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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2012
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    Fern Creek, KY
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    Chisamba, you go! What an inspiring story!

    My Willow FINALLY cantered off under saddle with no drama. Just picked it up and went around like it was no big deal. It felt uh-mazing! Who knew I'd have to wait until she was almost 9 for her to grow up? I'm so glad that I stuck out the less than wonderful past few months. She's even starting to acknowledge my presence when I walk into the barn with a nicker, or whinny if she's out. Makes my heart happy.
    Quote Originally Posted by MistyBlue View Post
    I prefer them outside playing as opposed to standing in the barn aisle playing "I can crap more than you"
    New Year, New Blog... follow Willow and I here.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2006
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    8,602

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    I just as in 15 seconds ago procured the last of the USEF/USDF/horse memberships I will need to try to get my bronze scores next month (provided the show can give me different judges so that the scores count).

    The horse and I have been taking crazy lessons where we run through the coefficients of First 1, First 2, Second 2, Third 1 and Third 2 all in a zoom, the dressage trainer I am sure thinks I have lost my mind entirely, it is quite possible that I have, the horse is like please God not another simple change, upon which I promptly respond "it is two minutes later and third now so now please lead change! lead change!", other students of trainer hang out to watch the "half hour trip (and/or "flail") through the levels" every Sunday with some amusement, and hopefully in a month we can return to our regularly scheduled program of not being crazy people and perhaps, I don't know, chill out for a second.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May. 13, 2009
    Location
    Connecticut
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    263

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    My horse is taking a short break from competition while being treated for Lyme, but my 9 year old daughter rode in her first dressage schooling show this last weekend at Intro A. She placed 5th with a 57.188%. The school horse she rode cantered at M instead of trotting (which she had never done on him before), so after a long side of panic in the canter, he came back to her and they continued. She was in tears by the end, of course, but after multiple praises from everyone at the show and a pretty pink ribbon, she is all set to tackle this again. It was a great day! Very hard to be a show mom
    Mirror Image 2001-2007


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug. 26, 2008
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    1,763

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    Started riding my old horse in lessons a few weeks ago, and last night broke through on "shoulder fore"...I was so proud. He was nonplussed.

    We've been working on leg yield and shoulder-in all winter in lessons, and I've ridden a bunch of different horses, I have trouble figuring out when I've got "enough" bend, so I keep asking and end up collapsing into a turn. I was getting leg yield, and sometimes a real shoulder-in, but my instructor always had to tell me when I had it...and it was pretty awkward feeling.

    My good old Chuckwagon horse doesn't let you do that, he just curls his neck more, and more and more if you don't recognize when you "had it"...so when I settled into the "just right" balance of ask-and-bend, he did some beautiful strides of real shoulder fore, and I TOTALLY NOTICED. Since it is more subtle than either leg yield or shoulder-in, I was extra proud.

    I started thinking about actually doing a real Dressage test this summer! With a real judge! Holy moly!
    Lifestyle coordinator for Zora, Spooky, Wolfgang and Warrior


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Oct. 13, 2006
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    3,505

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    I think my biggest achievement is just a fun show attitude these days Im finally that lady smiling and shrugging off a bad test or green sillies. I always watched gals do that and wondered how do they not have those gritted teeth angry looks I always have! lol
    ~~Member of the TB's Rule Clique ~~
    http://www.off-breed-dressage.blogspot.com/


    4 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2000
    Location
    California
    Posts
    8,133

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    I love all these stories, and Chisamba, yours is especially inspiring. I admire your perseverance!

    My recent little victories are lateral work - SI and HI - and prompter transitions.

    But my big victory is just looking back to when I got my mustang three years ago. He didn't know how to steer, he didn't know what leg meant, he was very laterally unbalanced. Heck, I didn't know if we'd ever be able to canter without falling over, let alone canter in a balanced circle. And now he's forward and responsive and light and he understands my aids and we mostly ride in balance for the level where we're at. I'm so happy with his progress and have really enjoyed the ride(s)!
    My Mustang Adventures - Mac, my mustang | Annwylid D'Lite - my Cob filly

    "A horse's face always conveys clearly whether it is loved by its owner or simply used." - Anja Beran


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2012
    Location
    MS Gulf Coast
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    589

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    I had another small victory on Monday evening. I was cantering Criss (a bit fussy, but not terrible) and next thing I know, he trips really bad with his back legs. I thought we were going down. He saved both of us and kept on going. I circle back around at a trot to see a HUGE hole in the ring where he tripped!

    Luckily we're both fine. After I was done riding, I got off and stuck my whip in the hole just to see how deep/big it is. It was easily half way up my whip. Oy.

    Not the first time a hole has mysteriously opened up in the ring. The area was pine forest a long time ago and at some point, the old roots rot away and leave voids in the earth underneath the surface layer.



