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  1. #21
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    Jul. 30, 2008
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    Sioux Falls, SD
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    Just got a call back from Dr. J who agreed this all seems weird and she should be seen sooner rather than later. When I get home I will evaluate her current condition and if she's in distress, Dr. J will be coming out, otherwise we are taking her in tomorrow morning and leaving her at the vet. I feel so much better talking to her
    If you don't like something, change it. If you can't change it, change your attitude.
    ~ Maya Angelou


    9 members found this post helpful.

  2. #22
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    Mar. 11, 2012
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    48

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    Perhaps they think that since you have been dealing with this for a week now before calling a few more days won't be a problem?


    3 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23

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    IMO, if I couldn't reach my vet in a emergency (or potential emergency) situation I wouldn't hesitate to call another vet. his sounds like a choke or partial choke situation based on your description.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
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    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
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    Update?



  5. #25
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    Nov. 24, 2006
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    I also instantly thought it sounded like choke . I hope you were able to get someone to come out.
    Kerri


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Lexington, KY
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    Once again, thankful for my vet. I just call his cell directly unless it's after hours.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  7. #27
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    Oct. 10, 2007
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    down south
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    Yep sounds like choke, partial choke with possible pneumonia at this point with the breathing issues going on. Choke can make them aspirate in their lungs and develop pneumonia and if this has been going on this long I wouldn't doubt that.
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole


    2 members found this post helpful.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb. 4, 2009
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    NCC DE
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    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    Once again, thankful for my vet. I just call his cell directly unless it's after hours.
    Same here.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2002
    Location
    Virginia
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    3,447

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tif_Ann View Post
    Sending my sister out to check the gums and heart rate now. I'll be home in about an hour to get eyes on her myself. Her last update is that her breathing is back to normal, she stopped cribbing/pulling, and she seems more relaxed. Still "blowing drool bubbles" however. We did check the gums for dehydration on Saturday after the farrier used the pinch test, since the tackiness and color of the gums is a better indicator.

    Well, I wouldn't say the gums are the better indicator of hydration when the horse is drooling uncontrollably. Drool = wet AND drool = fluid loss. The horse has been "struggling for a little over a week" and you're wondering if you should be more persistent with the vet? I hope you had at least taken her temp and I hope she's seen a vet by now. I guess I'd better finish reading the thread.
    "Absent a correct diagnosis, medicine is poison, surgery is trauma and alternative therapy is witchcraft" A. Kent Allen
    http://www.etsy.com/shop/tailsofglory


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jul. 12, 2012
    Location
    San Diego County
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    I had one do something similar. The horse had a stick wedged across the upper jaw between the molars. He was just not right with the clear drool. trying to eat but slow and blah. Once vet came and popped the mouth open he found the stick up in there and pulled it out and the horse was better. The horse did need sedation to remove it. But, it would have been bad to wait 3 days for that. How he got the stick up there?...well who knows...but I would either be pretty straight forward with the receptionist, or call in another practice to help. Good luck!


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  11. #31
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    Feb. 23, 2005
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    Spotsylvania, VA
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    Quote Originally Posted by rizzodm View Post
    What color are the horses gums and what's the heart rate? You can check these yourself and report to the vet. Gums should be pale pink and heart rate should be 30-42 per min. You can feel the heart beat on the left side of the chest under the elbow, count beats for one minute.
    I would take her temp as well.
    Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.


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  12. #32
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    Jun. 7, 2002
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    Virginia
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    Quote Originally Posted by TullyMars View Post
    I had one do something similar. The horse had a stick wedged across the upper jaw between the molars. He was just not right with the clear drool. trying to eat but slow and blah. Once vet came and popped the mouth open he found the stick up in there and pulled it out and the horse was better. The horse did need sedation to remove it. But, it would have been bad to wait 3 days for that. How he got the stick up there?...well who knows...but I would either be pretty straight forward with the receptionist, or call in another practice to help. Good luck!
    And this one's already been waiting more than a week! I can't imagine not grabbing my Maglite and getting a good, thorough look AND feel up in the mouth of a horse that's drooling as the OP described. I was assuming this had been done at least, but now I'm not sure at all. OP, any update?
    "Absent a correct diagnosis, medicine is poison, surgery is trauma and alternative therapy is witchcraft" A. Kent Allen
    http://www.etsy.com/shop/tailsofglory



  13. #33
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    Jul. 30, 2008
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    Sioux Falls, SD
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    Update - mind you - she hadn't been emergent for over a week, just yesterday. It's not like she was standing out there 24/7 in an emergent situation - we just knew something wasn't quite right and had her scheduled to go in but yesterday she just really seemed bad. And yes, we had looked in her mouth as much as we could - looking for an abscessed tooth or something like that - but didn't see what it ended up being. Not sure if we could, as they found it with sedation and a speculum.

