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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Jul. 30, 2008
    Location
    Sioux Falls, SD
    Posts
    1,451

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    Quote Originally Posted by PeteyPie View Post
    Did they test for this?:
    http://www.aaep.org/health_articles_...ly=true&id=190

    "Vesicular Stomatitis (VS) is a contagious disease that afflicts horses, livestock, wildlife and even humans. The disease is caused by a virus...

    "...When vesicular stomatitis occurs in horses, blister-like lesions develop on the tongue, mouth lining, nose and lips. In some cases, lesions also develop on the coronary bands, or on the udder or sheath. When VS is suspected, an exact diagnosis should be obtained by testing the blood for virus-specific antibodies. Testing is necessary to rule out the possibility that the lesions are caused by photosensitivity (sunburn), irritating feeds or weeds, or toxicity from non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications like phenylbutazone...

    "...There are still many questions regarding how vesicular stomatitis is transmitted. The disease is distributed only in North and South America, with a greater incidence in warmer regions. Due to the seasonal occurrence of VS during summer through early fall, it is believed that insects such as biting flies and gnats transmit the virus. Stable and houseflies are other possible but unlikely vectors. VS also seems to be passed from horse to horse by contact with saliva or fluid from ruptured blisters. Physical contact between animals, or contact with buckets, equipment, housing, trailers, feed, bedding or other items used by an infected horse can provide a ready means of spread..."
    VERY interesting. I will call and ask. They took quite a bit of bloodwork and are sending off some for metabolic testing, so if they didn't test it perhaps they still can. Or they can pull more blood before we pick her up!
    If you don't like something, change it. If you can't change it, change your attitude.
    ~ Maya Angelou


    2 members found this post helpful.

  2. #42
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2012
    Location
    East Coast
    Posts
    383

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    I worked for a year as a veterniary receptionist. Based off my training and the practice I worked out of, the secretary you spoke with had no right to treat your call in the manner she did. If a client calls with a question or wishing to speak directly to their vet, or they want an appointment sooner than would regularly be available, the only decision a secretary makes is: can this message wait for a couple hours until the vet is through their morning appointments? If not, can it wait until the vet is done with their current appointment? Or do I need to page them with an emergency phone call while the client stays on the line? That's all the decision making she has any right to do. And she should always err on the more cautiaus side. A good vet values their clients and their reputation. They want to take your phone calls, and they don't want secretaries dismissing their clients. With your phone call, she should have taken an extremely thorough message and delivered it to the vet immediately. It is the vet's responsibility to read her thorough message and call you back with the urgency they feel your message requires.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Mar. 20, 2011
    Posts
    430

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    I had a horse that used to choke. I would give her ace so she would drop her head and so she would not freak out. Then Banamine for the sore throat that followed. I had to soak the heck out of the hay and eventually switch to the special dengie.
    Eventually she grew out of it (immune system improved with age) and went back to eating wet hay.
    As for the vet- get the cell phone and text the vet. If you don't hear back, either call another vet or put the horse on the truck and go to the nearest clinic.



  4. #44
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 1999
    Location
    Mendocino County, CA: Turkey Vulture HQ
    Posts
    14,294

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    I am glad it worked out.

    I do recommend (for all of us, not just OP) paying attention to PeteyPie's advice. You don't have to try to explain or defend yourself about it, but really think about what you say and how it comes across. I have made this error myself with my own health and it proved to be very dangerous. This is why I've really learned to think carefully about what I say on those calls and to have as much quantitative and specific information as I can.
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket



  5. #45
    Join Date
    Apr. 20, 2011
    Posts
    12

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    We just had our VERY sensitive horse cast himself while he was colicing (post dentistry stress) and didn't find him until the morning. When we finally got him up it was very obvious this was not his normal I have a belly ache kind of thing he was violently ill. We called the vet and "he had a lot going on and would call in the afternoon if he could make it". (Mind you this is the vet himself as they dont have a receptionist, calls go to his cell) Called another vet who by some miracle came out despite the fact we haven't used him in about 8 years. The horse didn't make it and we never heard from our (now previous) vet.

    Hope you have made progress with your mare!



  6. #46
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    11,672

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    OP, did you talk to the vet about how their receptionist is dealing with clients? The vets should know so they can explain how things need to be done to their staff.