  8. #28
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    Oct. 21, 2003
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    8,675

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    Little victories? My 4 year old did a spectacular spin and bolt and I did not fall off. The best part? She went right back to work, still a little scared of the invisible monster in the corner of the arena, but still went to work with no snorting, tail in the air, or extreme tension.

    And on the ground, she has finally stopped running me over when she gets scared. We are almost to the point where she is respecting my space.

    Oh, and I think she might actually be starting to maybe like me just a little bit. It's hard to tell with Her Royal Highness


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by LadyNeon01 View Post
    I had another small victory on Monday evening. I was cantering Criss (a bit fussy, but not terrible) and next thing I know, he trips really bad with his back legs. I thought we were going down. He saved both of us and kept on going. I circle back around at a trot to see a HUGE hole in the ring where he tripped!

    Luckily we're both fine. After I was done riding, I got off and stuck my whip in the hole just to see how deep/big it is. It was easily half way up my whip. Oy.

    Not the first time a hole has mysteriously opened up in the ring. The area was pine forest a long time ago and at some point, the old roots rot away and leave voids in the earth underneath the surface layer.
    i find the idea of that kind of scary!



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Oct. 4, 2003
    Location
    Hurdle Mills, NC
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    Chisamba, thank you for sharing your story. I'm thinking it must have been very hard for you to remember it as you wrote, as I was moved to tears just reading it. I hope many of us will, indeed, remember it, allow it to help us keep our own little problems in perspective, and remind us to have empathy for others because we never know what they may have endured to put them where we see them. Your story reminds me of what my DBT (Dialectical Behavioral Therapy) instructor said: "Be compassionate to others because we are all engaged in a life and death struggle whether we know it or not. The only people who have not experienced tragedy are those who have not lived long enough."

    Congratulations for rising from the ashes to be such an inspiration, and good luck continuing to move up with those happy horses!



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Oct. 7, 2012
    Location
    Somewhere out there
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    177

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    I can mount my husbands eventer without him bolting, bucking or rearing now! He's gone from having to have 2 people hold him to now standing still until both feet are in the stirrups.

    However we're still trying to get over the whole "Just because I breathed doesn't mean it's a signal to go faster."

    And on another good note my little real dressage guy has gone from a 5/5 in the walk lameness to now a 1/5 lame in the trot. Counting down the days until he can come home from the vet clinic


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by fish View Post
    Chisamba, thank you for sharing your story. I'm thinking it must have been very hard for you to remember it as you wrote, as I was moved to tears just reading it. I hope many of us will, indeed, remember it, allow it to help us keep our own little problems in perspective, and remind us to have empathy for others because we never know what they may have endured to put them where we see them. Your story reminds me of what my DBT (Dialectical Behavioral Therapy) instructor said: "Be compassionate to others because we are all engaged in a life and death struggle whether we know it or not. The only people who have not experienced tragedy are those who have not lived long enough."

    Congratulations for rising from the ashes to be such an inspiration, and good luck continuing to move up with those happy horses!
    thank you,

    It is a personal failing of mine to be too critical. It takes significant effort for me to evaluate the positive. It does me good to be reminded, from time to time, that each person experiences significant tragedy and that it watching how they overcome is far more enlightening then seeing what they do "wrong".

    I dont know if i will ever get it right, sigh



  13. #33
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    Oct. 4, 2003
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    Hurdle Mills, NC
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    Quote Originally Posted by chisamba View Post
    thank you,

    It is a personal failing of mine to be too critical. It takes significant effort for me to evaluate the positive. It does me good to be reminded, from time to time, that each person experiences significant tragedy and that it watching how they overcome is far more enlightening then seeing what they do "wrong".

    I dont know if i will ever get it right, sigh
    Trying to "get things right" has got to be the central problem of living-- which means, I think, that giving and receiving criticism is a necessary part of living-- and not necessarily antipathetic to empathy at all. See, for example: http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2012...ackle-learning

    One of the things I've noticed after experiencing a few catastrophes myself, though, is how many times many people (including myself), bring further problems upon themselves (e.g. vehicle accidents) as a result of being distraught over difficulties elsewhere. Personally, I think it would be nice if people would keep that possibility in mind before losing their tempers over things that are obviously accidents. There is, IMO, a big difference between criticism, which can and should be useful, and beating up on people who are already quite aware and sorry that they've done something wrong.



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Apr. 22, 2006
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    1,331

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    Two weeks ago I moved my gelding to the barn where DD has her horse so I can start riding again after 20 something years off. I did ride him a few times last summer but other than that he hasn't been worked in any way for probably a year and a half. He is incredibly out of shape, as in lack of muscle and gets winded easily.