    She spent the day today at the vet. After sedating her, they opened up her mouth with the speculum and found that way back in her mouth, all along the top of her tongue (and a few underneath) were "erosions" as they called it. No idea where they came from. All three vets ended up coming in and looking at it. Basically said it looks like chemical burns, maybe from creosote or green treated wood, but there's really nothing like that anywhere that she could have gotten into; or blister beetles - but our vet said she has no other signs at this point of blister beetle toxicity and really it's not something you see in South Dakota AND none of our other horses have symptoms and are fed the same; but basically no idea what caused it. Also none of our other horses have anything like this going on. They did bloodwork, checked for an obstruction, etc. They did float her teeth while she was sedated. Her vitals were all normal, she didn't appear dehydrated today at all, but her tongue was a mess. So we have a "what" just not a "why". A sore tongue like that pretty much explains everything she was doing - the drooling, refusing a halter/bit, refusing to be caught, bucking, even the cribbing & pulling on the trough if she was trying to itch it. It's on the upside of healing and so she's just sending her home and we'll let it heal.

    So no answer as to WHY but at least we know what was wrong and it's not an obstruction or in her lungs, or anything life threatening at this point.
    If you don't like something, change it. If you can't change it, change your attitude.
    ~ Maya Angelou


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2005
    Posts
    500

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    Was she wormed recently? Zimectrin Gold has been known to cause mouth ulcers.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2011
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    So California
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tif_Ann View Post
    ...I know the secretary is just running interference. I know her job is to keep the schedule flowing and not bother the vets. But there has to be some kind of recognition of what is a potential emergency and what isn't. I was very clear on the phone - I basically said everything I've said here, including the "we don't call the vet unless we feel it's an emergency."
    I read through the posts and see you have this resolved, but I wanted to comment that it is not the job of the secretary or the vet to decide what is or is not an emergency. You decide. Then, once you've determined that you need a vet out today, you communicate that in no uncertain terms. If you were as diffident with the secretary as you are in the verbiage of your posts here, it is no wonder she put you off.. I don't mean to sound harsh, but to give you constructive criticism. Also, you sound like me: an over-explainer. It just gets me into trouble and muddies the message.

    So instead of saying, "we don't call the vet unless we feel it's an emergency," I think you should simply say, "It's an emergency. I'll hold the phone while you find out when someone will be here." If she asks what you think the problem is, give the worst-case scenario that you are concerned about: "I'm worried that he may have been poisoned." In that situation, if she were to give you the runaround, I would definitely call another vet. It really is a good idea to have two vets anyway, in case your regular clinic is short staffed and tied up in other emergencies.

    I want to add that you don't need to second-guess yourself. It seems that you have enough experience with your horses and with past veterinary calls that if you have the rare over-reaction, it will be forgiven. It is enough that the symptoms fit more serious and deadlier conditions than what resulted.

    I recently had one of those emergency calls which turned out to be no big deal. My horse came up three-legged lame and I was convinced she had broken her leg or dislocated her hip. The vet hoof-tested her and then blocked her foot to find out the pain source and diagnosed a probable abscess, which sure enough, erupted a few days later. She had never had an abscess and was so dramatic in her presentation that I thought the worst. The thing is, I do not regret for a minute that I called, because if it had been some awful thing, I would never have forgiven myself if I had let her suffer.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Jul. 25, 2003
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    Boston Area
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    Glad you were able to reach your vet and she was seen promptly. I would still let your vet know that you had trouble getting through. I use the main number at my vet practice for scheduling but in an emergency/serious situation I usually call one of the vets directly.