  7. #47
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Upper Midwest
    Posts
    5,635

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    That's what I was wondering too. Did you talk to one of them about the issues with the initial call? I really do think it is a good training opportunity.
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  8. #48
    Join Date
    Jul. 30, 2008
    Location
    Sioux Falls, SD
    Posts
    1,451

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    Yes, I talked to the vet but it was apparent she already knew - like I said she apologized a bunch of times without me even saying anything. It's very, very abnormal behavior for this clinic - which is why it was so drastic to me to even consider calling another (very competent) local vet!

    I'm blessed to have options, at least. I've only personally run into this treatment one other time with a different clinic/location and unfortunately that's the only local vet. We had an older (26+) year old quarterhorse that came into our rescue extremely emaciated. He had a rough winter, but was gaining and doing well. We came out one morning around 7:30 a.m. and he was obviously extremely ill, down, disorientated, etc. We were 95% sure he wouldn't make it, called the vet and expressed this to the receptionist - that it was an emergency, the horse was down and in severe distress, we believed we needed to euthanize - and got "well, the vet is in appointments all morning, I'll try to have him call you after lunch." Unacceptable. My mother and sister were local and dealing with him, and the clinic is less than 5 minutes from their home. After 2.5 hours and multiple calls begging the vet to come out, they called me in tears and asked me to see what I could do because I wasn't emotional and could be hardnosed but not "difficult", you know? I did ultimately get their attention and a "I'll send him out right away" when I called at 11:25 ... 4 hours after our initial "this horse is dying and we need a vet to euthanize" call ... by calling them up and saying "This horse is in severe pain, is now seizing, and this is inhumane to make him and us suffer. You need to get the vet out there RIGHT NOW to euthanize him." The receptionist FINALLY passed on the message and when she called back to say "the vet is leaving now" I unfortunately had to tell them that it was too late, he had finally passed. We had made frantic calls to every horse vet within 2 hours by then as well, but ultimately it was a horrible, horrible experience.
    If you don't like something, change it. If you can't change it, change your attitude.
    ~ Maya Angelou



  9. #49
    Join Date
    Jul. 25, 2003
    Location
    Boston Area
    Posts
    8,256

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    Wow does this make me appreciate my vet practice.

    The only time I really need them there NOW my horse was down and couldn't get up (he'd had odd symptoms for about a week which they were treating). I called my vet and he told me he would drop everything and be there as soon as he could He was there half an hour later and spent four hours at my barn until we could get my horse in the horse ambulance to Tufts.

    My horse didn't make it (had a blood clot by his poll) but it wasn't for lack of trying. It made me feel very loyal to this practice, too.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tif_Ann View Post
    I'm blessed to have options, at least. I've only personally run into this treatment one other time with a different clinic/location and unfortunately that's the only local vet. We had an older (26+) year old quarterhorse that came into our rescue extremely emaciated. He had a rough winter, but was gaining and doing well. We came out one morning around 7:30 a.m. and he was obviously extremely ill, down, disorientated, etc. We were 95% sure he wouldn't make it, called the vet and expressed this to the receptionist - that it was an emergency, the horse was down and in severe distress, we believed we needed to euthanize - and got "well, the vet is in appointments all morning, I'll try to have him call you after lunch." Unacceptable. My mother and sister were local and dealing with him, and the clinic is less than 5 minutes from their home. After 2.5 hours and multiple calls begging the vet to come out, they called me in tears and asked me to see what I could do because I wasn't emotional and could be hardnosed but not "difficult", you know? I did ultimately get their attention and a "I'll send him out right away" when I called at 11:25 ... 4 hours after our initial "this horse is dying and we need a vet to euthanize" call ... by calling them up and saying "This horse is in severe pain, is now seizing, and this is inhumane to make him and us suffer. You need to get the vet out there RIGHT NOW to euthanize him." The receptionist FINALLY passed on the message and when she called back to say "the vet is leaving now" I unfortunately had to tell them that it was too late, he had finally passed. We had made frantic calls to every horse vet within 2 hours by then as well, but ultimately it was a horrible, horrible experience.
    Equine Ink - My soapbox for equestrian writings & reviews.
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