The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 48
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    557

    Default

    This is not going to be a popular opinion but I never understood why horses and dogs are considered a natural pairing. I can't even count the number of times my horse has been spooked, chased, barked at, growled at, tripped, and pestered by people's dogs. Just yesterday someone brought a small lab puppy on a leash to the barn and it almost got stepped on by a horse who was being led in from the ring. I'm sure most dogs are well-behaved, but I (and I'm pretty sure my horse) prefer barn cats...
    The wind of heaven is that which blows between a horse's ears. ~ Arabian Proverb


    8 members found this post helpful.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2007
    Location
    California
    Posts
    4,164

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by piccolittle View Post
    This is not going to be a popular opinion but I never understood why horses and dogs are considered a natural pairing. I can't even count the number of times my horse has been spooked, chased, barked at, growled at, tripped, and pestered by people's dogs. Just yesterday someone brought a small lab puppy on a leash to the barn and it almost got stepped on by a horse who was being led in from the ring. I'm sure most dogs are well-behaved, but I (and I'm pretty sure my horse) prefer barn cats...
    I'm with you on this one.... there was a loose dog at a "A" horse show and it was running up and down the barn isle biting at the horses noses that were hanging over the stall doors. My new horse has not been around dogs much and was a bit startled by the behavior. I was wondering which horse was going to get a torn nostril from this!

    Several times at the public facility by my house while horses are loose in the rings off leash dogs will chase them. One of my horses kicked at one of the dogs and cut his leg open. Cost me over 500.00 in vet bills. I tell people now that my horse will kick your dog and it will die. Another loose dog attacked my dog as I was walking him on a leash. It was very scary.

    I guess my phobia has been created by the situations I have seen take place. Animals are unpredictable and we must do what we can to keep everyone as safe as possible.
    "The horse should pay attention to two things only: the rider’s aids and his own self-preservation at the jump—not the environment. ~ GM

    I want George to have this conversation with my horses!!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2002
    Location
    between the barn and the pond
    Posts
    14,495

    Default

    I witnessed a horse getting loose at a barn and ripping through the paddock off the back of the barn, tripping over a staked out goat. RIP, Missy. Goat never knew what hit her.

    I like my dogs. I would never tie one in a barn aisle. Or paddock.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep. 27, 2000
    Location
    Southern California - on a freeway someplace
    Posts
    10,131

    Default

    I saw a dog on a leash get tangled up with a horse. It wasn't pretty, but both escaped with minor injuries. The incident catalyzed the telling of stories where it didn't end well for either party, including a severed tendon on a horse's leg.

    A trainer used to tie her dogs in the aisle so that you'd either have to lead the horse over the leash or walk all the way around. I always walked all the way around.

    Overall, I'd rather have one on a leash than loose, especially if it's tied so it's not in the way. Especially after yesterday when we had:

    • A dog who belonged to someone who brought a horse on trial chase the barn cat up a tree where he meowed plaintively for several hours before we got a ladder and rescued him
    • A dog belonging to one of the trainers who growled at one person and then at a visiting dog. Said dog also tries to herd the horses.
    • The second dog then chased a horse (one of the ones brought in by the other dog owner) who got loose. The horse ended up running up a steep hill to the BO's house, down her paved driveway, and then down the relatively quiet street.


    This is at a barn with a "no dogs except the ones that live here" policy but some trainers dogs are counted as residents, including the ones who steal lunches and hide them.

    So, at the moment I am not a huge fan of dogs at the barn.
    The Evil Chem Prof


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 2012
    Location
    La La Land
    Posts
    939

    Default

    Actually it is a tuff call as to which is worse. Story after story of the loose dog did this,


    and this happened to the dog that was tied. I personally dont understand why anyone would think it was a good idea to bring the dog.
    my loose dog stories...
    1 trainers loose dogs chew up other riders real expensive riding gloves.
    2 boarders dog pees on other boarders dressage saddle and bridle
    3 a while back say 5-6 years perhaps longer as I am not a spring chicken anymore, an equine disease was being spread from barn to barn via the dogs. The virus mutated jumped species and everyone thinks its such a good idea to drag Fido along, and walah you have a bunch of sick horses.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2005
    Location
    between the mountains and the sea, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,936

    Default

    ^Hulk, what disease? In all my years of boarding/riding at barns where there are multiple dogs all over the place I've never heard about this.

