The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst ... 345
Results 81 to 99 of 99
  1. #81
    Join Date
    May. 20, 2005
    Location
    Desert Southwest
    Posts
    6,431

    Default

    Don't you wear gloves, mvp? Problem solved.



  2. #82
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    17,025

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ThreeFigs View Post
    Don't you wear gloves, mvp? Problem solved.
    I do! I have for a long time. But others don't. One time in 1985 I didn't so I have PTSD re: nylon and bare hands. I wanted to spare others.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #83
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2010
    Location
    Tucson
    Posts
    7,288

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sandy M View Post
    Well, for me, while I can see it's possible use for stability issues, I just don't get it's efficacy if you really think a horse is going to buck/be rank. When my horse - in his younger days and occasionally still - gets stupid, I want/need BOTH hands to get him back under control. If I merely held onto the saddle/bucking strap, I'd be on the ground in no time.
    For the spank on the butt creating a buck situations like mentioned above, it's something to grab prior to the misbehavior. I don't know about others, but with my horse the first launch/kick out is always the most severe, and also the one he can create from a standstill and pretty "frame" or canter or whatever other gait he wishes. If I know I may prompt that response, grabbing it to sit through the first lurch then allows me to still be in the saddle for the subsequent correction, and allows that to happen faster. I do let go after the initial lurch for full use of my hands.

    It's NOT helpful for me in a spontaneous misbheavior situation, and in fact that was the defining factor in my purchasing a saddle with thigh blocks - if my horse goes into a spontaneous explosion (last one was from a bike whizzing by behind him when he was already wound up, something which is normally no issue) the thigh block can keep me from ending up on his withers, which is how far forward I have to be in order to reach the point where he grows enough mane to hold onto. I may have to post a photo of the thigh blocks doing their job.
    Last edited by netg; May. 7, 2013 at 01:57 PM. Reason: Typos
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed



  4. #84
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2008
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    2,315

    Default

    Wandering in from the eventing forum so I'm not sure this will help much if most people here don't tend to use breastplates...

    I've found that grab straps attached to the Ds of the saddle (or Ds attached to stirrup bars) don't seem to be in a place that I would instinctively grab for during an oh $&(^ moment. It is too close to the saddle.

    I've also found that the shorter grab straps are harder to find during an unexpected naughty episode.

    My solution is to find a longer grab strap (Perri's makes one) and attach it to the breastplate of the saddle. It actually sticks up higher so it's easier to grab in an emergency. I have a photo of the setup below. You have to scroll down a bit ( I am changing web hosts soon so it will eliminate the need for scrolling in the near future!)

    http://thepitchforkchronicles.com/page5.php


    3 members found this post helpful.

  5. #85
    Join Date
    Mar. 25, 2011
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    5,396

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mkevent View Post
    Wandering in from the eventing forum so I'm not sure this will help much if most people here don't tend to use breastplates...

    I've found that grab straps attached to the Ds of the saddle (or Ds attached to stirrup bars) don't seem to be in a place that I would instinctively grab for during an oh $&(^ moment. It is too close to the saddle.

    I've also found that the shorter grab straps are harder to find during an unexpected naughty episode.

    My solution is to find a longer grab strap (Perri's makes one) and attach it to the breastplate of the saddle. It actually sticks up higher so it's easier to grab in an emergency. I have a photo of the setup below. You have to scroll down a bit ( I am changing web hosts soon so it will eliminate the need for scrolling in the near future!)

    http://thepitchforkchronicles.com/page5.php
    Now that is the first purchasable Oh Crap Strap that I like enough that I might buy! And thanks for the blog post because it seems like a nice checklist for showing. I went to my first show with my two hands swinging (West Indian for "empty-handed") and relied on the kindness of others for the whole day. I'm learning what to take a bit at a time. I sure wish I knew about your list the first time.

    Paula
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).



  6. #86
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2008
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    2,315

    Default

    Paula-at the next show, park next to me!

    I'm one of those OCD types that has to be prepared for every contingency. My poor trailer dressing room is so crammed when I go to shows that I can barely get changed in it!!

    The reason I have checklists is that my memory is really horrible so I can't rely on it for anything!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #87
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2007
    Posts
    840

    Default

    I have had a bucking strap attached to my saddle for many years. When I first started riding dressage, I had to undo a lot of bad habits, and learn to use my core and seat effectively. The bucking strap that I have, is a little taller. It is buckled to the dees of the saddle. My instructor would have me hold on to the bucking strap to keep from pulling on the reins while I was building my core strength. I would never intend to use that to keep me in place during a buck.

    I used the strap this morning during some extended canter work. I had a hold of my reins, along with the bucking strap. It gave me a bit of stability while working on a big movement outside of my comfort zone. I have long arms, and my strap is tall enough to keep my hands in the correct position. What I have found, is the strap is a great "crutch" for working on the big movements that make me feel like I am unsteady in the seat or contact.
    Unashamed Member of the Dressage Arab Clique
    CRAYOLA POSSE= Thistle



  8. #88
    Join Date
    Jul. 18, 2005
    Posts
    404

    Default

    I ride green young Thoroughbreds almost exclusively. Every saddle I own has a grab strap on it, and I almost always ride with a neckstrap as well. I'm not proud; the trip to the ground gets longer, and the impact greater, with each passing year. The neck strap is infinitely more useful in crisis situations, but the grab straps occasionally save my sorry butt. Plus they make nice handles for lifting/carrying the saddle when not riding, and I hang my fly whisk from them in summertime. When I take them off I always miss them and put them back on.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  9. #89
    Join Date
    Oct. 7, 2012
    Location
    Somewhere out there
    Posts
    315

    Default

    I too use a neck strap instead of a 'hail mary' strap on front of the saddle. Mine is just a stirrup leather when I'm schooling something a bit fresh or green but it does help.



