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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 20, 2006
    Posts
    889

    Default Drama Llama Situation-WWYD

    A bit of back story....

    In laws inherited their property about 10 years ago and along with it came a man who was friends with the previous occupant (FIL's crazy sister from whom they inherited the farm). The man kept his llamas on the property for free.

    My in-laws still permitted him to keep the llamas as long as he took care of them. His health has been waning for quite a few years and in-laws found themselves more often watering them during the summer and winter since he wouldn't.

    18 months ago, FIL suddenly dropped dead. MIL is a piece of work (LOL, if anyone remembers my other MIL stories!). MIL & my husband told llama guy then that the animals needed to go. They need to downsize parts of this hobby property to eventually go up for sale and MIL doesn't want responsibility of having neglected animals around, etc. Plus, she just doesn't like the llamas (well now llama) since it keeps trying to squish her (too many) little dogs.

    Slowly some of the llamas disappeared. There's one left and he just won't get rid of it. He's been standing up to MIL. MIL backs down and wants someone to solve her problem. I think the guy has had 10 years of free llama board from the family, he should get the heck out of there.

    Would would you do?

    Type up a note saying he has 30 days to vacate the premise?

    Talking hasn't worked...but husband could talk to drama llama guy directly.

    This is really like the houseguest that never left, complete with llamas. Lots of ugly arguments ensuing lately, etc. Who knew llamas really were so dramatic??


    2 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 15, 2003
    Location
    Tampa, FL
    Posts
    4,343

    Default

    Tell him in writing to remove llamas by (date) or else eviction will be started with the county courthouse.
    Every man has a right to his opinion, but no man has a right to be wrong in his facts.
    Bernard M. Baruch


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  3. #3
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2008
    Location
    Scranton, PA
    Posts
    736

    Default

    There's a Facebook page I follow called "two llamas and a whole lot of drama."

    That being said, have your husband have a talk with Drama Llama Dude. If that doesn't work, then a formal eviction notice should get the job done.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2012
    Posts
    1,915

    Default

    People who let themselves be walked all over will get walked all over.

    Your MIL or someone on her behalf just needs to make this happen.

    In order not to be treated like a mat, you have to be firm and not mind people being upset with you.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5

    Default

    Send him a written request giving him a deadline to move his llama, and if he doesn't comply by that date, call animal control. Unless he has a written boarding agreement, you don't need to send him an eviction notice. If there is no contract in writing, the law does not require a formal eviction notice.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    9,034

    Default

    I think the tenancy rights depend on the state or province. As others have said, send a certified letter, return receipt of service, with a definite deadline for llama removal, and what will happen at 12:01 a.m. on that day, including calling animal control or the state vet, or whoever handles abandoned animals in your location. Don't discuss it with the man any longer, or give any concessions, and if (or more likely when) he doesn't comply, then do what you said you will. No compromise, no discussion, no backing down or the llama will be there forever.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2008
    Location
    now in KCMO, and plan to stay there
    Posts
    3,129

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    Or, call a local zoo and see if they have a use for a free llama? Since the owner is not providing care, llama could be considered abandoned? (get legal advice on how to deal with this whole mess)
    Jeanie
    RIP Sasha, best dog ever, pictured shortly before she died, Death either by euthanasia or natural causes is only the end of the animal inhabiting its body; I believe the spirit lives on.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2004
    Location
    South Park
    Posts
    3,276

    Default

    Easy!
    Keep calling him and playing this song for him - over and over and over until llama is gone!!
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KMYN4djSq7o
    A friend told me I was delusional. I almost fell off my unicorn.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2000
    Location
    Rochester,NY,USA
    Posts
    7,513

    Default

    Well, if talking to him hasn't solved the problem, then send a registerd letter informing him that next months board on the llama will be $x/month and x=$500 or more. Also that back board for the previous 10 yrs will be $60K if llama isn't gone by X date.
    Sue
    Back in my day, we didn't have as many warning labels because people weren't so dang stupid!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 27, 2009
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    2,243

    Default

    No, I doubt you can start charging him back board. However, you can, right now, document and make it clear to him what's happening - your notice will document that you (or whoever) is in deed the owner, that he is indeed squatting and no longer has permission to be on the property, that he is NOT the owner, and that he does NOT have rights to be there, which he may try to claim if you don't do this - you can send a 30 day's notice (or what ever is legal), you can probably start charging him board, but be careful of that, because if you charge board, and he pays it, and if you accept it, you may in fact be back in a legal agreement which gives him rights again to be there. So I would not only NOT charge any board, but if he offers you any money, I would not accept it, and cointinue to advocate for his removal from the property, voluntarily or not, so he can NOT claim any rights or priveleges or ownership of the property. In the 30 days notice, make sure you outline what on the property is yours and what is his. For example, he can't take any outbuildings or equipment (which belong to you) with him, and list all those things.

    Whatever you do, you need to have an attorney involved to make sure you are doing things by the book.