    My dog comes to the barn per trainers permission. When I am riding or there are too many people around and/or too much going on she is confined in a stall or the office/lounge area. She is quiet even when confined (trainer has been known to forget she's there, lol), doesn't bother anyone when loose, gets along with the barn dogs, and does not go anywhere near the horses.
    "Choose to chance the rapids, and dare to dance the tides" - Garth Brooks
    "With your permission, dear, I'll take my fences one at a time" - Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2010
    Posts
    1,993

    Default

    Our barn dog is loose and I have no problem with her. She's mild mannered, knows to keep away from the horses, and is sweet. Never a problem.

    But...(of course there's always an exception!)....I have a fellow boarder who is a total nut case. I don't care for how she handles her horses (much yelling, yee hawing, and pretty much a total lack of horse sense) and I really don't like her dog. I was trying to ride one night and she was acting her usual dumb a$$ self on horseback with her badly behaved dog running along behind her. Ya know, my horse and I have already had one traumatic event this year in the arena (horse running through with stall door around her neck) and I am *just. not. in. the. mood.* for another trip to the ER. When the crazy started, I just went to the middle of the arena and got off. And solemnly swore to myself that if I ever saw her riding again I just wouldn't even bother. Fortunately she doesn't ride much.

    This is a long winded way of saying that I think people need to keep their dogs at home.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2010
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    200

    Default

    I think bringing a dog to a boarding barn or shows is dangerous, a lot of things can go wrong (dog gets loose, etc) even if the dog(s) are tied up. I own a dog and don't bring mine to the barns I visit or ride at.

    A month ago I was a h/j clinic at a barn, and the barn owners dog got loose while two girls was jumping. I grabbed the dog and kept him with me for a good 45 minutes until the owner got him (mind you he was very strong and I was trying to protect my DSLR camera). I was upset because I was there as a photographer, not a dog sitter.
    We could all take a lesson from crayons some are sharp, some are beautiful, some have weird names, and all are different colors, but they still learn to live in the same box. Unknown.



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Sep. 21, 2009
    Location
    Queens, NY
    Posts
    1,546

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Isabeau Z Solace View Post
    I really cannot stand this. Why do people do this? It is just

    dumb.

    And dangerous.

    Full disclosure, I do NOT own a dog. I am 'fur auntie' to my farm owners pack of designer beasties. But they all get the privilege of free roaming, and most never get taught to really tie or go on a leash even.... So perhaps I am spoiled by dog care scenarios where tying up is not necessary.

    But still. Going to a busy horse stable and tying your dog up in the aisle while you float teeth, trim horses, ride or teach is just a dangerous, dumb, inconsiderate, asinine thing to do.

    So if you do it, tell me why. And what do you plan to do when someone trips over your dog's leash in the aisle? Or the dog + leash get tangled in a horse's legs?
    It's ridiculous and should be against stable policy, and I agree with Sparkette and Oldernewbie that boarders shouldn't be bringing their dogs at all, that too much could go wrong.

    JFTR -- I enjoy well-behaved, free-roaming dogs on anybody's property, equine-related or not. I like to be greeted by dogs I also think this kind of life is optimum for the dog. All the Amish/Mennonite farms that we deal with have dogs wandering around, it is an atmosphere you don't get much in NYC.

    We used to have some legendary stable dogs at the carriage stables - till the RARAs kept making complaints that they were at liberty, sometimes wandering out onto the sidewalk. When they went, none were ever replaced, every stable is dogless now
    VP Horse & Carriage Association of NYC

    https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-F...ref=ts&fref=ts



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Nov. 28, 2006
    Location
    Transitioning
    Posts
    690

    Default

    I bring my dog to the barn and tie her all the time. We're working with a trainer to get her heeling and recall better but right now she needs to be tied.