    We started out by lunging with side reins for 10 or 15 minutes. That was going really well but then a week ago we discovered long lining (or double longing). I went to a demonstration where it looked like something I could do with my guy. A couple of days later I rigged up a set of lines and gave it a go. It was GREAT! Gunar was so much more relaxed (after the initial, Yikes, it's on my back legs!). He actually softened, lowered his head and worked over his back. That magic difference? Being able to give a quick half halt and release. Gunar is pretty hesitant about accepting contact as he seems to worry about hands becoming too heavy or holding and not following. I think the longing with side reins or a Pessoa was reinforcing this worry for him.

    My goal for now is to build his topline a bit before I do much from his back. I did get on him once about a week ago. We just walked for about 15 minutes. He was very good in spite of the fact that there were 2 sparrows in the wicked scarey end of the arena. He kept at least one foot on the ground at all times and listened. I can't ask for more right now.

    I am thrilled!
    "The captive bolt is not a proper tool for slaughter of equids they regain consciousness 30 seconds after being struck fully aware they are being vivisected." Dr Friedlander DVM & frmr Chief USDA Insp


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #35
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    Jun. 3, 2010
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    176

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    Quote Originally Posted by fish View Post
    "Be compassionate to others because we are all engaged in a life and death struggle whether we know it or not. The only people who have not experienced tragedy are those who have not lived long enough."
    This is so true! My personal victory is not really horse related. I finished chemo for breast cancer and had my final surgery to complete reconstruction and have my port removed. I should be cleared to ride again in a couple more weeks. I can't wait!!!


    8 members found this post helpful.

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2000
    Location
    California
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    8,133

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    Quote Originally Posted by RWR View Post
    This is so true! My personal victory is not really horse related. I finished chemo for breast cancer and had my final surgery to complete reconstruction and have my port removed. I should be cleared to ride again in a couple more weeks. I can't wait!!!
    That's great news - you'll have to update us after your first ride!!
    My Mustang Adventures - Mac, my mustang | Annwylid D'Lite - my Cob filly

    "A horse's face always conveys clearly whether it is loved by its owner or simply used." - Anja Beran


    2 members found this post helpful.

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Oct. 4, 2003
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    Hurdle Mills, NC
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    Quote Originally Posted by RWR View Post
    This is so true! My personal victory is not really horse related. I finished chemo for breast cancer and had my final surgery to complete reconstruction and have my port removed. I should be cleared to ride again in a couple more weeks. I can't wait!!!
    Congratulations! Cancer treatment has improved so very much, and continues to do so so fast it makes my head spin. I remember back in the 60's when friends going into oncology were asked how they could endure such a depressing field. Now I'm seeing a lot of people coming back from stage four, into full remission lately, living full lives many years after receiving veritable death sentences-- including one who came back from breast cancer surgery and resumed training a young horse she successfully showed Grand Prix at the age of 64. I can't imagine finding the courage to endure the physical and emotional roller coaster myself, but am perpetually amazed by the strength many find within themselves when adversity does strike. I hope you post photos-- or at least have a party or something when you do get back on your horse!
    Last edited by fish; May. 10, 2013 at 10:11 AM.



  18. #38
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    Oct. 30, 2009
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    Wow, my victory is nothing compared to you guys. Some brave women here.

    In the last couple of weeks my "bad" loader is now my good loader with the divider actually in the trailer. My Arab, not so much, but he is standing quietly in the trailer. Now time to hook up the butt bar and close the door with him. Soon hope to take them both trailer riding TOGETHER with a friend for the first time!
    "I've spent most of my life riding horses. The rest I've just wasted". - Anonymous



  19. #39
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    Oct. 4, 2003
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    Hurdle Mills, NC
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    My favorite horse-related "victory" happened over 20 years ago-- when my mare was only 5. I'd been trying for months to get a good lengthening, then one day decided to work on shoulder-in as preparation, hoping it would get her straighter, with her hind feet stepping more under her middle to get more push. It worked so well that she took off into a lengthening I liked so much that I immediately dismounted and stripped off her tack right there in the arena. Then came the amazing part: my mare pulled herself up and took off into this amazing lengthened trot all by herself, as if to say "look what I just learned!" Unforgettable!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #40
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    Jun. 3, 2010
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    176

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    Wow! That is awesome! What a cool moment.

    Quote Originally Posted by fish View Post
    My favorite horse-related "victory" happened over 20 years ago-- when my mare was only 5. I'd been trying for months to get a good lengthening, then one day decided to work on shoulder-in as preparation, hoping it would get her straighter, with her hind feet stepping more under her middle to get more push. It worked so well that she took off into a lengthening I liked so much that I immediately dismounted and stripped off her tack right there in the arena. Then came the amazing part: my mare pulled herself up and took off into this amazing lengthened trot all by herself, as if to say "look what I just learned!" Unforgettable!



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