    You need a document trail to prove that he's a tenant, to start with - there are some places where occupancy of a certain amount of time and no attempt to evict is complicent that he has either squatter's rights of some kind or that he is some kind of owner.

    You need to decide - either you act responsibly to claim and manage your property, now, or you give up and let him have the run of it. Its really your decision. There really isn't a choice to just let him continue to walk all over you, unless you want to lose the place, either in kind or in fact. the owner needs to suck it up and take responsibility for his property and get the squatter off of it if he wants to keep it.
    Trainer's website - photos of my horse Airborne under About and Francesca Edwards also in media page 1

    http://www.patricianorciadressage.com/


    3 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2006
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    1,919

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    I would contact a lawyer. It does sound like the llama is basically abandoned. But you'd really want to check your legal stuff before you did anything beyond a certified letter.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2008
    Location
    On the sunny side of the street
    Posts
    23

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    Quote Originally Posted by magicteetango View Post
    I would contact a lawyer. It does sound like the llama is basically abandoned. But you'd really want to check your legal stuff before you did anything beyond a certified letter.
    ^^This. This is a complicated landlord/tenant matter especially since the occupancy has been going on for over 10 years and your in-laws continued (a/k/a consented to) the arrangement once they inherited the property 10 years ago. Get legal advice about the proper way to handle it.
    Last edited by GaiterGirl; May. 8, 2013 at 09:37 PM. Reason: typo
    The truth will set you free. But first, it will piss you off ~ Gloria Steinem


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  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul. 13, 2008
    Posts
    2,863

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    If his health is poor, is it really a matter of the owner not "wanting" to care for the llamas? Not that poor health gives him unlimited access to free llama board, but the OP does make it sound as if there was a bit of a sudden about-face about the situation from the farm owners, and that it came at a very bad time for the llama owner. Might have created some resentment that's grown as a) he's gotten rid of the animals and b) maybe has run into a problem finding somewhere for the last one.

    Maybe the guy's a real jerk, and deserves all his troubles. But if he's been around for 10 years, there must have been some mutual tolerance, at least.


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  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 29, 2000
    Location
    Pretty much horse heaven
    Posts
    2,859

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    Trailer llama to his house and tie it to a tree with food and water.
    Hindsight bad, foresight good.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct. 20, 2006
    Posts
    889

    Default

    Llama owner's health has been declining for as long as I've known him (7/8 years?) and he has had severe psychiatric issues as well.

    I wasn't there the other day, but husband said at least he's been out watering the last llama which is a good start. He won't water them daily in the winter because he said that they are like camels and go at least 3 days without water and can just eat snow. Of course, not kosher with the in-laws, so they watered the poor critters. For the few years, they had a retired horse living with the llamas, so in-laws paid for all of the hay and did all of the watering, etc for the entire group of critters.

    I think it should have been addressed years ago. FIL was a bit soft too and would always be telling him to cut down, but llama guy at one point had increased the field from the original 4 to 7.

    I understand that it may be hard placing the last one. My understanding it is around 15 and is kind of geriatric.

    But 18 months should be long enough to rehome them I think or euthanize if too elderly or not able to be placed.

    More recent llama drama...MIL was dismantling part of the larger field they had fenced (no climb type fencing panels) for the horse years ago. They bought and paid for that section. Llama guy was po'd over this. She got all upset and started crying...she doesn't want to be mean, etc. No spine to stick to what she needs to have done.

    But probably why my two SIL are still living at home in their 30s sponging off of MIL who is rapidly consuming what's left of FIL's life insurance.

    Husband didn't see llama guy while he was there the other day, but did tell his mom I would be happy to help rehome the llama (gee thanks...) and that she needs to stick up for herself. He will be back there soon and will see how it's going. I think the guy would back down if she'd just have some cajones.

    I agree that technically a lawyer should be involved. I am hoping that it shouldn't evolve to that point, but if I can talk to her and tell her that there may be some legal issues, maybe she will just pick up the phone and stick to her guns. There is no way jose she'd pay for a lawyer to sort this out.

    LOL on the tree. Pretty sure we'd never be able to actually catch the llama, let alone tie it!



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec. 5, 2011
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    59

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    I am not sure where you are located, but Flamenco horse here on COTH is involved in llama rescue. She is part of a group that covers the majority of the eastern seaboard and as far west as the Mississippi. Even if you are not in an area her rescue covers, I am sure she will have good ideas and know who you should contact. Or you could just go to their website. Google Southeast Llama Rescue. Good luck!



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec. 5, 2011
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    59

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    Oh, and a 15 yo llama is not too old to be rehomed. Not young by any stretch of the imagination, but not on deaths door either.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2008
    Posts
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    I have nothing constructive offer other than my sympathies and this, hopefully brings a smile.
    Worry is the biggest enemy of the present... it’s like using your imagination to create things you don’t want.
    Click for the ideal stocking stuffer for anyone equine!


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