    That said...

    I have my horses at home

    When I've been at boarding barns it drives me crazy and Bells stays at home!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2012
    Posts
    282

    Default

    It's sad that so many people don't have horse sense and ruin it for everyone else. I always think my dogs at horribly behaved, but every.single.person Ive met compliments me on their manners. It's not hard to instill a simple sit/stay/down and demand respect and attention out of them.



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 2012
    Location
    La La Land
    Posts
    939

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Event4Life View Post
    ^Hulk, what disease? In all my years of boarding/riding at barns where there are multiple dogs all over the place I've never heard about this.

    My dog comes to the barn per trainers permission. When I am riding or there are too many people around and/or too much going on she is confined in a stall or the office/lounge area. She is quiet even when confined (trainer has been known to forget she's there, lol), doesn't bother anyone when loose, gets along with the barn dogs, and does not go anywhere near the horses.
    Yah know Im old so I dont remember exactly, but it happened around 2006 the harder I think back. It was one of the diseases covered by the 4 way shot, I really dont remeber which one. But I do remeber that even some vaccinated horses were getting it, and this happened in NY state. I was unaffected at the time because I breed some mares at the time and had a closed herd with major biosecurity practices in place.(yup I am a major control freak) I worked for a vet for 20 years now retired, and he gave me the bullitin he recieved, about the issue as he knows how I fret. We are still very close friends and he still gives me heads up on such matters, thank goodness.



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2009
    Location
    Area 51
    Posts
    1,824

    Default

    Why bring dogs to the barn anyways? Leave the mutts at home!
    I LOVE my Chickens!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2012
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    6,248

    Default

    http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/sh...DATE-Page-2!¤

    My dog just suffered an open skull fracture from a kick to the head (no, he wasn't tied in the aisle) but this experience has opened not only my checking account by my eyes as well...dogs and horses shoudn't be together. A dog tied in an aisle could still suffer a kick to the head should a horse that is walking by decide that he doesn't care for said dog.

    Safer for everyone if the dogs just stay home, in a vehicle (provided the temperatures are safe) or in a stall. Staying home is probably the best option.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Aug. 26, 2008
    Posts
    2,086

    Default

    The worst part about tying a dog is that it means the owner is, for some reason, NOT MINDING IT. The same owner that felt the dog needed to accompany her to wherever she was going. Though she knew full well that she wouldn't be able to give her full attention to the dog. It's an annoying move, because there is an implicit expectation that SOMEONE ELSE will be providing the dog with attention/stimulus while the owner fritters off to do something for herself.

    I tell people now that my horse will kick your dog and it will die.
    I do this. It's true. I don't want your dogs near my horse. Barns where the dogs are "ok" have loose dogs around that exhibit sense around horses...and those dogs are pretty darn careful around my mare. I have absolutely no doubt that she would kill a dog with one well-placed, size 8 hoof.

    With my other horse, I know that a "bad" dog would be very likely to cost me thousands in vet bills. I despise people who bring unwelcome dogs to places where I ride my horse...like the two loose ones that someone insisted come on a group trail ride (not really per our group's policy...everyone is supposed to agree on particular dogs accompanying us...these awesome owners didn't ask and insisted loudly that the dogs were coming, they couldn't stay at the campsite) who "playfully" ran at my horse and slipped through the group directly behind his hocks. No way was I sitting THAT buck and bolt through the trees. I'm glad he wasn't hurt.

    Lots of people's dogs are fine around horses, I don't mind seeing them at shows, but it's not like I can fathom a specific set of rules that would effectively prevent morons from bringing awful dogs to these events...so I much prefer a "no outside dogs" policy. It drives me nuts at shows to listen to whining JRT tied in aisles, yapping and yelping while I'm trying to prep my horse...the owners NEVER seem to be in the barn. If you must bring your dog somewhere, could you please keep him WITH YOU? If you're going to have your hands full, then LEAVE THE DOG HOME.
    Lifestyle coordinator for Zora, Spooky, Wolfgang and Warrior



  16. #36
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2009
    Posts
    5,217

    Default

    I'm always surprised at how many people seem to think that their dogs are safe at the barn because the dog is "good with horses." Let me tell you, there are horses that are NOT good with dogs, and no matter how good the dog is, the dog won't be safe around horses.