  10. #90
    Join Date
    Mar. 3, 2012
    Posts
    235

    Default

    When I was first learning to ride all of the saddles at the barn had bucking straps, though I only used it a few times, it was nice to know it was there if needed! I personally see no problem in having one on your saddle though the barns I have been at recently don't have any of these straps on the saddles.
    http://www.horsez-r-us.blogspot.com
    Blog of an ordinary and every day horse lover!



  11. #91
    Join Date
    Oct. 30, 2009
    Posts
    1,962

    Default

    I don't use them. I fall off instead.
    "I've spent most of my life riding horses. The rest I've just wasted". - Anonymous


    4 members found this post helpful.

  12. #92
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2012
    Location
    Twin Cities
    Posts
    2,374

    Default

    Not a strap that would do anything to save me, even remotely, but when I was learning to post as a little kid my instructor put a (hot pink) leg wrap around the horse's neck to keep my hands steady. I have been thinking of putting one around my torso lately, to keep my elbows from flapping...


    2 members found this post helpful.

  13. #93
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2009
    Posts
    19

    Default

    I use a loose-ish hunting breastplate...do you have those in the US? Being long in the arm and short in the body my hands end up well forward of the pommel. I use it mainly as a loose reference point so I don't fiddle, and to stabilise my outside hand.(Am old and creaky) My friend is the same height as me, but is long in the body and short in the arms, and finds the strap on the saddle best placed for her.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #94
    Join Date
    Nov. 10, 2005
    Location
    Va
    Posts
    4,130

    Default

    I have one on my endurance saddle and my english saddle. I refer to them as my "Oh s**t" strap.



  15. #95
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2006
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    357

    Default

    A 'sissy' checking in. When my 17 hand horse decides to spook, bolt, or buck, I don't give a hoot if my hands have a soft, following contact. I just want to stay on the beast.
    I love my buck strap.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  16. #96
    Join Date
    Nov. 18, 2004
    Location
    Catonsville, MD
    Posts
    6,966

    Default

    Have had a bucking strap on my jump & dressage saddle for years. They are useful for steadying oneself in the sitting trot in lessons, and gives me a place to grab when a horse unexpectedly surges ahead in transitions. When you ask for forward and you get a LOT more forward than you were expecting, you don't want to grab mouth, and you don't want to eat dirt.

    I call it the Jesus handle. Because generally when I grab it, I'm saying "Jesus!"

    (no disrespect intended)

    And I can think of at least two times when I used it to stay on during some naughtiness that included bucking and leaping about.

    You can have my bucking strap when you revoke gravity during my rides.
    I tolerate all kinds of animal idiosyncrasies.
    I've found that I don't tolerate people idiosyncrasies as well. - Casey09



    2 members found this post helpful.

  17. #97
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    69

    Default

    I always have a strap on my saddle. A bit longer than store bought ones, my dad is skilled at working leather and made mine. Its long enough that it sits in between the saddle and my breastplate wither strap. It has saved my butt numerous times!

    http://s20.photobucket.com/user/Aceo...085d4.jpg.html



  18. #98
    Join Date
    Mar. 7, 2004
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    1,258

    Default

    I ride most horses with both a neck strap and a buck strap. I usually take the neck strap off before I go into the dressage arena, but the buck strap stays on. I use it for sitting medium trots and when I have a horse who leaps into canter departs.

    Neck strap is great if the horse is head high, but buck strap is way better if the horse is doing a real bronco act with head between its knees. A neck strap then just pulls you forward - and that ends up with you on the ground!. Way easier to sit deep, put your legs in front of you and lean back with the buck strap.

    Of course, I never need to do this because my horses are all so well started and well mannered that they wouldn't ever dream of bucking on their first or third or even their 100th ride!!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  19. #99
    Join Date
    Apr. 6, 2010
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    2,084

    Default

    on the rare occasion I do ride it's with a strap mostly for stability during oh bleep moments. DD rides in one as well and it's saved her on occasion from pony's rather naughty behavior. Hers has a piece of hot pink vet wrap on it for the cue "grab pink" from the trainer. DD's learned to read pony better though and he's not nearly as naughty but she still has the strap just in case.
    Adoring fan of A Fine Romance
    Originally Posted by alicen:
    What serious breeder would think that a horse at that performance level is push button? Even so, that's still a lot of buttons to push.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #100
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2009
    Location
    Southern Colorado
    Posts
    296

    Default

    I did purchase one of the Tellington balance straps for my OTTB because I just had to see if the dang thing actually worked. By cracky it does! I use it every ride, whether I need to constantly ride with it or just have it there. It does have a tendency to help re-balance him and lower his head as well as work well for a whoa. It's "gadgety" but I like it!


    1 members found this post helpful.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 14
    Last Post: Sep. 16, 2013, 05:46 PM
  2. Replies: 9
    Last Post: Aug. 4, 2011, 06:48 AM
  3. Replies: 13
    Last Post: Jan. 24, 2011, 11:32 AM
  4. Youtube vid showing lunging using a "flank strap"
    By pluvinel in forum Off Course
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: Oct. 10, 2010, 09:48 PM
  5. Training the bucking/"dirty" horse for dressage...experiences?
    By Cat - OnceUponADressageDream in forum Dressage
    Replies: 44
    Last Post: Oct. 12, 2009, 07:40 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •