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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2011
    Posts
    188

    Default Longeing only one way

    My OTTB will only longe to the right. He is very good- calm stays out, stops and goes very well. When I try to make him go to the left he just stands there, wont even walk. I try really hard to get him going but absolutely nothing will make him go! (Its kind of embarassing looking). I ended up having to just jog next to him. Does anyone have any tips for me to teach him to go foreward and out on a circle?

    ps... he did have a unsoundness issue on the left front, that is gone now but it does make me wonder if that contributes at all



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    2,492

    Default

    Can you describe the cues you have tried so far, to get him to go? Would save the thread from becoming a stream of "You should try X" / "Already Did" posts.

    How long ago was the lameness resolved? Could be superstitious on his part (this hurt last time, so not doing that again). But refusal to travel in a certain way, if his behavior is respectful and obedient when going the other way-- maybe he's saying it's not fully resolved.
    Try to break down crushing defeats into smaller, more manageable failures. It’s also helpful every now and then to stop, take stock of your situation, and really beat yourself up about it.The Onion



  3. #3
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2011
    Location
    Snohomish, WA
    Posts
    498

    Default

    Is it only a longeing issue? Will he go to the left under saddle? Does he run to the left out in turnout?



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 15, 2008
    Posts
    2,934

    Default

    get someone to lead him left while on the longe til he "gets it"?
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Gravity works, and the laws of physics are a bitch.

    Member: Rabid Garden Snail Clique



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 10, 2008
    Posts
    1,937

    Default

    Will he move his haunches at all when you wave a whip at him?
    Proud member of the "I'm In My 20's and Hope to Be a Good Rider Someday" clique

    PONY'TUDE



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 31, 2012
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HungarianHippo View Post
    How long ago was the lameness resolved? Could be superstitious on his part (this hurt last time, so not doing that again). But refusal to travel in a certain way, if his behavior is respectful and obedient when going the other way-- maybe he's saying it's not fully resolved.
    Agree with the above.

    In addition, most horses being placed back into work after having time off -or- one's being trained for the first time will typically have one "better" side and one "weaker" side. Sometimes it's subtle, other times it's very obvious, even to the extreme of your horse and sometimes much worse.

    There are countless reasons. Needs Chiro adjustment, old injury not healed, careful or "superstitious" to one side for whatever reason, teeth, or even that he just doesn't know how, or want, to travel that way etc... They can also be opinionated at times

    OTTB's can be at times stand-offish to line work because most (though certainly not all) of them have little to no experience with it and even if they did it was most likely only done at a VERY early age. Not to mention the training could have even been a bad experience for them. Generally, once they are under saddle the line work stops as they don't usually practice this on the track. However, if a horse is injured and requires rehab, then most likely it becomes part of their rehab and therefore they gain experience with it...

    Not one (but I've only worked with 5 total direct re-trains) had any substantial line work done with them. Most took to it rather quickly, and one just wanted nothing to do with it so we spent over a month getting it down. With her it was in her head, not her body. She was not an easy re-train but that's another story. With her we had short sessions. Even just a few steps in the right direction was considered a session because she responded correctly. This boosts their confidence. Even the "hard to retrain" types are pretty much eager to please, they almost crave it.

    First, rule out injury and/or discomfort. Then, just take it slow. Give him time to make correct decisions. They respond much better when asked, not told, and generally come along much faster when they are allowed to have a choice. Oh, and they usually make the right one's after a while Very rewarding.


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