    I'm grateful that our vets give out their cell numbers because sometimes just talking to them quickly can really help.
    Equine Ink - My soapbox for equestrian writings & reviews.
    EquestrianHow2 - Operating instructions for your horse.



  17. #37
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    Feb. 25, 2011
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    So California
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tif_Ann View Post
    Update... ...After sedating her, they opened up her mouth with the speculum and found that way back in her mouth, all along the top of her tongue (and a few underneath) were "erosions" as they called it. No idea where they came from. All three vets ended up coming in and looking at it. Basically said it looks like chemical burns, maybe from creosote or green treated wood, but there's really nothing like that anywhere that she could have gotten into; or blister beetles - but our vet said she has no other signs at this point of blister beetle toxicity and really it's not something you see in South Dakota AND none of our other horses have symptoms and are fed the same; but basically no idea what caused it...
    How weird. Horses get the darndest things. Please update if you ever figure it out.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2011
    Location
    So California
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    Did they test for this?:
    http://www.aaep.org/health_articles_...ly=true&id=190

    "Vesicular Stomatitis (VS) is a contagious disease that afflicts horses, livestock, wildlife and even humans. The disease is caused by a virus...

    "...When vesicular stomatitis occurs in horses, blister-like lesions develop on the tongue, mouth lining, nose and lips. In some cases, lesions also develop on the coronary bands, or on the udder or sheath. When VS is suspected, an exact diagnosis should be obtained by testing the blood for virus-specific antibodies. Testing is necessary to rule out the possibility that the lesions are caused by photosensitivity (sunburn), irritating feeds or weeds, or toxicity from non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications like phenylbutazone...

    "...There are still many questions regarding how vesicular stomatitis is transmitted. The disease is distributed only in North and South America, with a greater incidence in warmer regions. Due to the seasonal occurrence of VS during summer through early fall, it is believed that insects such as biting flies and gnats transmit the virus. Stable and houseflies are other possible but unlikely vectors. VS also seems to be passed from horse to horse by contact with saliva or fluid from ruptured blisters. Physical contact between animals, or contact with buckets, equipment, housing, trailers, feed, bedding or other items used by an infected horse can provide a ready means of spread..."
    Last edited by PeteyPie; May. 7, 2013 at 06:59 PM. Reason: quotation marks


    5 members found this post helpful.

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2010
    Location
    Milton, FL
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    517

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    I'm glad it's "nothing serious." Even though, it's really weird.

    On the secretary thing... My first thought was, "oh HELL no." I've been really lucky to have awesome receptionists at our clinic here and in Washington. The "too busy" to call a client back is unacceptable, especially in an emergent situation.

    Hopefully, that's the most stress you and your sister have to go through for a long time.
    Steppin Not Dragon "Bella"
    Top Shelf "Charlie"
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  20. #40
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    Jul. 30, 2008
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    Sioux Falls, SD
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    No, not recently dewormed. Dewormed in February with simple Ivermectin, they are all due for the next rotation right now but we've held off due to her issues.

    I over-explain online a lot. I figure you guys don't know me, so I have to give details. I wasn't nearly as explainy or upset on the phone with the secretary. I literally called and said "This is soandso, I'm calling back regarding Jazz, and I need to speak with a vet. It's an emergency and I am not comfortable waiting until Thursday without speaking to a vet." That's when I got the "two are on calls, one is in appointments, there is really no time for them to call you, didn't I speak to your sister about this already?" and my response at the time was that she would leave a message for Dr. J and if I didn't hear back within an hour I would be calling back even if it was after hours. So .... not quite as bad here. And I didn't even have to explain it to the vet herself. She called me shortly after 5:00 and apologized multiple times. She had no idea what was going on, in fact, the secretary didn't even leave a list of symptoms or which horse I was calling about, just to call me. Luckily the vet knows me, knows when we call it's for a reason, so she called.

    Because of the way the secretary responded - NOT the vets - that's why I was upset and freaking out. I knew something weird was going on and I knew she needed to be seen. There was no way we were going to just sit on it after the way she was acting yesterday for another three days. Luckily it appears to be resolving but it obviously could have been much worse.
    If you don't like something, change it. If you can't change it, change your attitude.
    ~ Maya Angelou


    1 members found this post helpful.

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