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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 5, 2012
    Posts
    305

    Default Horse Laundry: DIY or Send it out?

    I'm curious how you all handle washing your horse laundry, specifically winter blankets. I just washed my 2 heavy and 2 medium winter turnouts at my local laundromat. I spent $15 to wash and $12 for the bottle of Rambo wash. I left them out for a few days to dry and now they're tucked away for the season. It was cheap and painless, but it seems more people are sending them out for profession cleaning. What do you do?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2009
    Posts
    706

    Default

    Hmmm... You washed four blankets with one bottle of wash? Maybe I misread the label - I thought it was only 1-2 blankets/bottle.

    I send mine out - it's $25/blanket, and seems worth it to me. But if one bottle covers more blankets than I thought, I may have to re-think it...



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 7, 2012
    Posts
    84

    Default

    I do the lightweight blankets myself and sometimes send the heavy one out at the end of winter before I put it in storage. It doesn't seem worth it to me to send them out given what a lot of places charge. After one or two washings, I can buy a new blanket if I get one on sale.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 6, 2013
    Posts
    310

    Default

    I send winter blankets out. I hardly save much money going to the laundromat, plus it takes a whole day, plus I can never, ever, ever get horse pee smell out on my own. I do wash stable sheets, fleece coolers, and Back on Track blankets myself because I wash them so frequently that they would be very expensive to send out.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2005
    Location
    Spotsylvania, VA
    Posts
    13,419

    Default

    I got a heavy duty washing machine at Habitat for Humanity for $125. It sits on the driveway outside my hay barn and runs off an extension cord and hose and drains into the grass. It is GREAT....no more horse laundry in the house.
    I wasn't always a Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2010
    Posts
    2,191

    Default

    Where I used to live in MN, I had a great lady who very cheaply washed and repaired blankets, so I always sent them out because there were always minor repairs that she could do. With three horses and 4 blankets/horse, it was worth it.
    Now that I've moved to the deep south where there is no such thing as winter, and I haven't found someone like my repair lady here, I wash them myself in my own washing machine. I just have to hide it from the hubby.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 10, 2008
    Location
    Western NY
    Posts
    5,884

    Default

    I send my winter blanket to the cleaner--it's $18 with waterproofing. They do a great job, and they'll fix tears too. I have mended holes before, but eventually I just give up and slap duct tape on them, so it's better to leave it to a professional in my case...

    Saddle pads are what I have a hard time with. I hate going to a laundromat, but my washer is old and plumbing is old and even with a lint trap I still end up clogging the basement sink.
    "Remain relentlessly cheerful."

    Graphite/Pastel Portraits



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2008
    Posts
    2,233

    Default

    I take the pressure washer to mine to knock as much of the crusty/tough stuff as possible, then I send them through my own washing machine. Haven't had any problems. (Knock on wood, my horse has been pretty kind to his blankets and I haven't had to do any repairs for 5 years now.)
    *friend of bar.ka

    "Evidently, I am an unrepentant b*tch, possible trouble maker, and all around super villian"



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2006
    Posts
    1,919

    Default

    I forget how much I pay to wash them but with repairs and re water proofing I am pretty sure it isn't much more than $30 at worst (that is with repairs). With two kids under two, I would do anything to avoid going to the laundromat for a whole day. Love having them sent out!

    It is why I have so many saddle pads I prefer not to use them more than twice before washing again, this way I only have to go to the laundromat once in a while.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    18,614

    Default

    I send them out to wash...$12 each. I do have to reproof them myself, but most of my blankets are now Schneiders and you put them in the dryer to revive the waterproofing. So, I have two or three every year that I reproof in my washer after they've been cleaned.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2000
    Location
    Greenville, MI,
    Posts
    11,889

    Default

    I always washed saddle pads myself weekly, And light sheets as needed.
    BUT winter blankets were not possible, there was a woman who had a laundry service at my old barn, You could bag them up and put your name and phone number on them, and she would pick them up and for 10.00 each they were back in about a week. She even did small repairs. That is the best.
    "you can only ride the drama llama so hard before it decides to spit in your face." ?Caffeinated.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    7,965

    Default

    I used to send them out, but then got cheap and now wash them myself. I curry off the hair, then vacuum them to get out the dirt, then launder them in the washer and hang them out to line dry. They come out nice!
    "The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits." Albert Einstein

    http://s1098.photobucket.com/albums/...2011%20Photos/



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2012
    Posts
    206

    Default

    I use a pressure washer, hang dry and repsray with waterproofing from the outdoors store. It is pretty dry here so the waterproofing doesn't get to much use - I need the blankets mostly for the cold. I do my own repairs in general - the repairs aren't always pretty but they get the job done. Too many blankets for sending them out to be affordable.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug. 1, 2007
    Location
    West Palm Beach, FL
    Posts
    4,144

    Default

    I'll wash day-to-day stuff at home - saddle pads, wraps, etc. But blankets (used to) go to the tack shop to be cleaned. My local shop in IL would wash, repair any minor boo-boos, and give it back to me in a polybag for summer storage for about $25.
    Yeah, well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion, man.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar. 13, 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    956

    Default

    My local dry cleaner bought a designated "horse-blanket washing machine". They wash, waterproof, and pack in a zippered storage bag for $15 each. Those blankets come back looking like they're brand new from the store!
    "Dogs give and give and give. Cats are the gift that keeps on grifting." –Bradley Trevor Greive


    2 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr. 5, 2012
    Posts
    305

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GreyDes View Post
    Hmmm... You washed four blankets with one bottle of wash? Maybe I misread the label - I thought it was only 1-2 blankets/bottle.

    I send mine out - it's $25/blanket, and seems worth it to me. But if one bottle covers more blankets than I thought, I may have to re-think it...
    Nope, I used the whole bottle for all 4 blankets. 8 oz bottle, 2 ounces of liquid per blanket. Just 4 tablespoons of the detergent in each load gets sufficiently sudsy.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    5,023

    Default

    I wash mine at home. I've seen too many come back without waterproofing or with bad repairs to trust mine to anyone else. Or, worse, the ones that didn't come back at all! I hose the worst crud off, scrubbing with a brush, or just vac off if it is just hair and such. Then wash in the washer with Rambo wash. Line dry in our mud room shower. I also do my own repairs.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr. 3, 2011
    Posts
    620

    Default

    After doing mine myself for two years (one rain sheet, one heavy stable blanket, and one medium turnout) I will be sending (driving, actually, because gas will be cheaper than shipping them ups) them to a woman who does this sort of thing. They need repairs, so I am expecting a bill of close to $150. That is, however, less than replacing one of them, so I figure it is worth it.

    Regular stuff (polos, pads, sheepskins, saddle covers, grooming rags, etc.) I do at home.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
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    18,614

    Default

    If you're in the Lousiville, Lexington KY area, Fred's 2 the Rescue (in Frankfort, right off I-64) does a wonderful job. Their main business is cleaning and repairing fireman's gear. They pick up and deliver in the Bluegrass area...unfortunately, I'm just a little too far. They do a wonderful job and it's not expensive. Their repairs are top notch. They just don't reproof.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Nov. 25, 2005
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    1,065

    Default

    Well in my area a MW wash costs about 25 and the HW are about 30.

    There were a couple times that I did them myself- but then it was like 10 at the laundromat (each), they weren't getting completely clean, and I don't have a pressure washer to hose them down first, and then add in the cost of the detergent and the hassle and the time it took me to do it... Sigh. Totally worth it to pay for someone else to do it, but ridiculously expensive.



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