    My horse is this way. He dislikes all small animals. His dislike is deep and sincere. There is zero doubt in my mind that he would kill a small animal (cat or dog). I personally think it all started because he was terrorized by a pit bull when he was a three year old, but really maybe he would have been this way no matter what. But, yeah, he will charge off a dog or a cat and he means it. I'm very careful with him around small animals (I love cats and some dogs, and would feel terrible if he ever injured or killed one). But, you know, barns really ARE for horses and this isn't really the kind of thing you can train out of a horse (nor can you control the horse at all times - for example, when it is turned out or in its stall).


    2 members found this post helpful.

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2008
    Location
    now in KCMO, and plan to stay there
    Posts
    3,251

    Default

    I was already planning to leave a boarding stable for some other unsatisfactory issues, but in the last few weeks I was there, there were some odd dog-related occurrences. One was dog tied in the hay area, was playing in and scattering hay, and I thought that was of concern. I was chastised by barn manager later for daring to mention to the stall cleaner whose dog it was, that I did not think that was an appropriate place for the dog. Next, a larger dog apparently also belonging to one of the workers was on a very long cable tie at the end of the aisle, right where the barn aisle ends at the gate to the indoor arena. That was very hazardous, and I was the only one who had any concern about that. I was so glad I was already planning on leaving. (of course the place I went to has some issues that the owners were not upfront about when telling me about their barn, but that is another problem that I think I can deal with for awhile....sigh...)
    Jeanie
    RIP Sasha, best dog ever, pictured shortly before she died, Death either by euthanasia or natural causes is only the end of the animal inhabiting its body; I believe the spirit lives on.



  18. #38
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2012
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    6,248

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FineAlready View Post
    I'm always surprised at how many people seem to think that their dogs are safe at the barn because the dog is "good with horses." Let me tell you, there are horses that are NOT good with dogs, and no matter how good the dog is, the dog won't be safe around horses.

    My horse is this way. He dislikes all small animals. His dislike is deep and sincere. There is zero doubt in my mind that he would kill a small animal (cat or dog). I personally think it all started because he was terrorized by a pit bull when he was a three year old, but really maybe he would have been this way no matter what. But, yeah, he will charge off a dog or a cat and he means it. I'm very careful with him around small animals (I love cats and some dogs, and would feel terrible if he ever injured or killed one). But, you know, barns really ARE for horses and this isn't really the kind of thing you can train out of a horse (nor can you control the horse at all times - for example, when it is turned out or in its stall).
    THIS is exactly how my gelding is, the same gelding that just gave my dog an open skull fracture. In fact, my pooch is resting in his crate now, after $5000 worth of hospitalization and surgeries. Hopefully he makes a full recovery, but honestly, we are surprised the dog is not dead. The hospital was surprised the dog was not dead. He easily could have been.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  19. #39
    Join Date
    Nov. 25, 2007
    Posts
    299

    Default

    Would anyone ever think of taking a horse to a dog show? Why do so many take dogs to horse shows?!



  20. #40

    Default

    dogs and horses are both compainion animals to humans, so I think it is fairly inevitible that they will have occasion to mix. i too would rather have a dog leashed and tied, than running loose. when i bring my dog to the barn, i tie her, but not in the barn aisle, so i am not sure i other people consider me inconsiderate etc.



Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 22
    Last Post: Apr. 8, 2013, 01:41 PM
  2. How do you organize your barn aisle?
    By spacytracy in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: Dec. 17, 2012, 05:22 AM
  3. Brick barn aisle
    By Huntin'Fool in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: Oct. 17, 2011, 04:18 PM
  4. Turning a shed row barn into a center aisle barn??
    By JenRose in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: Jul. 21, 2010, 09:01 PM
  5. Barn Aisle Width
    By luvs2ridewbs in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 34
    Last Post: Mar. 2, 2009, 09:36 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •