both sides might be in both the horse and OPs best interests and allow OP to actively market him ASAP.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.



  20. #20
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    Horse has been having trouble with the donkeys for a few weeks now. Leasor is happy to give him back any time in the next 30 days.

    Is it at all common for the lessor to require a vetting (paid for by the leasor) upon returning the horse? Ill have to check our contract to see if its covered. Horse had one accident during the lease and Was cleared by their vet but I want to be sure that he is of the same condition as when he left.
    Charlie Brown (1994 bay TB X gelding)
    White Star (2004 grey TB gelding)

    Mystical Moment, 1977-2010.



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